(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

m. 

JHH 
HHH 

HP 

B 



FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 




MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 

Andover, Massachusetts 
475-6960 



l 



3U 






Annual 
Report 
for tlxe 

Town of 
Andover 



1974-1975 



(July 31, 1974 through 
December 31, 1975) 

prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 

Chapter 40, Section 49 

of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

and Article II, Section Four 

of the By-Laws of the 

Town of Andover 



AS* 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreporto19751978ando 




Board of Selectmen 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
01810 

March 1, 1976 



Dear Fellow Citizen: 



It is that time of year -when we match our wish list with the means 
at our disposal. This year, as I have previously commented on September 4, 
1974 and February 20, 1975 concerning the previous two years, each one of 
us will be faced with making very difficult decisions at Town Meeting. 

This year, however, there is a subtle but important distinction: 
Resources available to us from outside Andover are decreasing, whereas 
requests for appropriations to meet our desires are increasing. Thus, even 
a "no increase performance budget" philosophy -would result in a built-in tax 
increase. Many factors are at work exacerbating this difficult situation: 
For example, County expenses are up for Andover, largely because of Massa- 
chusetts law and philosophy which states that Andover (as a "wealthy" community) 
must pay more than the so-called "poorer" communities; State reimbursements 
are being reduced to cover programs mandated by the State and originally 
implemented under the spurious promise by Governors that the State would pick 
up the bill; the fiscal position of the State remains more precarious than ever; 
and inflation, though appearing to abate, insidiously eats away at our common 
purchasing power. 

So as you read this report of stewardship for what has happened in 
the past year, you must ask yourself if we can persevere in maintaining the 
quality of life in Andover and at what cost. You can do your duty by attending 
Town Meeting and participating responsibly in its deliberations. 

And I cannot end this letter -without publicly recognizing the service 
of Town employees as well as the voluntary work of fellow citizens who helped 
keep Andover in the front ranks of Massachusetts communities. 

Sincerely, 




Milton Greenberg 
Chairman 



Department of Public Works 




STANLEY CHLEBOWSKI 

January 23, 1912 - June 19, 1975 

Highway Department June 1931 - June 1975 

Highway Superintendent beginning April 4, I960 

JOHN E. CAMPBELL 
September 25, 1929 - April 16, 1975 
Water & Tree Divisions September 1954 - April 1975 

ALFRED F. ZAWOJEK 
October 22, 1916 - April 28, 1975 
Highway Division February 1972 - January 1975 



Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen held 33 regular meetings and 6 special meetings during 
the 18-month period covered by this report . 

At the organizational meeting of March 10, 1975, following the re-election of 
Alan French to the Board, the following officers were elected by the Board: 

Chairman Milton Greenberg; Vice-Chairman George E. Heseltine; and Secretary 
Edmund J. Sullivan, Jr. 

The following is a list of some of the major decisions and actions taken by the 
Board of Selectmen from July, 1974 through December, 1975: 

Merrimack Wastewater Management Study 

Criticized the absence of a benefit-cost analysis in the Merrimack Wastewater 
Management Study Report prepared by the U. S. Army Engineers and assisted by the 
Merrimack Valley Planning Commission. Expressed general dissatisfaction with the 
study and the report. 

Regional Transit Authority 

Members of the Board and staff attended several study and organizational meetings 
prior to the establishment of a Regional Transit Authority, which now includes the 
Cities of Lawrence and Haverhill and the Towns of Methuen, Merrimac and North Andover. 
Concluded that it would not be in the best interest for Andover to join for the time 
being. 

T own Manager 

Reappointed Town Manager J. Maynard Austin on September 3, 1974 for a period of 
three years . 

Section 208 Planning 

Approached Andover' s involvement via the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission in 
areawide waste treatment management planning under Section 208 of the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act with considerable caution. Initially recommended that such 
study be conducted by the Massachusetts Division of Water Pollution Control. When no 
other alternative appeared possible, reluctantly in May, 1975 gave approval to a res- 
olution requesting the Governor to designate the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission 
as the agency to conduct the study. 

Insurance 



Accepted the Better ley Associates Insurance Consultant's report relative to in- 
suring certain buildings at replacement cost with a $25,000 deductible and others at 
actual cash value. 

Industrial Development 

In recognition of the substantial demand for water by a plating plant, dis- 
couraged the Carr Company from constructing a plant in the Lowell Junction Area. 

Did not choose to establish an Industrial Development Financing Authority. 
Traffic 

Established a Traffic Committee composed of the Police Chief, Town Engineer, a 
member of the Planning Board, a representative from the Chamber of Commerce, a 



citizen and the Town Manager as Chairman. 

Upon recommendation of the Traffic Committee, removed all turning restrictions 
on traffic entering and leaving the Raytheon plant via Lowell Street. 

S ewer Service Charge 

Following a public hearing, established a sewer service charge of 30£ per 100 
cu . feet on water purchased from the Town for financing the construction, maintenance 
and operation of the Town's sewerage system and payment of the annual assessment of 
the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District. The charge became effective with water bills 
prepared after July 1, 1975. 

Historic District Study Committee 

Established an Historic District Study Committee of seven citizens. 
Bicentennial Committee 

Established a Bicentennial Committee chairmanned by Mrs. Norma Gammon. 

A ndover Militia 

Reinst ituted, by a proclamation, the Andover Company of Militia to participate 
in drills or parades or other commemorative ceremonies and events, to represent the 
Town of Andover and to honor and perpetuate the memory and tradition of the original 
Andover Company of Militia. 

Water Rates 

Increased the water rates from 40£ to 52£ per 100 cu . feet for all consumption 
in excess of 30,000 cu . feet, effective with billings on or after April 1, 1975. 

W ater 

Approved the sale of water to the Towns of Tewksbury and North Reading on an 
emergency basis at a rate based upon the rates paid by Andover residents plus 30% 
and with a six per cent premium, that is, 87. 5£ per 100 cu . feet. 

Adopted a policy opposing a long-term sale of water to neighboring communities. 

R edistricting 

Approved a plan prepared by Town Clerk Elden R. Salter increasing the number 
of voting precincts from six to eight. New voting precincts to be effective in 1977 
for use in the 1978 elections. 

R ecycling 

Approved a continuation of the recycling program for a third year. 

L egal Counsel 

Approved the appointment of Attorney John C. Serino as counsel for School Com- 
mitteeman George Olesen in the case of Regan vs. three present and past School Com- 
mittee members. 

Land Acquisition 

Acquired as authorized by Town Meeting a 75-acre parcel of land known as the 
Doyle property lying between Lowell Street and High Plain Road for Recreation/Conser- 
vation purposes. 

Acquired as authorized by Town Meeting the so-called Theater Property adjacent 
to the Memorial Hall Library. 



Bikeways Committee 

Established a Bikeways Committee made up of six citizens. 



Town Manager 



This annual report is submitted in accordance with Section 49 of Chapter 40 of 
the General Lawo as amended by Chapter 219 of the Acts of 1975 and covers an 18- 
month period beginning July 1, 1974 and ending December 31, 1975. 

When, by Statutes, the fiscal year for Massachusetts municipalities changed 
from a calendar year to a fiscal year, beginning July 1 and ending June 30, it was 
the belief of the Town Manager that the Annual Report should cover the fiscal year. 
This would mean that the departmental activity reports would coincide with the re- 
ports of expenditures. This would also mean a wrap-up of the Town's finances and 
activities immediately following the close of the fiscal year in June with an Annual 
Report published in late summer. However, the General Court thought otherwise and 
amended the Statutes to state clearly that the Annual Report should be prepared and 
published annually for the calendar year. Inasmuch as the last Annual Report was 
for the 18-month period ending June 30, 1974, this report is for the calendar year of 
1975 plus the last six months of 1974. 

Finances 



During the period covered by this report the country has experienced a severe 
period of inflation and unemployment. The Arab nations elected to take advantage of 
their monopoly of the world's oil supply by increasing the cost of oil several fold, 
causing the price of fuel oil, gasoline and electricity to escalate abnormally. 
Chemicals used in water treatment and road asphalts increased in cost in like manner. 
The fuel adjustment surcharge on electrical utility bills for some months reached as 
high as 50% of the base charge. Although wage and salary increases granted to both 
union and non-union employees did not match the increased cost of living, the cumu- 
lative effect had a substantial influence on appropriations and ultimately on the 
tax rate. 

Despite the increased cost of personal services, supplies and materials, the 
tax rate for fiscal 75 and 76 did not increase. The tax rate for fiscal 75 dropped 
one dollar from the prior year, i.e., 2/3 of the $81 18-month transition year rate. 
The rate promulgated in 1975 for fiscal 76 dropped $2.00 to $51 per $1,000. The 
Federal Revenue Sharing Program contributed substantially to the lowering of the tax 
rate as did programs initiated by former Governor Sargent and the State Legislature 
for State Aid to the cities and towns of the Commonwealth. Not to be overlooked, 
however, are the efforts of the Administration, Selectmen and Finance Committee in 
developing and approving conservative budgets. 

Andover maintains a favorable tax rate in relation to the adjoining communities 
as indicated by the following table. 







1975 


1976 








1976 






Municipal 


Municipal 


As 


sessme 


nt 


Full -Value 


Rank 


Municipality 


Tax Rate 


Tax Rate 


Ratio 


% 


Tax Rate 


1 


Dracut 


162.00 


218.00 




26% 




56.70 


2 


Lawrence 


159.40 


162,40 




32% 




52.00 


3 


Wilmington 


56.50 


64.00 




63% 




40.30 


4 


North Reading 


65.00 


70 c 00 




56% 




39.20 


5 


Met hue n 


158.00 


184.00 




19% 




35.00 


6 


ANDOVER 


53.00 


51.00 




68% 




34.70 


7 


North Andover 


138.00 


153.00 




21% 




32.10 



The assessment ratio and full-value tax rates are based on the Tax Commissioners' 
judgment of full property values. 



Regional Involvement 

For the past two years, there has been a proliferation of regional organizations 
and agencies. With the absence of an acceptable middle-level tier of government be- 
tween the cities and towns and the State, each of these organizations and agencies 
is independent, unrelated and uncoordinated with other regional organizations. Some 
are federally inspired, some State inspired and others created locally to solve re- 
gional problems. 

The Merrimack Valley Planning Commission is having an increasing influence on 
local government. An agreement between the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission and 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Works created a subsidiary organization known 
as the Transportation Planning Advisory Group (TPAG) to serve as a coordinating 
agency for highway projects, including the establishment of priorities. 

A regional Transit Authority was established in November, 1974, following en- 
abling legislation of 1974, with Lawrence, Methuen, Haverhill, North Andover and 
Merrimac participating. Andover ' s Selectmen elected not to participate at this time, 



The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District was established in 1968 -to construct a 
wastewater treatment facility. 

The Ipswich River District was created on October 6, 1966 to oversee the utili- 
zation of the Ipswich River for a water supply and conservation purposes. Andover 's 
Skug River flows into the Ipswich River, bringing about Andover's involvement. 






In answer to a most pressing demand, A Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee 
was organized in the Fall of 1973 with an assist from the State Bureau of Solid 
Waste acting as a catalyst. This organization superseded prior efforts by two groups 
to attack the solid waste problem. Reacting to local interest and State and Federal 
programs, an Andover Bikeways Committee was formed on August 18, 1975, to develop 
bikeways in Andover and to coordinate these with the development of a bikeway pro- 
gram for the Merrimack Valley and Essex County. 

As a result of State Legislation, the Essex County Advisory Board was created 
in 1975 to review the County budget and advise the County Commissioners and the Gen- 
eral Court thereon. 

The immediate and long-range impact of these organizations and agencies on the 
cities and towns of the region is substantial. Consequently, participation by And- 
over's Town officials is vital to the future well-being of the Town. The Selectmen, 
in recognition of the far-reaching importance of the decisions reached by these 
organizations and agencies, established a policy that either the Selectmen, Town 
Manager, Assistant Town Manager or key department heads would serve on these boards. 
In line with this policy, the Selectmen filed Legislation with the General Court to 
enable the Selectmen to appoint Andover's representative on the Merrimack Valley 
Planning Commission. Following the passage of this Legislation in 1975, the Select- 
men appointed the Town Manager to serve on the Commission, replacing Planning Board 
member Donald Mulvey. Mr. Mulvey then replaced the Town Manager as the alternate 
member. Assistant Town Manager Sheldon S. Cohen represents the Town on the Trans- 
portation Planning Advisory Group (TPAG) of the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission 
and the Merrimack Valley Area Transit Study. 

Selectmen Greenberg and Lake have served as Andover's representatives on the 
County Advisory Board, assisted by Assistant Town Manager Cohen. Selectman Sullivan 
has served as the elected official on the Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee, 
with the Town Manager and Public Works Director McQuade in regular attendance at 
these meetings. 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade is Andover's Commissioner on the Great- 
er Lawrence Sanitary District, while Town Engineer John Avery sits on the Ipswich 
River District Commission. 



Legal 

The Selectmen and the Town Manager did not completely escape the controversy 
which surrounded the School Committee and School Administration in 1974 and 1975. 
Involvement came when it became necessary to appoint legal counsel for the School 
Committee members in the case of Lane vs Griggs et al and Regan vs Olesen, Lyons 
and Wragg. At the request of the School Committee, Attorney James A. Murphy was ap- 
pointed on July 8, 1974 as Special Counsel in the Lane vs Griggs et al case. The 
j School Committee lost this case. 

In the fall of 1975, the Town Manager, with the approval of the Selectmen, ap- 
pointed John C. Serino as Counsel for School Committeeman George Olesen in the Regan 
suit. The Town Manager was unable to reach an accord with former School Committee- 
men John Lyons and John Wragg for counsel to represent them in the Regan case. Con- 
sequently, they have employed their own counsel. 

In October, 1975, the Town Manager announced to the Board of Selectmen a final 
settlement of the Water Filtration Plant contract. This contract was signed on 
May 7, 1971, with Morris & Son Construction Corporation, Irving S. Paley, President. 
This contract called for the completion of the plant by December 24, 1972. However, 
it was not until March, 1974 that construction had reached a point where the plant 
could be considered as substantially completed. By that time, the plant was on line 
but there were still many parts of the structure and equipment that needed to be com- 
pleted. 

By April of 1974, the subcontractors refused to continue work, claiming failure 
of the prime contractor to pay them. At that time, the Boston office of the Mary- 
land Casualty Company, the holder of the performance and payment bond, became ac- 
tively involved in the project. 

Almost from the first day of construction of the plant, it appeared certain 
that there would be lengthy litigation involving the Town and the contractor. Re- 
peated requests were filed by the contractor for extras and for an extension of time. 
From the first, the relationship between the contractor, the principal subs, the 
consulting engineers, the project engineers, and the Town officials was stormy to 
say the least. There were many, many hours of conferences during the course of con- 
struction. The sub-contractors and suppliers officially filed 52 requests for di- 
rect payments amounting to $638,874.71. Several times during the process of con- 
struction, critical decisions were made regarding payments to the general contractor. 
Hindsightwise, these decisions, made after consultation with Town Counsel and Camp 

j Dresser & McKee, proved to be correct. The timely release of funds to the contractor 
kept the contractor on the project until substantial completion. Had construction 
ceased prior to substantial completion, the project would have been delayed much 
longer with the necessity of negotiating with the bonding company and placing the 

j project out to bid for completion. 

In view of the number of requests for direct payments, the number of demands 
for extras, and extension of time for completion and the length of the construction 
period, the Town Manager frankly feels that the Town is indeed fortunate to be able 
to see the end of construction of the plant and the settlement of the construction 
contract without lengthy litigation. 

The plant meets all design criteria. Constant supervision of construction by 
Camp, Dresser & McKee, the inspection force on the site, and the special consultants 
employed on soils and concrete did insure that the Town received what the contract 
required. There are no hidden defects to haunt the Town in the years to come. 

Liquidated damages by reason of failure to complete within a prescribed period 
are rarely accepted by contractors. Boards of arbitrators and the courts are re- 
luctant to grant liquidated damages to municipalities. The municipality must define 
its losses sufficiently in order for such damages to be awarded. This has proven 
to be no easy task. In this case, the amount of liquidated damages computed, in 
accordance with the contract, was approximately the cost of the engineering and 
legal expenses. These expenses were assumed by the bonding company, leaving the 
Town whole. 

9 



Insurance 

In the absence of a thorough review of the values of Town buildings used for 
fire insurance purposes for over ten years, the Town Manager, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, entered into a contract with the General Adjustment Bureau in Decem- 
ber, 1973 for appraisal of all Town buildings. This report was delivered in Decem- 
ber, 1974. The Bureau found the insurable replacement cost was $39,922,897 and the 
insurable actual cash value to be $33,687,913. 

Concurrently with the General Adjustment Bureau's appraisal, the Town employed 
a consulting engineering firm, Betterley Associates of Worcester, to conduct an in- 
dependent study of the Town's property and liability insurance program. By the Fall 
of 1974, the consultant had prepared specifications for insurance on property, boil- 
er and machinery, general liability, contractor's equipment floater, fine arts, 
crime, umbrella liability and workmen's compensation. Bids were opened in December 
and an award was made to the Bernardin Insurance Agency for a three-year comprehen- 
sive policy, effective January 1, 1975. 

On advice of Betterley Associates, the Selectmen approved a policy of insuring 
Town property at full cash value when such buildings would not in all probability 
be replaced if totally destroyed. All other properties were to be insured at re- 
placement value. Consequently, as of January 1, 1975, 46 buildings were insured at 
a replacement value of $42,895,211 and 15 buildings and structures were insured at 
actual cash value of $1,347,318. 

Inspection Services 



Inspection services for the Town have been substantially strengthened during the 
past few years. The need has been evidenced by reason of a continuation of sub- 
stantial construction activity of residential, commercial and industrial properties 
and new construction of subdivisions. Inability of a single Building Inspector, a 
single Health Department Director and part-time Plumbing and Electrical Inspectors 
to effectively enforce State and Local regulations became evident. An Assistant 
Building Inspector was appointed in June, 1973, the Plumbing and Gas Inspector was 
made full time on May 26, 1972 and the Electrical Inspector in May, 1975. 

A new State Building Code became effective January 1, 1975, shifting from State 
personnel to the Town Building Inspector the responsibility for inspection of places 
of public assemblies, thereby increasing the Department's workload. 

The Town has been plagued for a number of years with problems arising out of 
the installation of sub-surface sewerage disposal systems. The Board of Health, 
starting in the Fall of 1974, reviewed its regulations governing sub-surface sewer- 
age disposal systems. After a lengthy and carefully detailed analysis, assisted by 
Dana Perkins and Sons, the Board approved a comprehensive set of regulations in 
July, 1975. These regulations are considered to be the most restrictive in the 
Commonwealth. It is believed that, through persistent enforcement of these regula- 
tions, property owners will be better protected from improper installations and 
the Town can more likely avoid for many years to come the extension of the sanitary 
sewerage system into the new subdivisions. 

As subsurface sewerage disposal regulations were being rewritten, the Health 
Department discontinued the services of a part-time sanitarian employed primarily 
for the inspection of subsurface disposal systems. This change eliminated any pos- 
sible conflict of interest, as this sanitarian from time to time provided consult- 
ing services for area builders. An Environmental Technician was appointed in August 
1974, to fill the void created by the discontinuance of the part-time sanitarian's 
services. As the workload increased with closer supervision of percolation tests 
and installations, the inspection program for food service establishments was slight- 
ed. To offset this deficiency, the Town took advantage of the CETA Program in Feb- 
ruary, 1975, and appointed a second Environmental Technician under this emergency 
program. 

Another area of substandard construction has been the construction of streets 
within subdivisions. Many miles of street have been constructed by various contrac- 

10 



tors. A large portion of these streets was well built. Construction in some, how- 
ever, has been border-line and in a few, substandard. In view of the substantial 
investment in these streets by the developer and the liability of the Town in accept- 
ing the streets, a tighter inspection program was inaugurated with the appointment 
of a General Construction Inspector in August, 1974. Some 28 subdivisions were in 
various stages of construction during the year of 1975. 

Town Offices 



With the assistance of the architectural firm of Johnson-Hotvedt and Associates, 
a relocation plan for Town offices was developed in 1974. During 1975, under the 
general supervision of General Construction Inspector James Rand and with local con- 
tractors and CETA personnel providing the labor, the Town Treasurer and Town Collec- 
tor's offices were consolidated on the south side of the Town Hall in what was form- 
erly the Town Clerk and Town Treasurer's offices. The Town Clerk was moved to the 
north side of the building in what was formerly the Town Collector's office and 
Recreation Department's office. Private offices were provided for the Town Treasurer 
and Town Clerk at the front of the building on their respective sides. These offices 
have been refurbished with new ceilings, improved lighting, paint and carpeted floors 

The room formerly used by the Police Department as a cell block on the first 
floor has been renovated as the printing facility. The multilith has been relocated 
from the second floor and installed there. 

DiLisio Construction Company, the low bidder on the concrete vault, has nearly 
completed a storage vault in the basement under the easterly section of the hall. 
Once completed, the Assessor's offices will be refurbished and a portion of the form- 
er Police Station and the former Town Treasurer's office will be renovated to provide 
offices for the Veterans' Services, now located on the second floor. Once these 
renovations are completed, the first-floor renovations will have been completed and 
work will commence on the second floor. 

Personnel Changes 



During this period Stanley Chlebowski, the popular long-time Highway Superin- 
tendent; John Campbell of the Water Department; and Alfred Zawojek of the Highway 
Department passed away. William Floyd of the Highway Department; Warren Maddox of 
the Police Department; and Alex Ritchie, the Electrical Inspector, have retired during 
the past eighteen months. 



Assistant Town Manager 



During this eighteen-month period, the Assistant Town Manager has found himself 
involved in several important areas. 

Budgeting 

Building on the Town Manager's work, Andover now has developed a detailed multi- 
year fiscal planning system which has already proved its value as a predictive tool 
of potentially great help in planning, programming and policy decisions. Although 
we are now able to make accurate estimates of our tax rate and operating expenses 
three years into the future, there is still a need to improve the Town's capital 
budgeting, completing this comprehensive approach to fiscal planning. 

Planning 

The Assistant Town Manager has spent a large part of his time in planning- 
related work. 

The resident opinion survey on the Central Business District, carried out with 
the Planning Board, was sent to every household in Andover early in 1975, with a 

11 






rate of return about 70 per cent. This survey, published in mid-1975, provided a 

broad range of opinion with high statistical significance on several important issue 

Perhaps the further value of the CBD survey has been that it has provided a sound an 

reliable model which may be followed where the townspeople's opinion is sought on 
other significant matters. 

The Assistant Town Manager also assisted the Recreation and Open Space Study 
Committee during several months in 1975 in its effort to develop a comprehensive 
multi-year plan. 

Following enactment of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, the 
Town's proposal for a rehabilitation loan and grant program for senior-citizen 
homeowners was formulated. 

With citizens appointed by the Board of Selectmen, the Assistant Town Manager 
participated actively for several months during 1975 in the Citizens Advisory Com- 
mittee on Oil Refinery Proposals. This Committee examined problems and possibilitie 
associated with the development of a refinery in the Town of Dracut . 

Also during this period, an application was filed for State assistance through 
the Self-Help Program in acquisition and development of the Doyle property, between 
High Plain Road and Lowell Street. However, the Self-Help fund has been almost ex- 
hausted at the same time as demand for funding across the Commonwealth has soared 

Transportation 

Several transportation-related issues have taken much of the Assistant Town 
Manager's time and effort. 

The proposal to develop an interchange at 1-93 in the Lowell Junction area has 
finally started to progress through the long and complicated transportation planning 
process after several years of immobility. The completion of this project in the 
next several years will relieve adverse traffic-related impacts in the southwest 
part of Andover and enhance industrial development in Lowell Junction. 

Following the direction of Town Meeting, the Assistant Town Manager has assis- 
ted the Town Manager in pursuing the Town's interest in commuter rail service with 
the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. 

Also locally, the Assistant Town Manager has worked with the Andover Bikeways 
as it has launched its efforts in 1975. 

On a regional basis, the Assistant Town Manager has served as the Town's repre- 
sentative to the Transportation Policy Advisory Group (TPAG) and Merrimack Valley 
Area Transit Study. In the TPAG, we were successful in having the Lowell Junction 
interchange ranked as a top priority for action in the Merrimack Valley region. We 
have also followed the establishment of the Merrimack Valley Regional Transit Author- 
ity awaiting the time when it may appear prudent for the Selectmen to join this 
agency . 

Ad ministration and Finance 

The Assistant Town Manager in this time was actively involved in preparations 
for collective bargaining with three employee bargaining units and then assisting 
the Town Manager and the Town's negotiator during the course of the process. This 
also involved attending several workshops on the new collective bargaining law in 
Massachusetts, which became effective July 1, 1974, and keeping abreast of statewide 
and national developments. 

Following several months of work in 1975, an employee committee (of which the 
Assistant Town Manager was a member) proposed a broad revision of the Town's 10-year 
old Personnel Rules and Regulations to the Town Manager. 

The Assistant Town Manager also was involved in launching the Town's partici- 
pation in programs under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) . This 

12 



program provided more than 45 workers of varied skills to the Town and School Depart- 
ment during this time. 

Since the presentation of the report of the Andover Computer Advisory Committee, 
the Assistant Town Manager has maintained contact with that group and has attempted 
to keep apace of development in computing which may be of interest and benefit to 
Andover . 

Essex County Advisory Board 

Since its organization in October of 1974, the Assistant Town Manager has served 
as Secretary of this statutory body. In its first year, the Essex County Advisory 
Board saw 93 per cent of its recommendations on the County budget for Fiscal Year 
1976 followed by the State legislature. The reduction of almost $l-million in the 
County budget meant a reduction in Andover's County tax assessment of approximately 
$40,000. 

Other Activities 

With the Town Manager and Director of Public Works, the Assistant Town Manager 
carefully monitored the progress of the Merrimack Wastewater Management Study and 
movement towards areawide waste treatment management planning under Section 208 of 
P.L. 92-500. 

In October of 1975, the Assistant Town Manager organized and guided the three- 
day visit of Councillor Lance Barrett, Mayor of Andover, England, and his family. 

The Assistant Town Manager helped in the successful application for a grant 
through the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission. 

Late in 1975, a successful application was submitted for a new ambulance 
through the State's Office of Emergency Medical Services involving a significant 
saving to the Town. 

In mid-1975, a limited campaign in connection with Operation Identification 
was undertaken, aimed at protecting property and reducing housebreaks . 



John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 



The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund dates back to Article 17 of the March 6th 
Town Meeting of 1893. An original bequest of $5,000.00 was to be administered by 
three Trustees chosen at the Annual Town Meeting. The income was to be used for the 
purchase of wood or coal for the worthy poor of Andover. 

On January 15, 1972, by vote of the Trustees, all of the funds were consolidated 
into the Andover Savings Bank. The income is accounted for by the Town Treasurer, 
and disbursement authorization is given by at least two Trustees. Because most home 
heating is now accomplished by oil the Fund has had little use in the past few years. 

Balance on hand July 1, 1974 $8,725.83 
Interest earned 74/75 477.02 

Balance on hand December 31, 

1975 $9,202.85 



13 



CETA Program 



With a sustained high unemployment in the Greater Lawrence area and in the 
Nation, the Emergency Employment Act program was reinstituted in Andover in the fall 
of 1974 c The program was designed to provide unemployed persons with transitional 
employment in jobs providing needed public services during times of high unemploy- 
ment. Two individuals were hired in October, 1974 as custodians in the School De- 
partment . 

The Emergency Employment Act was merged with a new program known as C E.T.A C 
(Comprehensive Employment and Training Act). This program focuses on areas of sub- 
stantial unemployment which was defined as 6,15% or greater. 

Nine positions were filled under the C.E.T.A. Program in December, 1974 and Jan- 
uary, 1975 o By the end of January, Theodore Brown was named Manpower Program Super- 
visor. Under his supervision, the employment level peaked in June, 1975 at 43 e By 
October, 1975 the State Manpower Director mandated that the services of C 5 E,T,A, per- 
sonnel be terminated after twelve months,, By February, Mr „ Brown was replaced by 
David Montella. It is anticipated that under the present program nearly all the 
C C E C T.A C employees will be laid off by June of 1976 „ 

The Town Manager feels that the Town can be proud of its participation in tbis 
program Over 40 employees were put to useful tasks within the various Town depart- 
ments. The following is a breakdown of the personnel by departments, together with 
the functions which they performed. 



D epartment 

Assessors 

D C P C W, 



D C P C W, 

D C P C W C 
D P c Wo 
DoP.W, 
D.P.W. 

Fire 

Health 

Library 



Personnel 
1 Assistant Assessor 
3 Survey Team Members 



Function 
Assistant to the Assessors 



4 Highway Laborers 

1 Maintenance Man 
1 Water Meter Reader 

1 Custodian 

2 Painters 

4 Dispatchers 

1 Environmental Technician 

2 Clerk-typists 



a) field work for 30 drainage 
projects 

b) survey and layout of High Plain 
Road and Cross Street reconstruc- 
tion project 

c) survey for new layout of Greenwood 
Road between Lowell Street and 
High Plain Road 

Drainage projects, sewer maintenance, 
etc . 

General maintenance 

Reading meters 

Treatment Plant 

Painted exterior and interior of six 
pumping stations, trim on old pumping 
station, interior of Water Department 
garage 

Dispatch of Fire Department vehicles 
and cler cal work 

Inspection of food-service facilities,; 
sub-surface sewage inspection, etc. 

Clerical 



14 



Library 
Recreation 

Recreation 
School 

School 
School 
School 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 



1 Custodian 

1 Recreation Program 
Supervisor 

1 Maintenance Man 

6 Assistants 

5 Custodians 

1 Maintenance Man 

3 Painters 



1 Supervisor 



1 Clerk-typist 

2 Painters 



Custodial duties 

Set up recreation activities, gym- 
nastic programs and trips 

Maintenance of buildings and grounds 

Teaching, library and clerical as- 
sistance 

Custodial duties 

General Maintenance 

Interior of Stowe School, portion of 
interior of Sanborn, lockers at South, 
interior of a portion of West and a 
portion of East Junior High School 

Responsible for the supervision of en- 
tire program plus administrative as- 
sistance tasks 

Clerical - Town Manager's Office 

Interior and exterior of Police 
Station, exterior of Central Fire 
Station, exterior of the Town Hall 
(trim) , interior of first floor of 
Town Hall, interior and exterior of 
Ballardvale Fire Station, portion of 
interior of Memorial Hall Library, 
ornamental guardrail on North Main 
Street and guardrail posts on several 
roads . 



Town Counsel 



On July 1, 1974, thirty-six (36) cases were pending 



During the time period covered by this report, twenty-two (22) new cases arose 
as follows: 

6 Appellate Tax Board 

2 Civil Service 

4 Contract 

2 Injunction 

2 Zoning Appeals 

6 Other 

During this same period, twenty-two cases were terminated. 

Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State and Federal Courts and 
Administrative Boards. 

Written legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town Officials on 105 
occasions . 

A major portion of Town Counsel's work during this period was concerned with 
the Town's new Water Treatment Plant. Town Counsel's office handled various con- 
tract disputes, claims for statutory direct payment, litigation concerning the Gen- 
eral Contractor's Performance Bond, and conducted negotiations with the Maryland 



15 



Casualty Bonding Company which resulted in this matter being successfully closed 
out at no additional cost to the Town. 

Town Counsel was also deeply involved with matters concerning the West Andover 
Industrial District, including legal research, conferences with Town Officials and 
attorneys for Arkwright-Boston Company, and the preparation and recording of all 
legal documents necessary to effect the Eminent Domain proceedings required in the 
Town of Andover and the City of Lawrence in order to establish the West Andover 
Trunk Sewer Line. Town Counsel's office also drafted, revised and prepared all 
legal agreements and documents necessary to obtain the Conservation Grants and Con- 
servation Easements located along the Merrimack River Bank in the West Andover In- 
dustrial District . 

Town Counsel was present at Town Hall for conferences with Town Officials on 
an almost daily basis. Telephone conferences with various Town Officials, which 
often resulted in the rendering of oral legal opinions, occurred on approximately 
three hundred and seventy-five (375) occasions. 

During the period covered by this report, Contracts were drawn and reviewed, 
and numerous deeds, releases, and agreements were drafted, reviewed and recorded. 



Town Clerk 



1 - 


- 2,211 


2 - 


- 1,153 


3 - 


- 2,033 



The total number of registered voters in Andover was 13,221 as of December 
31, 1975. The registered voters by precinct were as follows: 

4 -- 3,410 

5 — 1,244 

6 — 3,170 

The following Statistical and Financial Reports are for the period from July 
1, 1974 to December 31, 1975 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Number of births recorded: 336 

Males 182 

Females 154 

Number of marriages recorded: 468 

Number of deaths recorded: 259 

Males 112 

Females 147 

The number of dog licenses sold was 3,016. The total amount collected was 
$10,390.00 all of which was submitted to the Town Treasurer. Of this amount 
$1,574.60 was retained by the Town and the balance sent to the County Treasurer. 

The number of Fishing and Hunting licenses sold was 1,395. The total amount 
collected was $10,055.30. Of this amount $330.55 was submitted to the Town 
Treasurer and retained by the Town. The balance was sent to the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game. 

16 



Other monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Intentions $1,232.00 

Certified copies - Vital Statistics 1,314.00 

Uniform Commercial Code recorded 2,493.00 

Miscellaneous Licenses (Common vict . , 1,596.00 
Auctioneers, etc.) 

Alcoholic Beverage Licenses 38,025.00 

Business Certificates 73.00 

Miscellaneous (Storage of inflammables, 3,297.25 
street lists, Maps, etc.) 

Total monies collected was $68,475.55. Of this amount $58,750.80 was turned 

over to the Town Treasurer and $9,724.75 was sent to the Division of Fisheries and 
Game . 

STREET LISTING 

Street Listing Massachusetts statutes require that an annual street listing of all 



voter age residents be taken in each city and town as of January 1, of each year. 
In cooperation with the school department a full listing was taken in 1975, for the 
first time, to include all members of each household. This was done to eliminate 
a separate school census. In doing so duplicate costs and efforts were avoided. The 
total census provides pertinent information to all town boards as well as the school 
department. It is our intention to have one town oriented door to door canvas to be 
taken in January and February of each year. 

1975 STATE CENSUS 

1975 State Census When the voters of Massachusetts overwhelmingly approved the 
House Cut Amendment that appeared on the November 1974 ballot, a census was mandated 
in order to assist in the accurate redrawing of legislative district lines. When 
the number of House members is cut from 240 to 160, the new districts will be based 
on this census. Each city and town was to appoint a Municipal Census Director to 
direct the taking of the census. In Andover the Town Clerk was appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen to serve in this capacity. The statute mandated March 1, 1975 
as the day of the census and this meant that the Assistant Registrars would have to 
begin again and canvas the entire town as they had just completed for the street 
listing or it could be done by mail with a follow-up by a limited number of Regis- 
trars. It was decided that the census be done by mail and upon its completion the 
total count resulted in 26,050 and this number was certified by the Secretary of 
State in December, 1975. 

REDISTRICTING 

Redistricting In 1935 Andover divided into six voting precincts. There has been 
no further redistr icting since that time. In forty years of growth and development 
the six precincts became understandably lopsided as to the number of residents in 
each precinct. When it became apparent that a census would be taken to draw new 
legislative district lines, it was decided by the Board of Selectmen to have the 
town redistricted. The responsibility of redistricting was assigned to the Town 
Clerk. Based on the 1975 State Census, the precincts of Andover were increased 
from six to eight with the redistricting. The final plan was submitted to the Local 
Election District Review Commission and it was approved by them on August 22, 1975. 
These new precincts will take effect in 1977 commencing with the Town elections. 

Precinct One 

Bordered by: 1. the No. Andover town line on the east side; 2. the center line 
of Highland Road from the No. Andover town line to Main Street; 3. the center line 
of Main Street from Highland Road to Elm Street; 4. the center line of Elm Street 
from Main Street to the No. Andover town line. 

17 



Precinct Two 






Bordered by: 1. the center line of Main Street from Hidden Road to Lowell Street; 
2. the center line of Lowell Street from No. Main Street to Reservation Road; 3. 
the center line of Reservation Road from Lowell Street to Andover Street; 4. the 
center line of Central Street from Andover Street to Phillips Street; 5. the center 
line of Phillips Street from Central Street to Abbot Street; 6. the center line of 
Abbot Street from Phillips Street to Porter Road; 7. the center line of Porter Road 
from Abbot Street to Hidden Road; 8. the center line of Hidden Road from Porter Roa 
to Main Street . 

Precinct Three 

Bordered by: 1. the No. Andover town line on the east side; 2. the center line of? 
Elm Street from the No. Andover town line to Main Street; 3. the center line of 
No. Main Street from Elm Street to Haverhill Street; 4. the center line of Haverhil 
Street from No. Main Street to the No. Andover town line. 

Precinct Four 

Bordered by: 1. the center line of Haverhill Street from the No. Andover town line 
to No. Main Street; 2. the center line of Lowell Street from No. Main Street to 
Route 1-93; 3. the center line of Route 1-93 from Lowell Street to Route 1-495; 

4. the center line of Route 1-495 from Route 1-93 to the Lawrence city line; 5. 
the No. Andover town line and Lawrence city line on the east side. 

Precinct Five 

Bordered by: 1. the City of Lawrence on the east and northeast side; 2. the Town 
of Methuen to the north and northwest; 3. the Town of Tewksbury on the southwest 
side; 4. the center line of Route 1-93 from the Tewksbury town line to Route 1-495; 

5. the center line of Route 1-495 from Route 1-93 to the Lawrence city line. 

Precinct Six 

Bordered by: 1. the center line of Lowell Street from Reservation Road to Route 
1-93; 2. the center line of Route 1-93 from Lowell Street to the Tewksbury town 
line; 3. the Boston and Maine railroad tracks from the Tewksbury town line to the 
intersection of Andover Street, Reservation Road and Central Street; 4. the center 
line of Reservation Road from Andover Street to Lowell Street. 

Precinct Seven 

Bordered by: 1. the Boston & Maine railroad tracks from the Tewksbury town line to 
the intersection of Andover Street, Reservation Road and Central Street; 2. the 
center line of Central Street from the aforementioned intersection to Phillips 
Street; 3. the center line of Phillips Street from Central Street to Abbot Street; 
4. the center line of Abbot Street from Phillips Street to Porter Road; 5. the 
center line of Porter Road from Abbot Street to Hidden Road; 6. the center line of 
Hidden Road from Porter Road to So. Main Street; 7. the center line of So. Main 
Street from Hidden Road to Route 125 by-pass; 8. the center line of Route 125 by- 
pass from So. Main Street to Harold Parker Road; 9. the center line of Harold 
Parker Road from Route 125 by-pass to the No. Andover town line; 10. the south side 
bordered by the town lines of Wilmington and No. Reading. 

Precinct Eight 

Bordered by: 1. the No. Andover town line on the east side; 2. the center line of 
Harold Parker Road from the No. Andover town line to Route 125 by-pass; 3. the 
center line of Route 125 by-pass from Harold Parker Road to So. Main Street; 4. the 
center line of So. Main Street from Route 125 by-pass to Highland Road; 5. the 
center line of Highland Road from So. Main Street to the No. Andover town line. 



18 



w 


LO 


o 


r^ 


is 


*• — 


3 


i— i 

CO 


<fl 


^ 


pu 


CM 




t-1 


W 




r-l 




H 




H 




H 




5 




H 




co 




Q 




Pk 




a 




^ 






CO 


CO 


H 


a 


53 


O 


W 


M 


S 


H 


W 


Ph 


H 




3 


X 


<! 


w 




Q 




w 




H 




C J 


m 


w 


r~- 


r-l 


\. 


r-l 


-d" 


O 


r^- 


o 




Q 




B 




H 


m 


I— 1 


r^ 


§ 


<t 


d 


r^- 


o 




w 




u 


<t 


25 


r-- 


3 


■— i 


m 


r^- 



* NCO o 

o oo on m 

m cm t-^ in 
r^ co r^ cm 
oo m o i-i 

i-i r^ <r 

O tOl£! 
O H CM 

NO 

■co- 



nO O O 

r^ -d- on 

vj3 i-l O 

o no o 

N VD CO 



O CM O 

ON CO 00 

in <t cm 

M N 00 

<t o <-> 

r-~ oo cm 

en t>- 



O oo on in 

P1NOH 

<fOrlO\ 

cm r^ cm <|- 

i-l CO -d" N0 

in m i-i 
co no m 

NO 00 CM 

m 
<o- 



o NMn 

m o on no 

oo id o <f 

N H OD N 

cm co co r~ 

COrlN 

m r^ i-i 

r>» o m 



NO 

on 





(1) 
CO 
•H 


cfl 

H 


CO 


O 

X 

w 


>-, CO 


eg 


■U 0) 


X 


^ X 


cd 




0) CO 


H 


CU 


a, H 




I-I 


o 


0) 


o 


U i-l 


■U 


■H 


FH CO 



w 
►J 



CO fi 
fi <! 



U U 
CU cO 
P-i Pk 



CM 


CO 


in r-» 


m 


i—i 


oo 


ON -d" 


00 


CM 


CO CM 


CO 


NO 


in 


r». no 
















NO 


oo 


co on 


r--. 


ON 


o> 


r-~ i-4 


m 


NO 


o co 


m 


CO 


CO 


no o 


o 


NO 


-J- CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO <j- 


CO 


NO 


O .-I 


no 




oo 


CM <fr 


r-l 


i-l 
NO 


ON <t- 






CO 

I-l 


1-1 




-co- 


-co- 






-CO- 


■CO- 



CM 
00 

m 

CM 

l-« 

CM 
■CO- 



CM 



o 

CU 

a. 

CO 



On 

ON 

on 
o 
on i 



oo o 
oo -d- 

i-i r^ 
i-i i-i 
-d- oo 

m o 

CO CM 
CO- 



o 


ON 


00 


CM 






-d- 


CM 


co 


CM 




NO 



co 

CO 

ON 

NO 

m 
-co- 



r-» oo 


O 


NO 


i-l 


NO ON 


00 


i-~ 


CM 


CO NO 


00 


<t 


<t- 


o i-» 


oo 


>ct 


iH 


r-- on 


no 


CM 


NO 










ON CO 


CO 




r-~ 


-d- 00 






CO 


i-i 
-co- 






CM 
•CO- 



ON 


NO 


f~ NO 

O NO 


co 
o 


m 
o 


Csl 

CO 


o 
i-i 


ON 

r-- 

NO 


<t 
-d- 

CM 


NO 00 
r-l CM 
O CM 


ON 

00 
00 


-d- 
o 


<t 

ON 


CM 

i-l 
00 


-cl- 
in 


O 

00 

no 
■co- 


o -d- 
no -ci- 
in ON 

1-1 
1-1 
-co- 




CO 

O 
m 


m 
m 


NO 

O 

CO 

I-l 

-co- 



O 


o\ 


O VD 


O 


o 


r^- 


CO 


-d- 


in 


CM 00 


o 


-d- 


r^ 


CM 


CO 


CO 


r-i vO 


C7\ 


m 


i-i 


-ct- 


NO 


v£> 


cn m 


00 


^o 


O 


co 


v£> 


CO 


vO 00 


00 


'-O 


CM 


CM 


vO 


-d- 


<D CO 




CO 


r^- 


CM 


v£> 


i—i 


i^ m 




i-i 


m 


O 




-d- 


r^ r^. 




m 




i-l 


















co 


i-i 








CO 




i-i 


i-i 








1-1 




<n- 


■co- 








-co- 



m 
o 

-d-" 
cn 

CM I 











CO 












<D 












X 








Qi 




cd 








01 




H 


CO 






•r-l 






4J 




CO 


O 


CO 


>> 


c 




CI) 


X 


CI) 


4J 


<u 




X 


W 


X 


U 


i= 




CO 




cfl 


<u 


U) 




H 


CU 


H 


Cu 


U) 


m 




7-1 




o 


cu 


r^ 


<U 


u 


i-i 


u 


CO 


C7N 


4-1 


•H 


CO 


P-, 


CO 


^H 


cfl 


x: 


B 




< 


-^, 


4-1 


CU 


•r-l 


r-l 




vt 


CO 


> 


(3 


CO 


t-1 


l-» 


W 




< 


G 


co 


C^ 




u 




o 


■H 


l-l 


rH 





p 


CO 


U 




CO 


4J 


i_i 


U 


Cu 


r^ 


d) 





CO 


0) 


ft 


> 


od X 


Pn 


Pm 


c/) 


w 












H-l 













CO 


CO 


co 
o 


o 
o 


CO 
O 


m 

CO 


m 

CM 


r-l 

oo 


035. 


O 
ON 


i-i 


CO 

i-i 
-co- 


CO 
■CO- 


r-l 


-d- 

•00- 



CM 


in 


o 


r-l 


r^ 


v£> 


• 


• 


• 


m 


i-i 


r-l 


CM 


CO 


l-». 


-d- 


o 


r-l 








ON 


CO 




■co- 







ON N O 

t — I I — >-o 

O r-l i—l 

co vo m 

m o co 

n « », | 

-d- r-i r-i 



-d- 

oo 

CM 

^£> 

CM 

r-l 

<o- 



in r-i 


o 


O 


m 


r-l 


co -d- 


<r 


o 


00 


o 


o r- 


ON 


1-1 


v£> 


m 


on oo 


t-i 


CO 


CO 


VD 


cm -d- 


CM 


1—1 


CO 


-d- 












ON I-l 


r-- 




<f 


CM 


r-l r^ 








o 


CO 








St 


<o- 








-co- 



O CM 

o m 

CM NO 
CO CO 

m 



-d- 

CM 


in 
m 


o 
-d- 


o 
o 


NO 


m 

CO 


CM 

O 

NO 


CM 
00 
CO 


i~» 

t-i 


CO 
r-l 


r-l 


m 


r* 


n 


A 




r- 


#* 


o 
-d- 
co 


NO 


ON 




<t 


r— i 

NO 

co 


-co- 










■CO- 









cu 








a) 


X 








CO 


cO 








•H 


H 


CO 






y 


CU 


4J 




CO 


X 


>-. CO 


d 




cu 


w 


■U -H 


0) 




X 




u o 


Fi 




CO 




cu X 


CO 




H 


a) 


a. w 


CO 






r-i 


o 


OJ 




CU 


y 


U r-l 


CO 




4-1 


•rt 


P-i CO 


CO 


oo 


cd 


x 


B 


< 


Pi 


4J 


cu 


r-l -H 




< 


CO 


> 


to a 


I-l 


w 


W 




a < 


CO 


!H 




u 


O 


•H 




1-4 


o 


2 g 


u 


Pi 


CO 


4-1 


cu 


O 


(U 


o 


0) cO 


p- 


rH 


Pi 


s 


P-i fe 


co 


Pi 










Pm 











i-i o r>- 
r-i -ct -cl- 
in <f <t 

CO r-l O 

cm in oo 

<t in no 

CM CM r-l 

<t 



CO 
ON 



cu 

§ 
*-} 

CO 
CO 
i* 

CO 
CU 

s 



T3 

cu 
o 

r-4 

o 



u 
cu 

> 

O 





m 


oo co 


o 










cfl 






m 


NO 00 


<t 










rJ 






i-i 


-d- co 


CM 










1 






CO 


r^ no 


-d- 
















I s * 


<t m 


NO 










o 






n 


#% * 


















o> 


o -d- 


m 










1 






<t 


<t -d- 


<t 
















CM 


oo i-i 


Oi 


















r\ * 


rt 
















m 


-d" CM 


r-- 










Cfl 






<o- co ■ ■ ) 


<o- 










cu 




















X 


T3 






1 












cfl 


OJ 


















H 


B 










in 






00 




cu 










r^ 






c 


cw 


cu 






m 




ON 






•1-1 


O 


X) 






r^ 




r-i 






h 




CU 




-d 


- 




\ 






cfl 


C 


u 




r-- 


m --. 




-d- 






ifi 


O 






■-^^ 


K -d- 




i-^ 




CO 


CO 


•r-l 


(U 




r-l 


on r>» 


m 


ON 




TJ 




4-1 


S-J 




-^ 


i— i - 


r^ 


r-l 




3 


CU 


CO 


cu 




r^ 


--^ 


-^ 






3 


3 


Pu 


3 






<t co 


r-i 


T3 


CO 


Pn 


C 


•r-l 






CU 


r^ 4J 


CO 


cu 


T3 




CU 


o 


Cfl 




CJ 


ON fi 


\ 


c 


a 


cu 


> 


•r-l 


CU 




a 


i-l cu 


CM 


U 


3 


3 


CU 


4J 


rH 




cfl 


B 


i-l 


cfl 


fe 


3 


Pi 


C 


4-1 


• • 


H 


CO cu 




W 




CU 




<! 


•H 


Pi 


CO 


4-1 Cfl 






cu 


> 


r-i 




H 




pq 


(X U 


cu 


4J 


3 


CU 


« 


fi 




pq 




■H 3 


o 


Cfl 


3 


Pi 


5-1 


•r-i 


X 


5 


X! 


CU X> 


c 


CU 


cu 


1 


CU 




cfl 


C^J 


co 


O cfl 


CO 


r-l 


> 


fi 


•n 


co 


H 


< 


cO 


a) -iH 


i—l 


OJ 


cu 


O 


<u 


C 




1 


CJ 


Pi p 


cfl 


4-1 


Pi 


a 


Pei 


CO 


X 






W 


c 








O 


•H 


H 








M 








rJ 


CO 



19 



o 

CO 
</> 

</> 

</> 
< 



o 


o 


o 




"* 





•> 


0) 


CM 


n) 


00 





m 


U 


- 


o 


00 


a 


<*}• 


•H 


SH 


G cn 


o 


cd h 




aS 





- <D 


03 


«tf >> 


rt 


IM 





i> a) 


Sh 


« > 





Tfl -H 


a 


^ SH 


•H 


H 




-+-> 


c 


O 03 


Pi 


rH Kj 




<v9- a 


03 







03 


-p 


Ri J3 


rt 


■5 p 


U 




•H 


>> bfl 


73 


P> c 


C 


U -H 


•H • 


Sh 


o 


a 3 


O l> 


O TS 


O 05 


Sh 


m ih 


a-* 


- 


CM 


co 0) 


rH CO 


m cj 


«S - 


m g 


g m 


-•H 


rH 


o en 


03 CO 


CO 


u - 


CM O 


IN 


<=6-o 


cum- 


t> 




SH - 


SH 


CD 


rH O 


00 


£3 


a> o 


si 


3 - 


X 03 


i-4 rH 


a si 


BS ■* 


+-> 


> #3- 


Sh 




iH CJ 


TJ SH 


rH G 


<D O 


CJ -H 


ra 




03 


SH rH 


03 


O si 


03 Bi 


p 


03 


O 


a u 


3 -P 


o 


r-< 


c 


sS sS 


4-> -H 


> 


b5 


T3 


+-> iH 


T3 G 


cn a 


SS 


p 


03 


o 


03 rH 


r-i 4-> 


Kj 


BS 


03 


Bi 


03 >> 


u 


a 


T5 


03 


- G 


- 3 


m a 


in o 


t> 


O -H 


ai sh 


Ci > 


ih d 


rH 





Sh 


- >> 


- ft 


rH 


rH 


03 





>. 3 


>>G 


h 


Sh -P 


a -h 


cd 


3 > 


3 Sh 


C 


G 


sS Sh 


K] > 


!-5 a 


>-3 





"* 


,c .g 


JC in 


H p 


H CT> 


Sh 


IN 





m 


> 


^ 


O 


&>■ 





OtCO^ 


O 


m m 




^NON 


o 


Tf tN 




i> t> m in 




• r-i 


cn 


r. - - x 


r-{ 


co - 


t> 


00 -tf CO 00 


m 


■rt< CO 


CD 


tj< m o> 




in 


rH 


rH in CD 




- 


| 


- - ~ 




CO 


>< 


o o o 




1-^ 


Ph 


rH CO •<* 
(N CM 








<V3^<V*<y3- 





CO O O 

CO (N O 

NNO 

oo o m 

l> O CM 

rH o m 

m cd 



<&■&■&■ 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

M>00HMO00rfNM0 

rHCNrHtNin^COOCDOOO 
00C0rHt~rHOmOrHCMI> 

oo m m o m cm co m co o> 



cn 

(N 



IN 



00 «tf 



ct*\ fr\ £/x rf\ rt\ £JX ff\ tr\ rf\ ff\ c/\ 

W \/7 W 77 tr^ V7 \J? XT? t77 ^7V^ t/y 



l> o o o 


o 


oo o 


00 o o o 


o 


O <N 


Tf 00 rH a> 


• 


• ^ 


n n » n 


CO 


^ - 


00 rH rH <N 


in 


in cd 


ON H 




i> 


CD O l> 




•> 


». ». ~ 




CO 


Oi CN rH 




rH 


CM CO 






CM N 






&■&■<&■<& 





00 o o 

oo oo o 

o ** m 

"* 00 IN 

00 rH rH 

(M CD CD 

in in 



&>■&■&■ 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

t>t>t>rHCOCOCj)Tt<i>rH0O 

HM^Ninoiaiocoifloo 
oocooorHoocoorHcoin 
comrf omiNcoinoicn 



oo 

CN 



CM 



<-i m t? 



*r^ j*^i p/\ ft\ rf\ rf\ ?r\ rr\ rr\ r/*\ /*/*\ 

\JJ TTT w w^ ^XT TTT TTT ^TT w wy V7 



t> o o o 


o 




CD O O O 


o 


in cd 


O rH 00 O 


• 


CD O 


^ .. ^ ^ 


CD 


• oo 


oo en cd in 


"# 


m - 


CM CD CJ5 




i-h in 


oo m co 




r-i 


^ ». .N 




~ 


l> 00 CD 




00 


oo o 




r-i 


r-i r-i 






&■&■&■&■ 





o m o 

o co o 

i-t t-\ o 
t> CD O 

m o m 
m cm co 

"<tf CO 



<w-<^-^- 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

t^OO-^rHinCMOi'^OirHO 
rHrHrH(MINCDa5O-*C01> 

oocooot>»oomorHoo 
oomcM -^mcMcoincMco 



CM 



CM 



CD CM 



ef\ rf\ <*n rf\ cr\ pf\ ff\ er\ cf\ c/\ cf\ 

\fj <X/ TTT 7^T tT^T tyy 77 TTT TTT TTT XrT 



co m 
co o 

• 00 

o 
m 



rf 



CD 00 
CO 00 

• l> 

CO 
00 

o 



o 

CM 
CD 

CO 

















03 03 03 




















03 G G 




















BS 03 O O 




















§ G -H -H 




















-P 4-> 





















=H-H CS C3 






O 














+-> N N 






•H 




>> 


G 








03 Bi -H -H 






> 




4-> 


O 


T3 






x: N G G 






Sh 




TJ U 


•H 









+J P -H cS BS ft 














-P 


03 






BS rH G bC bD -H 






CO 




03 a 


bS 


03 






-P BS Bi r( ?H G 






>> 


-P 


03 O 


3 


-D 






K3 bDO O 03 






+-> CJ 


ft 


in 


rH 


03 






^ u u 






•H -H 


g 


03 P* +-> 


BS 


03 03 


Q 




w 


TO G O -P 






HH-P 


■P 


03 Kj 


> 


03 < 


H 




iz; 


O H C& 






O ^2 O 


ft X 


<d rH +-> 







Ch 


^^ 


o 


-P S >>£} 






jG 3 -H 


g m 


BJ 03 


o 


03 03 


Z 


/^ 03 


r- 1 


•H g Sh 01 rH 03 






P ft Sh 





03 G H 


O 


03 bfi 


<C 


>> G 


S 


G O BS +-> O 3 






3 -P 


X 03 


+J 


O 


< G 


C4 


r-i C$ ss 


ID O Sh -H > 






< d 03 


H P 


G 03 rH 


- 


•H 


O 


U U T3 


s 


^1 -H 






•H 


G 


3 Jh rt 


G r-{ 


03 <-< 




G 


w 


-P S3 G bfi 






be O Q 


03 3 


Eh 


O 


#3- 


r-{ 


CZ3 


TS -P -H 


X 


££'H£ -H 






G H 


O 


prj 


O ft K 


•H 


U 


|Zi 


rH rH 


H 


■P -P ij O CQ rH 






•H Kj 


Sh CJ 


O 





■P iH 


5= 


O 


W > CQ 











03 -P 


O CJ 


ft 


< 1 1 


BS 


< Q 


h- 1 


V.-'^^'V.^ 


w 


<H <H «H tH =H PS 






3 3 «H 


<c < 


w 




3 ft 




& 




H 


O o o o 


Cfi 


0) 


O ft O 




rt 


'H G G 


T— 1 


=H tH 


rH CM » 


<! 


«H 








S3 


SH SH 




O O O 


b5 





s 


■* CM CO 


H 


>>>>>>>>,>> o 


be 


•H 


>> >> 


o o 


>H 


•H -H 


> -P 




w 




C/3 


+-> P -P -P 4J 


Bi 


Sh 


Sh -P P 




C4 


5h +^ -P 


bS 


ri ^ 


X 





W 


Sh Sh Sh Sh ?h 03 


G 





Sh Sh 


Sh U 


<fl 


B3 b5 


<-< C£j 





w 


03 03 03 










4- 1 


> 





S 


,0 3 3 


nS 


X! X2 




3 3 3 


HH 


ft ft ft ft ft 03 


03 





O ft ft 


£3 X3 


s 


Ehh 


•P X 


S S 


X 


bS bS bS 


<u 


O O O 3 


Sh 


g T! O 


g g 


& 


3 k5 aJ 


O as 


3 3 


<u 


r-t r-t rH 


H 


U Sh Sh U U O 


Bi 





G U U 


3 3 


CQ 


» > > Eh Eh 


■z; !z; 


Eh 


o OO 


as 


ftftftftftKftO<ftft 


iz; jz; 



20 





HOMMO 




*oono 




t> . . . . 




-O CD i—l CO 


CD 


oo h h m to 


[^ 


rH CD 00 CD 


CD 


^ >. ^ 


iH 


O O CM 


1 


cd oo r> 


>H 


t- o 


fe 


- ~ 




00 iH 




1—1 




#3-£6-#3-W 



<M O l> l> O 

l> O "# CD O 



lO 


-O H CM CD 


t> 


O ■* CD m CD 


CD 


rH CD O CM 


rH 


r, - ^ 


1 


CM CD CM 


!* 


in oo m 


Ph 


CM 00 



&■&■&■*& 



o o 
o o 


O 
O 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 
in m 


O 
O 
O 


<tf o 
CM O 

O rH 


CO CD 

m cd 


in 

o 


■* CD 
<tf CM 

rH 00 


O 00 

oo oo 

CM rH 


CM 


o o 

rH 


#5-^3- 


&■ 


&■&■ 



o 
o 

CM 
CO 

in 

rH 
CO 

CM 



m- 



CD O 


rH 


in 


o 










o o 


00 CD 


o 










o • 


• 


• 


• 










-CO 


rH CD 


CO 










in cm 


CD 


CD CD 










rH CM 


CD 


CD 












- 


•> 










>> >> 




CM 


00 


rH 








P +-> 




CM 


00 


m 








Jh !h 




CD 


t> 















- 












a a 




00 












o o 




rH 








CD 





u u 





m- w «3- t-i 


-P P 


cn 


ft A 


cn 










cd aS 


cd 




CCS 










P +-> 





rH rH 













cn CD 


u 


CCS CCS 


in 










W H 


o 

3 


3 3 

o o 


O 
3 










rH rH 


h- 1 


cn cn 


rH 










CCS CCS 




u u 












CD CD 

















PS PS 

1 1 




ft ft 

1 1 










3 


1 1 

CD 




1 1 












o 


3 3 




3 3 




T3 






•H 


H rH 




rH rH 











+-> 


CCS C(J 




CCS CCS 




W 






as 


i> > 




> > 




cn 






3 

















rH 


X3 T3 




-O 73 




03 






a 


CD 









CO 






> 


CO CO 




cn cn 




< 






o 


co cn 






cn cn 






cn 3 






o 


cn cn 




cn cn 




CO o 






o 


cn cn 




cn cn 




rH -H 






- 


< < 




<3 <a 




o +-> 






H 










■H CCS 






#3- 


CD 




CD 




s: 3 








l> 




t> 




rH 






H 


CD 




CD 




> a 






CD 


rH O 




rH O 




> 




en Pi 


1 t> 




1 o 




«H 




p 




>h CD 




>i CD 




O "O 




3 


CD 


rH rH 




pH rH 









CD 


P 










5h CO 


CD 


E 


cd 










CD Cfl 


en 


CD PS 










.Q 01 


•H 


p 












E W 


o 


CTJ 


X 










3 en 


X £> 


cd 










[z; < w <! H 











00 



m o o 

CD O CD 


m 

CM 


CO O CD 
C^ O CD 

m o t> 


00 
00 


o o r~ 

oo o oo 
m cm 


oo 

rH 

00 


t> rH 

rH 


00 

rH 


#3-#3-C£- 


&■ 


■H m o 

00 CD O 


CD 


CM CD O 

00 rH O 
00 O O 


CM 

o 

CD 


•*. ^ «s 




cd m co 

CM CD CM 


o 
m 
co 



in 



#3-#3-££- 



ririO 
00 CD O 

CD 00 l> 
■* 00 00 
00 rH O 

oo ^ co 

00 00 CD 
CD 00 



CM 



fcuo 
3 

•H 

bfiP 
3 

•H 

p § 


3 

m & 

o 

O rH 
H CCS 

3 

rH a 

a 3 
3 < 

3 

3 +-> 
<1 



CO u 
bJD ccS 



c 

H 
P 

CO 







ccS 

•H 
CJ 


ft 



cd cd 



p co cn 

Cd T3 T3 
3 3 

■D 3 3 
«H «H 
> 



f-H rH rH 
ft£l X! 

ft cd cd 

Cd rH rH 



cn 

3 

O 
•H 
P 

cd 

•H 

rH 
ft 
O TD 

U 

ftp 

ft o 

<: > 



E E 

o o 

U rH 



co 



#3- 



CM 
CM 

m 

CM 

o 

00 

in 

CM 
CM 



a 

w 

<; 

M 

PS 

ft 
o 
PS 
ft 
ft 
< 



o 






xn 



o oo 

oo o 

rH m 

cm m 

iH CD 

CM O 

CO CM 

CO rH 



O I> 

rH CM 

rH 00 

i m co 

I CM co 



o 
oo 

CO 
CM 



TT? TTT \s? w 13j \Jj 



O CD 

in t}< 

co o 

oo i> 

co m 

■* CO 

CO CM 

CD rH 



cd m 

m co 

CM CM 

rH <tf 

00 I> 

00 



o 

CM 

CD 
O 
00 



£f\ it\ rr\ rr\ rf*\ r/*\ 

Xrw" XTJ t77 V7 XT? tT^r 



CD CD O O CO 
r^ CD CD o m 


o 

rH 


O O CD CM I> 

m i> cm cd m 

l> O rH rH 00 


CD 
CM 

rH 


CD CD CD rH 
O 00 


CM 



xrr ttt ttt xnr tt? 




ifr 











E 













cd 










rH 


U 










•H 


b£ 










P 


O 













rH 










PS ft 










rH 












cd 












-p 












3 























E 


E 













3 










P 


H 










CO 













>> 


> 








cn 


w 











+-> 




o 








3 


p 










3 


C! 


>> 








O 





1— 1 











£ 


rH 








O 














< 


U 

•H 


T3 

rH 








rH 


P 


H 








cd 









w 


cn 


ftPS 







H 


cd 


•H 




P 




rH 





CJ 


«H 


cd 




•H 


u 


•H 


o 


p 




CQ 


< 


3 




M 








3 


3 


I 




X 


3 s: 


O 







cd 


o 




•H 







Eh 


•H 


tp. 


+■> 


3 






P 





cd 


cd 







cd 




3 


M 




^< 





P 


■H 


3 




o 


X !h 


•H 


s 


CO 




•H 


cd O 


T3 


cd 


3 




-3 


Eh 


3 


X 


H 







PS < w 






> 


>> 






* 






p 








4-J 




r4 


3 P 


4-> 


P 


rH 




o 


3 cd 


OS 


cd 


cd 




+J 


O P 


■H 


-P 







o 


UWMWK 




s 



21 





CO 


t- c^ o 




00 


t> i> o 




rH 


oom o 


CO 


© 


1 0*(D 


1> 


© 


i in^o 


OS 


- 


1 „ .. „ 


rH 
1 


CO 


CN CM CO 
(M CO 


>H 






Ph 







rf\ rr\ cf\. rf\ rr\ 

77 77 tr? 77 77 



CM 
CD 

m 

f— i 

CM 

CM 
(M 

00 



se- 



en 



i 

co 



CO 
CD 

in 
o 

CM 
© 
l> 



w- 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
TfOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

©OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
CMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I 

^foooooooooomoooLn i 
• • - - - I 

comocoioomcoi— iiOi— loorfin 

ffltDN HHW rH CN 

© CD CD rH 

CN 



c/t rf\ rr\ ef~\ r.f\ cr\ rf\ cr\ rf\ rr\ r/\ cd. /*/") rr\ rr\ rr\ f/~\ 

77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 



o 
o 



■* 



o 

CO 



CM 



o 


CM 


l> 


CO 


in 


CD 



iO 


O 


o 


o o 


in 


CI 


CO 


o 


o 


O 


00 


rH 


0J 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


05 


c 


o 


o 


oo 


w 


■> 


c 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


t>- 


o 


m 


in 


X 


in 


CO 


o 


~r 


•<* 


o- 


rH 




N 


CM 


CM 


00 



<& <& 



ff\ ff\ ff\ rr\ rf\ 
77 77 77 77 77 



<& 



CD © CO O CO 
■^ CD © O CD 



00 



CD 
© 
t> 



CD © 

CO © 

© m 
m 



o ■<* 
o m 
o m 

•^ CM 
m co 



77 77 77 77 77 77 



co co m 

rt< o m 

00 ^ o 

t> "tf CO 

rH 00 Hh 



I I 
I I 
I I 



j-i-i £JX l*/**1 J*Q f/^ £/X 
77 77 77 77 77 77 



co 
co 

CM 

o 
o 
© 



Sfr 



CM 



I 



H 


X 


CM 


CD 


CO 


c^ 


CM 


m 


o 


i> 


i-H 


CO 


^H 


o 


CM 


oo 


"^ 


1— 1 


■* 


CD 


CO 


© 


r-H 


o 


rH 


^ 


i— 1 


CO 




m 




m 


€# 


m 


1 


<V3- 



CD 

m 



© 

CM 



00 
00 
00 



<fr 



CN 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


rH 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


rH 


LO 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CD 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


O 1 


00 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


m 


o m i 


o 


CD 


co m 


o 


CM 


in 


o 


o m 




^ 




LO 


o 


CO 


o 




o 


Tf 


Tf 


t> 


M 




rH 


rH 


CO 






rH 






o 




LO 




t> 


CD 


LO 


<D 






















CO 








© 


CD 



CM 



cr\ rf\ rr\ cr\ cf~\ c/x rf\ rr\ rr\ cr\ m rf\ rr\ rr\ z£x. rr\ r/*i 

77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 



co 



<V9- <&■ 



cooooooooooo 


o o o o o 


CO 


o 


CDOOOOOOOOOO 


o o o o o 


CD 


00 


■h/oooooooooo 


o o o o o 


■<* 


o 


ooomooooooo 


1 o o o o o 


CM 


© 


cooocMomoomo© 


i o o o m m 


00 


H 


■>oocMooi>Lnco m 


O CD m rH 


CM 


CO 


H O CO rH CO CM 


m Tf 


■* 


CM 


Tf C~- 


00 


H 


^ 


CM 




■* 




ff\ rr\ /a. rf~\ r.r\ cr\ cr\ e./\ m exx. rr\ cr\ crs <*r\ cr\ <T\ ct\ 

77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 


m- 


<&■ 



iO 


c 


O 


O 


c 


m 


© 


o 


O 


O 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


r-^ 


o 


c 


o 


c 


r-H 


o 


o 


o 


c 


O 


O 


m 


CO 


o 


c 


o 


H 


© 


PQ 


m 


o 


o 


t> 


X 




:~. 


CM 


CM 


CD 



Cf\ fj\ ff\ £T\ £T\ 

77 77 77 77 77 



h O o o o 


r-t 


© o o o o 


© 


00 l> o o o 


in 


co co o o o 


i> 


H o o o o 


r-H 


■* CD O O O 


O 


oofflom* 


-tf 


oo m co co 


r-H 



f/-\ tC\ ££i- £-d- £JX 
77 77 77 77 77 



<=* 



CM 



&■ 

















^ • 




























T3 +-> J 








CO 




















•H Oh 








Q 

















rH 




<; cd «h 








^ 


+-> 














CD 




r-> O O 









t=> 


03 














3 




CD CD 


CO 






Ph 


PS 














O 




CD -P !h CD 


•H 












Tj 








w 


■H 

CO 
CO 




-P 03 CD H 
+J -P -P 03 
■H CO 03 CO 


CJ 
X 

w 






W 
CD 


U X 

03 03 
H 




+-> 








Q 


•H 




S j== 








< 


>H 




a 








iz; 


s 




S3 <& 


-p 






-J 


-p 







Cfi 






O 


s 




O 03 CO 


3 






i— i 


CO CJ 3 




CJ 


Sh 






Ph 


o 


>> 


OX3 03 CO 









< 


3 3 .p 






0) 








o 


-p 


Eh T3 


S 






> 


O T3 S 3 




w 


-p £1 






H 


CD 


rH 


rH X! 3 


a 






< 


■H -P Q) 




■p 


CJ o 






h4 


>> CO 


CD 


O rH CJ 3 


•H 








> PS rH g 




c 


■H 03 -P 






OQ 


^2 -H 


a 


O CD 3 Ph 


3 






S 


03 +j 




CD 


rH (DO 






< 


CJ 





si si co 


cr 






o 


rH O a Jh 




£ 


-P Eh -H Jh 






J 


T3 X 


rH 


CJ -P *— ' -P 


w 






PS 


a -p oi 




w 


CO X Sh 03 


U 




i— i 


CD W 


Ph 


CO O CO 








Ph 


Q a 




w 


•H (JH4J CD 


a 




< 


•H 




CO 3 


T3 








&D 0JD b£ CD 




Q; 


Q (H 03 CO >h 


CD 




> 


SH rH 


T3 


«H CO CD S-h 


3 >> 






!z; 


3 3 3 q 




en 


Oh-H 


>< 




< 


•H CD 


3 


O -P CO Eh 


03 -P 


CO 




H 


•H -H -H O 




w 


T3 >>'HO CO 








+-> rH 


03 


a -H 


•H 


H 




M 


-P +J -P -H gj 




<c 


-P O 3 


CO 




Q 


rH -H 




CO -H ^ 3 


>> rH 


a 




< 


H j^ 






£ 3 -H rH O 


3 




Jz; 


CD 03 


CO 3 


-P CD & 03 


^H O 


h-H 




Eh 


O -H 


CO 


X 


CO 3 3 O -H 







<3 


CJ ?-t 


3 


a cj u si 


si 


H 






s s s a pt. 




CJ 


Jh O 3 rS > 


•H 






H 


CO O -H 


•H CD CD rH 


3 +J 


C_> 




W 




tH 


(UUS-H 0) 


> 




w 


CO 


+-> +j CO -P 


CD Pi -P 


•H 3 


W 




ca 


3 3 3 O o 


^ 




+J 3 3 Sh 


CD 




^ 


-P T3 


3 3 rH 03 


CJ 3 rH 


X! <C 


PS 






&&&+-> p 


Ph 


>> 


03 1 11 O Oft 


r< 




P, 3 


CD CD CD -P 


OH HO) 









o 


O O 




■P 


& O O -H 


Ch 




M 


•H 03 


SEft'H 


PS 03 X 


03 bfl 


a 




H 


Eh Eh Eh b£ {jfl 


W 


c 


CO 3 +- 1 73 






W 


CD 


CO 3 3 


CJ CD -P 


S 3 


w 






S 3 


1-4 


3 


r< CU 03 3 03 0) 


CO 




u 


O CD 


CO rH SH 03 


rH O CJ O 


•H 


H 




Q 


^ H in -H >r) 


CQ 
< 


o 


0) -P r< O -P 


0) 




w 


CD rH 


CD CD O CO 


03 hJ -H ^^ 


- CO 


<J 




W 


03 03 03 ?H ^ 


u 


> 03 3 -H 3 03 


-p 




tf 


Pi o 


CO > 


CJ ^ > 


H 3 


s 




s 


rH H rH 03 03 


J 




•H £ CO -P "D E 


03 






•H 


(11 O CD 


O 3 Jh CO 


03 O 


h-H 


X 


3 cj 3 x x; 


hH 


-o 


PS -H 3 3 W -H 


s 


J 


Q 


T3 Si 


< O O 3 


J CO O CD 


S M 


H 


<D 


> 


b£ W) CO co 


< 
> 


a 


-P M rH -P 


■H 


<U 


w 


CD CD CO 


•H 03 


CO -^ -H CO -H 


-P -H 


CO 


H 




a 


a 


XI CO HH (11 


-P 


cS 


Eh 


-P > CD 


rH rH -P 


>> -H -P ^ 


CO 3 rH 


H 




W 


PS CO PS Q 


<; 




O Q) X3 03 CD 


CO 


<d 


03 CO 


03 03 CJ r3 


03 rH Jh o3 CJ 


<C 




>h 


Eh 


3 3 




0) 


■h s-i -p ft -h ^ J CD 


-H 


s 


S rH 3 


CO -H ^i CD -P 


& O 03 -H -P 


rH > 


J 


Eh 


fe 


T3 T3 T3 3 3 


-p 


£ CD rH CJ CD <J U 




M 


•H O 


<D CJ CD +-> rH 


SZ O rH Jh H 


S O 


< 


fe 


t> 


QJ 


03 


CO X> o3 U CD "O E- 


h CD 


Eh 


Eh 


•P -P CJ 


3 CD 3 O 03 


M£^ CJ ,Q S 


■P U T3 


cS 


1=) 


O 


+j -i_> +j > ►> 


s 


+J 


ci|3cD-HCi|B O > 


W 


CO 


CO O H 


•H a CD rH CD 


■rt O ■'-I <X> Zi Q) 


3 03 3 


o 


s 


O O O 


CO 


m ta W <C »73 is H O 


^ 


W 


WSrJrHCOOftMWKI JtfftCJ 


Hh< 


Eh 


u 


<d 


> > > PS PS 


Eh 



22 





CM 




<tf 




o> 


CD 


o 


l> 


CD 


05 


- 


i— I 


LO 


1 


t> 


>H 


CM 


ft, 


- 



CM 



#3- 





O 




l> 




CO 


lO 


CO 


t> 


l> 


05 


- 


1— 1 


o 


1 


co 


!x 


CM 


Ph 


- 



CM 



W- 



CO 




£ 




-p 


o 


3 


CO 







s 


o 




C5 


CO 


CM 


H 


»« 


^ 


LO 


•<* 


^ 




C5 


00 


o 


o 


r-i 


C5 





&■ 



o 


o 


o 


o 


<tf 


o 


CM 


o 


O 


m 


-# 


CO 


'tf 


LO 


H 


LO 


O 


o 


rH 


CO 




CM 


<=/3-c/3- 



o o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

CO i-H 



<s> cm 

CD O 

05 CM 
CM 
CM 

^#3- 



O 
O 

CM 
CM 

CO 
C5 
CO 

O 

CM 



o 
o 

o 
o 

CM 



CO 
CM 



o o 

10 lO 



C5 r-i 
CM CM 



CO o 

O 05 



O CM 

CO CM 



CM CO 
O C5 



-* C5 

CO r-l 



o 
o 



LO 



<&<& &- 



O 
O 



CO 

LO 



¥><& &■ 



O 

o 



<HH 

LO 



&■&■ #3- 



o o 

C5 LO 

o co 

r-l CM 
CO CM 

t> co 

I— I LO 
LO t> 



#3- #3- <fr 



O O 

■tf CO 

LO CO 

CD rH 

CD r-i 

CO t> 

r-i CD 

LO O 



^3-^3- #3- 



O O 

O CM 

O t> 

LO I> 

t> t^ 

CM O 

o> t> 



۩-W- #3- 



-P 
















rH 
















0) 
















a 

































U 
















Ch 4-> 
















nJ 
















r-t +-> 
















«J CO 
















c w 





























Q 




CO rH 












W 


>> 


P. Rj 












hH 


P 


01 QJ 












> 


5h 


Cm OS 










w 

Eh 





ft 


cp «H 










<U 




o 


o 






0) 
-p 




tf 


CO 

H 


Sh 
Cm -p 


s a 






KJ 




X 


X 


«j 


o o 




H 


OS 




< 


<J 


rH -P 


•H -H 




H 




rH 


Eh 


Eh 


<tf CO 


+-> p 




< 


rH 


CJ 






3 w 


rt rt 


-h 


OS 


O 


rH 


J 


J 


o 


3 3 


< 




o 





<H 


«9! 


CO t-* 


rH rH 


S 


X 

< 


.3 

u 


3 



g 


CD 


0) CD 


> > 


H 


H 


CO O 


H 


Eh 


0. OS 



t> 

■* 

CI 

o 

CD 
LO 
CM 
CM 



O 
t> 

CO 

CO 

o 

o 

co 

CM 
CM 



O 
CM 

t> 
CM 
LO 

CO 
CD 
05 



< 

c3 

Eh 





r-i 


p 


a 


a 


p> 


CU 


o 


O Eh 


Ph 







<P 


Cm 


o 



a 

o 

•H 

"k$ +-> 
p rt 
O 3 

H rH 

nj 

> 



rH ^ LO 
rH rH t> 



O O O 

O O O 

t^ LO CO 

CO rH CO 

CM CD CD 

CM Ci CO 

LO CM CM 

CM CO C^ 

#3-#3-#3- 



CD rH CO 
I> t> 05 

CO 



s£ 












o 












o 












r-i 
















■<$ 


CM 


CM 


■* 






Oi 


LO 


■* 


^t 1 






LO 


co 


Ol 


LO 






<y> 


CO 


O 


CO 




CD 


^ 


co 


CD 


t> 


o 


l> 


■~ 


- 


- 




o 


05 


o 


^ 


LO 


o 


LO 


r-i 


LO 


t> 


o 


LO 


- 




t^ 


^* 


CM 


CM 


CO 




- 


- 


- 




LO 




00 


CD 


CM 




lO 




r-i 




r-t 




o 




^3- 


^3- 


<& 


&■ 


CO 












CM 













o 
o 

co 





r-i 


-p 


a 


c 


+j 


CD 


o 


o 


H 


u 







4h 


Ph 


O 



r-H 'HH LO 

HH t^ 



o 
o 







O O O 


o 






o o o 


o 




LO 




rH LO LO 


r-t 




o 


3 


- - ~ 


•N 




05 


O 


LO ^ rH 


r-i 




r-i 


rH -H 


TF CM LO 


CM 




a +-> 


rH O rH 


O 




■p a 


„ „ 


•- 




O 3 


TjH rH CD 


CM 


X3 


Eh rH 


CM CO CD 


CM 





a 


r-i 


CM 


CO 




> 


cfi-se-^3- 


<^- 


■H 



CO rH CO 

oo t> co 

rH CM 

CO 



00 

oo 



I— 1 


rH 


as 




a 


nl 


■H 




•H 


•H 


+-> 




O 


!h 


3 




Ph 


+-> 










Cfi 


TD 


^ 


S 


3 


•H 


< 


s 


X! 


CO 


s 


o 


3 





u 


HH 


« 


H 



LO LO 

CD rH 



CO CO 
O 05 



O 



co 

CO 



LO 


T* 


■HH 


t> 


l> 


~ 


•> 




05 


00 


^ 


o 


i— 1 


LO 


C5 


00 




o 


<-i 


CM 




CQ 



O o3 



CO 
T3 
3 

3 



J2 



> 
< 



3 
3 


s 

co 
CO 

o 
U 
O 



CO 

-p 
a 

•H 


o 





+- 1 
CO 

w 



T5 

CO 
•H 
CTJ 

Pd 


CQ 



3 
3 
O 
E 
< 







O 
05 

CO 
05 

o 

CM 

05 



CM 



<V3- #3- <V3- #3- 



>h 
<C 

OS 

w 
> 
o 



23 



Fire Department 



The Fire Department is established and maintained by the municipality to pro- 
vide protection to the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, 
explosion or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of 
this work, the firefighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the 
highest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
concerning his work if he is to perform his duties efficiently and with minimum risk 
to himself and to his fellow firefighters. He should have detailed knowledge of the 
dangers arising from heat, smoke, explosion, etc., caused by fire; of the hazards 
presented by new industries, processes and materials developed by science; of the 
construction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or stored 
in them; and of the dangers involved in the use of water at high pressures. 

Objectives of fire protection are to prevent fire from starting, to prevent 
loss of life and property in case fire starts, to confine fire to the place of 
origin and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and dra- 
matic action, has far greater appeal for people than have fire prevention measures 
which involve restrictions, prohibitions and administrative "interference" with what 
are termed "individual rights". 

The Fire Department installs, repairs and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
comprising some three million feet of wiring, both aerial and underground, and 
associated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system. The 
Department operates from three stations — the Public Safety Center and the Ballard- 
vale and West Substations. Its fifty-seven men use seven pieces of firefighting 
equipment . 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals and inns, as required by 
State statutes, were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper 
authorities. Public and Private school fire drills and inspections required by law 
were conducted. Mercantile, industrial, church, garage and service stations were 
inspected and reports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to owners/occu- 
pants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In-service inspections were 
conducted from all stations using radio-controlled fire trucks and a full complement 
of firefighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid storage «nd all such 
associated equipment were issued. Blasting permits and Model Rocketry permits were 
also issued in accordance with State Laws. 

As in past years, the major causes of fire were carelessness, the misuse of 
smoking materials, children and matches and faulty electrical appliances and wiring. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Service Calls 

Fires 

False Alarms 

Mutual Aid Calls 



1974-1975 
(18-Month Period) 


(18- 


1973-1974 
-Month Period) 


1972 


3,130 




2 


942 




1,638 


916 






745 




381 


101 






79 




37 


27 






8 




11 



24 






1974-1975 1973-1974 

(18-Month Period) (18-Month Period) 1972 

Approx. Value of Bldgs. 

Where Fire Occurred $104,030,830.47 $ 46,280,120.00 $ 82,432,500.00 

Approx. Loss from Fires $ 423,347.43 $ 285,268.76 $ 103,868.92 

Ambulance Calls 1,003 846 568 

Non-Residents billed 

for Ambulance Service 293 284 278 

Fuel Oil Heat Install- 
ation Permits issued 137 121 100 

Explosive Use Permits 12 18 15 

Building Inspections 1,628 1,418 934 

Fire Drills Conducted 189 186 124 

Fatalities From Fire 3 

Flammable Liquid and Ex- 
plosive Permits Issued 19 48 21 

Welding/Cutting Permits 6 20 9 

Fireworks Permits 12 

Rocketry Permits 21 31 52 

Abandon Underground Tank 

Permits Issued 3 3 2 



Dog Officer 



Lost Dogs 123 

Dogs Found 73 

Dogs Ordered Restrained 71 

Dog Complaints „ 708 

Dogs Sold 66 

Money Turned in to Town Treasurer $198.00 

Owners Contacted for Having Unlicensed Dogs 914 

Cats Turned in to Pound 166 

Various Dead Animals Picked Up 388 

Impounded Dogs (Unlicensed) 251 

Impounded Dogs (Licensed) 8 



25 



Police Department 



During the last six months of 1974 (July 1 - December 31) one officer retired 
and one civilian dispatcher was hired so that on 31 December 1974 the Police Depart- 
ment consisted of a Chief, 3 Lieutenants, 5 Sergeants and 31 Patrolmen. There were 
also 14 Crossing Guards, female, 2 civilian dispatchers and 1 maintenance man. 

The following is a resume of activities for the Police Department for the per- 
iod July 1 through 31 December 1974. In parenthesis ( ) is shown the figures for 
the first six months of 1974. There were 2,403 (3,682) complaints received by the 
Police Department. These are calls for which some action is taken by the Police 
Department other than the calls received for accidents, housebreaks, larcenies, in- 
formation, etc.. Between 15,000 and 20,000 calls are received yearly by the Police 
Department. In the above period there were 131 (131) reported housebreaks and 26 
(5) attempted breaks. Also during that period 86 (55) automobiles were stolen, and 
112 (85) bicycles were stolen. There were 223 (158) cases of vandalism reported 
and also 312 (207) larceny reports were received. As far as motor vehicle acci- 
dents are concerned, there were 347 (356) reportable accidents with 1 (1) fatality. 
The police cars traveled 171,197 (171,886) miles using 23,214 (22,926) gallons of 
gasoline. During the last six months of 1974 there were 335 (294) cases prosecuted 
in the courts, 189 (140) of which were motor vehicle violations. Included in the 
motor vehicle violations were 32 (42) complaints of driving while intoxicated and 
17 (26) drug related cases were prosecuted. There were 51 (39) juvenile offenders 
involved in court appearances — 16 for B & E, 3 for larceny, 6 using motor vehicles 
without authority, 2 narcotic cases, 3 liquor violations, 2 Assault & Battery, and 
5 other violations and also 14 motor vehicle violations. 

In 1975 there were significant changes made in the personnel of the Police 
Department. Two officers resigned and two more civilian dispatchers, one female, 
were hired. There are three male dispatchers and one female dispatcher working on 
a 24-hour schedule. With the addition of a safety car which was acquired through 
Federal funding at no expense to the Town, one officer was assigned as a school and 
traffic safety officer. His job is to coordinate a school safety program and also 
a traffic safety program. This officer has received special training in these 
fields. Also three new permanent officers were appointed to replace those who left 
the force, and one part-time civilian clerk, female, was hired. Thus, at the end of 
1975 the Police Department consisted of a Chief, 3 Lieutenants, 5 Sergeants, and 32 
Patrolmen. This includes one Sergeant and two Patrolmen assigned to the Detective 
Division. Also one more Crossing Guard was hired, so that there are 15 female Cross- 
ing Guards assigned to the various posts. Two reserve officers, 4 dispatchers, 2 
clerks, 1 full-time and 1 part-time maintenance man and 1 part-time mechanic com- 
pletes the roster. 

In 1975 there were 12 officers from the department attending college, and 3 
officers received Bachelor Degrees. Not only does this help the Town, but it also 
helps the officers through the incentive pay plan which the Town has. Also 3 of 
the 4 civilian dispatchers are attending college and have taken the police entrance 
examination in 1975, and the fourth dispatcher is already a reserve officer in 
Andover. The following seminars were attended by officers during 1975: Rape 
Squad (5), F.B.I. Firearms Instructor School (3), Skid Control (2), Narcotic En- 
forcement (1), Accident Investigation (2), Search and Seizure (1), Bomb Scare (1), 
Crime Scene (1), Breathalyzer School (1), White Collar Crimes (2), Police Academy 
(1) . There is a definite interest in the continuing education of the police 
officers both by the officers themselves and Town Officials who allow the attend- 
ance of the officers at the various schools, conferences and seminars. 

As far as statistics are concerned, 1975 varied very little in most categories 
with the exception of housebreaks. There were 331 reported housebreaks in 1975 as 
against 262 in 1974. This type of crime which is plaguing the whole area is very 
hard to solve with only 25 arrests being made, 16 of which were juveniles. More 

26 



and more residents are installing burglar alarms of some sort which is one of the 
best methods of combatting the housebreaker. Also an additional 231 pistol permits 
were issued by the Police Department along with 855 additional Firearm Identifi- 
cation Cards no doubt brought about by the new Gun Law. Another problem which has 
reached the serious stage is the theft of automobiles. In 1975 there were 140 cars 
stolen in Andover , and by a strange coincidence 144 cars were recovered showing 
that the Town is also a dumping ground for cars stolen elsewhere and abandoned here. 
The sad part of the whole thing is that over 50% of the cars recovered have been 
burned out. Bicycle thieves were active again in 1975 as 175 were stolen, which is 
22 less than in 1974. Again the Police Department requests compliance with the law 
accepted by the Town which calls for bicycle registration. Also the general public 
could assist the police in combatting this type of theft by taking greater pains to 
see that the bicycles are locked up, both on the street and at home. Another situ- 
ation which concerns the Police Department is the increase of vandalism in the Town, 
in 1975 there were 570 cases of vandalism reported as against 381 in 1974. Inci- 
dents vary from blowing up mailboxes to damaging expensive construction equipment, 
and the damage runs into thousands of dollars. 

One crime category which showed a marked decrease over 1974 was larceny. In 
1975 there were 384 reported larcenies as against 519 cases reported in 1974. 
During the year 1975 there were 754 motor vehicle accidents reported in Andover, 
including 5 fatalities. This represents an increase of 51 accidents and 3 fatali- 
ties over 1974. 

In 1975 there were 663 cases prosecuted in court. Of the cases prosecuted, 
494 were for motor vehicle violations, including 231 for speeding and 68 for oper- 
ating under the influence of liquor. Of the more serious cases prosecuted, there 
were 11 drug cases, 25 larceny cases, 10 assault and battery cases, 25 breaking and 
entering cases, 1 case of arson, and 3 armed robbery cases. In 1975 there were 2 
cases of murder investigated by the Police Department, one of which was a murder- 
suicide case and the other involved a shooting on Route 93. The latter case is 
still unsolved. Also in 1975 a new method of handling parking violations was intro- 
duced and 5,558 parking violation tickets were issued. All fines for such viola- 
tions are returned to the Town. 

During the year, the police cars traveled 333,257 miles, using 45,108 gallons 
of gasoline. The cost of the gasoline amounted to more than $15,000.00 which is 
more than half the motor vehicle budget. The maintenance of 10 vehicles is in- 
cluded in this budget item. 

The following chart shows activities for the past five years: 

1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 

Complaints 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny 

Stolen Cars 

Stolen Bicycles 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Motor Vehicle Deaths 

Cruiser Mileage 



5,658 


6 


,443 


7 


,210 


6 


,085 


4 


,927 


183 




232 




161 




262 




331 


434 




343 




429 




519 




384 


72 




58 




88 




141 




140 


132 




97 




121 




197 




175 


711 




766 




829 




703 




754 


3 




7 




5 




2 




5 


333,895 


339 


,846 


344 


,190 


343 


,083 


333 


,257 



27 



Civil Defense 



The present Director of Civil Defense was appointed in January, 1975. The 
primary function of Andover Civil Defense is the planning and preparation to cope 
with any man-made or natural disaster. To accomplish this objective the help of 
civic-minded volunteers must be depended upon. 

These volunteers are divided into two groups--a radio communications group 
consisting of thirteen members and an Auxiliary Police group consisting of twenty 
members . 

The radio group meets weekly for test of equipment and training. In the case 
of a disaster this group would be able to assure communication at all essential 
points and all departments would be on the same radio frequency. 

The Auxiliary Police meet once a month for regular meetings, and training some- 
times requires additional meetings. These men come under the control of the Police 
Chief and are used to supplement the regular officers when needed. In the past 
year they have worked (unpaid) on Memorial Day, July 4, Halloween night, Christmas 
Parade and assisted in a special task for the Police Department. 

The Director's primary function is to remain as liaison between the Town 
Government and the public, and to be in contact with all State and Federal Programs 
regarding Civil Defense. To accomplish this, the Director attended two 3-day 
seminars, one held in Woburn on April 29, 30 and May 1 and one held in Somerville 
on June 3, 4 and 5. In addition to these meetings, the Director attended two 
meetings at Civil Defense Headquarters in Tewksbury on August 12 and October 21, 
1975. The Director also attends the weekly and monthly meetings to keep all mem- 
bers adequately informed of any new changes regarding our objective. 

The Director also visits and inspects the shelters and shelter supplies and 
keeps a close inventory on the Civil Defense Portable Hospital. 



Game Warden 

This department spent many hours patroling the Town of Andover in the past 
year. Many problems arose from the use of recreation vehicles by private citizens. 
In some cases citations were issued and forwarded to the Registry of Motor Vehicles, 
and many were given verbal warnings. However, the general trend of thought is that 
there should be some place within Town boundaries for these people to use their 
recreation vehicles and this department agrees. 

Posting of areas before the hunting season began was carried out with the co- 
operation of the Police Department out of whose budget the signs were printed. In 
many cases they were placed on plywood and screened over so they could not be 
destroyed . 

All wardens attend a seminar at Northern - Essex Community College in Haverhill 
to get all details on the firearms laws. 

All wardens are now Certified Department of Natural Resources Hunter-Safety 
Instructors. There were many hours spent in classroom teaching this past year, 
and just under 100 students were graduated and certified. Each course runs seven 
weeks, one night a week. 

This department also assisted in search and rescue work on different occas- 
ions, both within and outside the Town. 

28 



In many cases stolen or burned out motor vehicles were found, especially in 
remote wooded areas where the average person doesn't travel. 

Communication is the wardens' biggest problem and perhaps some of the equip- 
ment being phased out by the Police Department could be turned over to the Game 
Warden for their use. The battery-operated units now in use are very inefficient 
and short-lived. 

All wardens combined put in a total of approximately 4,000 hours of time on 
this job. This included all activities, such as checking fishermen, hunters' com- 
plaints, recreation vehicle complaints and assisting the Animal Control Officer in 
the capture and relocating of certain wild animals. 

Once again the Game Wardens wish to express their appreciation for the excel- 
lent cooperation shown by Chief David L. Nicoll and his department. It would be 
exceedingly difficult to do this job without his help. 

Suggestion for the future: an area set aside for the use of recreation vehic- 
les and updated communications equipment. 



Inspection Services 



In September of 1974, the Department of Inspection Services was created and 
the General Construction Inspector appointed. The purpose of this department is to 
assure the compliance of private contractors with the Planning Board's Rules and 
Regulations, Specifications of the Department of Public Works and all other Town 
Regulations . 

Under the direction of the Town Manager, the General Construction Inspector 
conducts daily inspections of all active subdivisions in the Town. These in- 
spections include the construction of roads within the subdivision and all utilities, 
such as sanitary sewers, water mains, storm drainage, gas, electric and telephone. 
A testing program is also carried out during construction to insure specifications 
are met. 

At present there are approximately 30 subdivisions in various stages of con- 
struction. The stages of construction range from plans on paper to completed sub- 
divisions with streets submitted for acceptance by the Town. 

The General Construction Inspector periodically inspects street openings and 
maintains a cross-section file on all street openings and contractors. A file on 
insurance coverage of all road contractors working within the Town is also main- 
tained . 

The General Construction Inspector compiles reports for the Planning Board on 
specific items requested and submits reports to the Board for information. He also 
checks the subdivisions for conformity with the approved plans of the Andover Con- 
servation Commission. 

In addition, the General Construction Inspector acts as the Resident Inspector 
on projects under contract for the installation of sanitary sewers, water mains, 
storm drainage, sidewalks and similar projects. 



Electrical Inspection 



The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding 

of persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. 

Enforcement of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the responsibility of the 

29 



Electrical Inspector's Department. The Electrical Inspector also has the responsi- 
bility of enforcing fire alarm regulations for new homes set by the Fire Department. 
Other duties include receiving, scheduling and granting of permits and inspections 
from his office on a daily basis; inspection of all residential, commercial and in- 
dustrial jobs; certificate of inspection of schools, public buildings, day care 
centers and nursing homes, formerly covered by the State; also, approval of elec- 
trical plans for new buildings; inspection of all buildings for certificate of 
occupancy; assisting the Fire Department in inspection of fires due to faulty elec- 
trical devices or equipment and seeing that permits are issued for repairs due to 
fire damage; assisting the Building Department on junk car inspection; attendance 
at school and classes on revisions to the electrical code and power distribution 
systems to keep up with standards. 

Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the cooperation of Massa- 
chusetts Electric Company and corrected without incident. Due to the increased 
work load upon this department relative to inspections, etc., the position of 
Electrical Inspector has been made a full-time position. 

Also, the number of inspections per permit has increased, particularly in the 
industrial-commercial areas; therefore, the department has completely revised and 
increased the permit fees dealing with these areas. It is the intent of the Elec- 
trical Inspection Department to assure the citizens and businesses of Andover a 
safe electrical installation to the fullest ability of the department. 

Following is a tabulation of the Electrical Permits issued for the 18-month 
period from July, 1974 through December, 1975: 

Permits Fees 

Issued Type Collected 

173 New Dwellings $2,890.00 

6 Other Structures 1,091.00 

180 Additions and Alterations 1,120.00 
468 Others (Sign, Swimming Pools, 

Service Changes, etc.) 3,876.00 

827 TOTAL $8,977.00 



Building Inspection 



The purpose and scope of the Massachusetts State Building Code is to provide 
for safety, health, and public welfare through structural strength and stability, 
adequate egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property 
from fire hazards incident to design. 

Enforcement of the Massachusetts State Building Code is the responsibility of 
the Department of Building Inspection. The Inspector of Buildings also is the en- 
forcing officer for the Town Zoning Bylaws with his rulings subject to the Zoning 
Board of Appeals. 

All Board of Appeals applications are reviewed and processed through this 
office and, in addition, copies of its definitive action on all petitions are kept 
for the convenience of the general public. 

Electrical permits are processed through this department with the approval of 
the Electrical Inspector. Related records, fees, and reports are also maintained 
by this office for all three departments. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, as required in the Bylaws, all es- 
tablishments for license issuance were investigated, and inspection reports were 
filed with the Town Manager. Also, as required by the Massachusetts State Building 
Code, many other occupancies requiring licenses were investigated and certificates 

30 



have been issued as defined in Table 1-1, Massachusetts State Building Code. 

The Inspector of Buildings and his Assistant attended many courses of advanced 
education sponsored by the Commonwealth and Building Inspectors' organizations. 
Attendance at these Commonwealth courses was mandatory in order to attain certifi- 
cation when the Massachusetts State Building Code became effective on January 1, 
1975. 

Numerous building and zoning violations were investigated and corrected with- 
out incident. 

Considerable time must be spent during the ensuring year in preparation for 
the many changes in design criteria and increased work load by this office relative 
to schools, special halls, nursing homes and many more which were formerly under 
the jurisdiction of the area State Inspector. This new work load creates the need 
for additional and numerous reports, plus many more hours of important clerical 
work which is closely associated with an inspection department which continues con- 
stantly to serve the Town to its greatest ability. 

Considerable effort was spent this year on updating and approving Building and 

Electrical permit fee schedules. This, along with Table 1-1 of the Massachusetts 

State Building Code, should enable this department to continue on an expense-cost 
basis . 



Following is a tabulation of the Building Permits issued for the years 1970 
through 1975: 



1970 

85 

6 

224 

97 

"4T2" 
3 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Soil Removals 



ESTIMATED VALUATION 

$ 2,370,500.00 
949,500.00 
947,575.00 

200,175.00 

$ 4,467,750.00 



PERMIT FEES 



$13,205.00 

39.00 

$13,244.00 



1971 



114 
45 

229 
76 

"4"6T 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 



$ 2,882,194.00 
5,513,249.00 
4,150,940.00 

166,370.00 
$12,712,753.00 



$23,253.00 



1972 



205 

62 

240 

102 

"6779 
4 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Soil Removals 



$ 5,612,000.00 

743,420.00 

1,378,722.00 

166,290.00 
$ 7,900,432.00 



$22,236.00 

50.00 

$22,286.00 



31 



1973 - 6/30/74 



243 

89 

417 

211 

"96U 
11 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Soil Removals 



ESTIMATED VALUATION 

$ 7,495,280.00 
5,599,303.00 
2,602,480.00 

304,591. 00 
$16,001,654.00 



PERMIT FEES 



$46,437.00 

72.00 

$46,509.00 



7/74 - 12/75 



168 

97 

478 

194 

"937 
45 

1 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 6,041,500.00 
9,282,296.00 
2,707,277.00 

309,630.00 
$18,340,703.00 



$54,143.00 

1,425.00 

3.00 

$55,571.00 



Planning Board 



The Planning Board's functions can be divided into two related aspects. The 
first is the long-range planning of the Town's orderly growth, seeking to place the 
Town's limited resources of land, money and effort to the best and highest use. 
When operating in this capacity, the bulk of the work consists of studies of facts 
and trends in municipal planning and law, and in the collection of data on existing 
uses and popular feeling on and in the Town. The results are published in advisory 
reports to the Town. In preparation of the reports, it tries to be both idealistic 
and pragmatic, developing a plan that is workable. It should be emphasized that 
the plans are advisory and that they cannot take effect without broad Town support 
as expressed by vote at Town Meeting and without the support of the Selectmen and 
the various special interest groups in the Town. 

In accomplishing this task, the Planning Board is assisted by its consultant, 
Philip Herr and Associates, who provides much of the input for current planning 
philosophy and law as well as ideas which have borne fruit in other communities. 
In addition the consultant spends much of his time in data gathering for projecting 
many of the studies. The Board finds his services indispensable and it is no acci- 
dent that approximately one-half of the budget covers his services. The other way 
the Board's goal is accomplished is by working and meeting with other town boards, 
Selectmen, Industrial Development Commission and the Conservation Commission, and 
special interest study groups such as the Chamber of Commerce, Sacred Heart Study 
Committee, Historical District Study Committee, Post Office Site Committee, Open 
Space/Recreation Study Committee and the Traffic Committee. 

During the last year the Planning Board has met several times with each of the 
above mentioned groups or has taken a leadership position in several of the studies. 
It has also made the services of the Planning Consultant available to the boards or 
study groups for special projects. 

The results of the year's efforts can be seen in the Central Business District 
Survey and Study, which definitively outlines the Town's desires and opinions re- 
garding downtown Andover and will serve as a guide for future plans. The Sacred 
Heart School Study and the Historical District Study contained Planning Board input 
and an Open Space/Recreation report, prepared by a subcommittee of the Planning 
Board, will be released soon. 



32 



The Board's other main function, which takes up much of its formal meeting 
time and many spare hours, is the problem of subdivision and development control. 
During the last year the Board has reviewed twelve (12) plans, containing one 
hundred and thirteen (113) lots, approving forty-eight (48) lots and disapproving 
twenty-six (26); one plan with thirty-nine (39) lots is pending. The Board held a 
hearing and rescinded one subdivision plan with seven (7) lots. 

During the year a total of sixty-one (61) lots, having frontage on existing 
streets and of proper size, were certified as not requiring Planning Board approval. 
In addition, the Board has worked closely with Arkwright-Boston Corporation and 
Hewlett Packard in the layout of roads and facilities in their industrial develop- 
ment off River Road and Route 93 and, during this process, obtained an access right- 
of-way from River Road to the Town's Merrimack River recreation property. 

Probably the most notable improvement in subdivision control has been in the 
area of gaining completion of subdivisions in a proper, timely manner. In December, 
1974, new regulations were placed in effect and a more vigorous enforcement of the 
requirements started. This has resulted not only in proper completion of the sub- 
divisions, but also completion on time by the large majority of developers. Two of 
three problem areas of long standing were resolved and the third area is well on 
the way to early summer completion. The Board has taken steps to insure that such 
problems will not recur by upgrading the bonding requirements which developers must 
meet . 

Finally, the Planning Board has attended Board of Appeals meetings regularly 
to express the Board's viewpoint on each of the petitions heard. Donald Mulvey 
continues to represent the Board on the Merrimack Valley Regional Planning Commis- 
sion. In the upcoming year, the Board expects to continue to seek resolution of 
some of the "Downtown" problems including the Post Office location and traffic con- 
trol and local transportation. The Board also plans to actively participate in the 
newly-established Growth Policy Committee. 

In December, 1975, the legislature completely revised the Zoning Enabling Act 
considerably broadening the scope of zoning and modifying procedures for zoning con- 
trol. These revisions will require many changes in the Town's Zoning Bylaw. 



Board of Appeals 



The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the Gen- 
eral Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapters 40A and 40B and the Town 
Bylaws. The Board meets on the first Thursday of every month in the second-floor 
hall of Memorial Hall Library. Three regular members and three associate members 
are appointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings held by 
the Board of Appeals are the result of applications in the following areas: 

(1) for a variance from the requirements of Bylaws; 

(2) for a special permit under the Bylaws; 

(3) by a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building 
Inspector or other administrative officer; or 

(4) for permission to construct Low or Moderate Income 
Housing within the Town of Andover. 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters and abutters to abutters 
are notified, as required by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chair- 
man in conformity with Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations which were updated in 
June 1974. Following the hearing-, the members of the Board view each propertyin 
question. Based on their view and the evidence presented at the hearing, a decision 

33 



is rendered, signed and filed in the office of the Town Clerk. Parties in interest 
are notified of the Board's decision. 

In the period from July 1, 1974 through December 31, 1975, the activities of 
the Board of Appeals were as follows: 18 regular meetings were held and 62 peti- 
tions were heard. of the 62 petitions heard: 

52 were granted 
8 were denied 
1 was withdrawn 
1 is pending 

$1,550 for hearing fees was collected and turned over to the Town Treasurer. 



Weights and Measures 



Yearly departmental duties consist of performing appropriate performance tests 
on all commercial weighing and measuring devices. These consist of gasoline pump 
meters, home heating oil truck meters, market scales, industrial scales, etc. 

All tests are conducted in accordance with prescribed National Bureau of Stan- 
dards procedure. Units performing within specified limits of permissable deviation 
or departure from true performance receive a Town accuracy of performance colored 
paper seal. Inaccurate devices are adjusted to perform as close to true performance 
as mechanical conditions permit. Units not susceptible to correction (wear, damage, 
etc.,) are marked CONDEMNED, illegal for use in trade. 

Delivery receipts of home heating oil, propane gas and cord wood are continu- 
ously inspected for accuracy and compliance. Municipal purchases and deliveries are 
periodically inspected, reweighed or remeasured . 

All prepackaged meats, poultry, edible fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and grain 
are reweighed or remeasured for declared content and proper labeling. All liquid 
container content markings such as food, drink, condiment and household products are 
also checked for accuracy. 

Other duties include: Enforcement of all market Unit Pricing regulations; 
testing of pharmacy prescription balances, volumetric graduates, apothecary, avoir- 
dupois and metric weights for accuracy; inspection of all clinical thermometers for 
required licensing and markings verifying accuracy; enforcement of all activities 
of hawkers and peddlers going from door to door on foot or from vehicles; testing of 
all vehicle scales and heavy-capacity scales employed in the process of commercially- 
manufactured goods, wares and merchandise; and investigation of all complaints, act- I 
ing as a prosecution witness when necessary. 

Today's weighing and measuring devices, by necessity, are sophisticated instru- 
ments capable of measurement accuracies unobtainable less than a decade ago. The 
spin-off from space age technology has proven to be dramatic. Innovations are being 
introduced into the marketplace at an accelerated rate. Time-honored pivots and 
bearings, as employed in common scale construction, are at this moment facing com- 
plete extinction. Systems employing movements of levers, gears for directional move- 
ment and circular or ribbon analog computation chart, combined with a reference inde: 
are destined for imminent obsolescence. 

Space-age technology enables the construction of today's scales to employ force 
transition principles embodying non-motional, or stationary, flexure plates, load 
cells and solid-state digital telemetry, providing instantaneous visible computa- 
tions combined with a printed receipt displaying net weight, price per pound and 
sales price. Unit automatically maintains a "no load" zero scale balance. Scales 
possess an accuracy within .005 of a pound, or all weighings are computed to the 
nearest penny regardless of price per pound being employed (scales being replaced 
compute to nearest nickel) . 

34 



The introduction of these new weighing devices is also responsible for an en- 
tirely new supermarket concept. The most revolutionary merchandising program ever 
to be designed is now an actual reality. Universal Product Coding (UPC) will force 
old merchandising methods to be discarded. The '"heart" of the system, the "scanner", 
eliminates all of the duties of the check-out clerk. All packages are electronically 
recorded and priced by the scanner action and recorded on a receipt tape requiring 
no human effort. The cash register contains no customary numerical monetary price 
keys. The check-out clerk assumes the position of bag-boy and packages the order as 
fast as the conveyor runs the items over the scanner. 

Inspection of the bottom of present food packages (side of cans) will reveal 

the secret of the UPC. system. A series of parallel black lines of varying widths, 
forming a square symbol with numerical numbers below can be found on every package. 
All markings are individual, there are no duplicates. 

The advocates of this system, NCR, Burroughs, IBM, etc., claim than an individ- 
ual's check-out time can be reduced substantially while eliminating one-half of the 
present existing check-out aisles. 

While the gasoline pump has remained virtually unchanged mechanically, with 
only minor external sheet metal changes, for a period of years, the motorist will, 
very shortly, be presented with major changes. Quantity and sales price will be 
digitally displayed. Tank overflow will become an experience of the past with the 
introduction of the mandatory vapor recovery system. Self-service units will accept 
paper money and deliver proper quantity of prepaid sum. 

This is truly a highly technical society and the Sealer is required to possess 
a thorough working knowledge of the individual weighing and measuring devices to per- 
mit him to be in a position to formulate intelligently appropriate performance tests 
to be assured that equity prevails in the marketplace. The Sealer of Weights and 
Measures has the responsibility of protecting both the buyer and the seller. 

The Department of Weights and Measures sealed 178 weighing or measuring devices, 
adjusted 16, attached NOT SEALED labels on 5 devices and CONDEMNED 5 units during 
the period from July 1, 1974 through December 31, 1975. 

Sealing fees during this period amounted to $321.40. 

A total of 26,722 items were inspected for proper labeling, weight, count and 
volume content. 16,869 items were found to be correct, while 3,099 items were found 
to be deficient in either weight or volume. 6,754 items were found to contain an 
amount in excess of declared quantity. 



Development and Industrial Commission 



The Andover Development and Industrial Commission's activities in the past 
eighteen months were concentrated on flood plain and industrial zoning considerations, 
a visitation program to meet with and discuss problems with Andover companies and 
serving as a conduit for information to companies investigating the possibilities of 
locating in Andover. 

Activities overall were curtailed due to the economic recession which severely 
hit this area. 

Taxes received by the Town from industrial and commercial companies continued 
to increase. Cressey-Dockham commenced full-scale operations from its new facility 
in Lowell Junction. Hewlett-Packard started construction of its Medical Products 
Division facility in West Andover.. This plant is expected to open in August of 1976 
and employ 700 to 800 persons initially. 

35 



Bikeways Committee 



The Andover Bikeways Committee was appointed on August 18, 1975 „ Members of 
the Bikeways Committee are Margaret Keck, Barbara Lybrand, Audrey Kenney, John McCoy 
Richard Chapell and Mark Klempa. 

Since that time, the Committee has met regularly at least once a month. Effort! 
have been focused on developing a proposed Town-wide bikeways system, emphasizing us« 
by the general public at a minimal cost to the Town. In this connection, the Bike- 
ways Committee has been cooperating with the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission in 
coordinating Andover ' s plans with State and regional plans . 



Housing Authority 



The year 1975 was a year of change for the Andover Housing Authority. Mr. 
Edward Manning, Executive Director for 25 years, retired and was replaced by Thomas 
P. Walsh. 

John B. White, Jr., was re-elected by the townspeople to serve another five- 
year term. 

The Authority's third Elderly Housing Project, consisting of 89 units for the 
elderly and seven units for handicapped persons, is nearing completion and will be 
occupied before April, 1976. The former Curran Estate located at 250 No. Main 
Street is the site of the ninety-six (96) new State-aided housing units. 

An application to the Department of Housing and Urban Development for 36 units 
of subsidized housing units was approved in November, 1975. A signed annual con- 
tribution contract and actual funding for the new Federally-aided Section 8 Program 
will be forthcoming in February, 1976. 

Veterans Project 200-1 

56 units located at Memorial Circle near Chestnut and Morton Streets. 

1975 was the 25th year of occupancy for this project. 

The average monthly rental is $110.00. 

Seven new families moved into the project this year and one family moved on- 
site. There are forty-one applicants on a waiting list. Family incomes are ex- 
amined once a year to determine the rental charge. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses: 

INCOME 

Rents and Interest $74,538.22 

State Aid 23,069.70 $97,607.92 

EXPENSES 

Administration $ 9,311,65 

Utilities 34,851.11 

Maintenance and Labor 13,833.42 

General Expense 5,716.73 

Reserve and Debt Service 25,757.70 $89,470.61 

Surplus 8,137.31 

Total Expense and Surplus $97,607.92 

36 



Elderly Housing Project 667-C 

This is a consolidated project consisting of 40 units located at Chestnut Court 
(project 667-1) and 40 units at Grandview Terrace (Project 667-2) . 

The income limits for admission to Elderly housing are: 

1 person $4,500.00 

2 persons $5,000.00 

Four new occupants moved into the project and four moved on-site. 

There is a waiting list of 300 applicants. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expense for the year 1975: 

INCOME : 

Rents and Interest $57,652.12 

State Aid 77,007.85 $134,659.97 

EXPENSES 

Administration $ 9,797.92 

Utilities 19,492.48 

Maintenance and Labor 16,348.80 

General Expense and Insurance 3,906.56 

Reserves & Debt Service 84,667.00 $134,212.76 

Surplus 447.21 

Total Expense and Surplus $134,659.97 

Elderly Housing Development 667-3 

On September 12, 1974, the Authority signed a construction contract with John 
Tocci & Son, to construct 96 apartments for elderly persons. 

Construction started October 1, 1974, completion is expected to be March, 
1976. 

The development cost of the Project as of December 31, is $1,973,096.00. 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

PROJECT 667-3 

Balance Sheet - December 31, 1975 

ASSETS 

Account #1111 Development Fond $ 28,556.10 

#1123.1 Accounts Receivable State Aid Mod. 95,502.00 

#1129 Material Stored 2,077.00 

#1170 Investments 460,172.36 

#1400 Development Cost 1,973,096.28 

#1500 Incomplete Contract 191,808.07 

Total Assets $2,751,211.81 

LIABILITIES 

Account #2112 Contract Retention $ 91,873.01 

#2123 Notes Authorized 2,455,000.00 

" #2132 Accrued Interest 12,530.73 

" #2400 Contract Awards 191,808.07 

Total Liabilities $2,7i>l ,211 .81 

37 



DEVELOPMENT FUND 

Colonial National Bank of Danvers $ 153,296.75 

Less Checks Outstanding 124,740.65 

Balance per Check Book and Ledger $ 28,556.10 



Recreation/Community Schools 



The Andover Recreation/ Community Schools Department is a unique concept. It 
is a vehicle by which a group, organization or individual can achieve recreation, 
social, cultural, educational or civic goals. An attempt is made to involve the 
community in the development of the community school program. The Department wish- 
es to be reflective of the community's interests and needs. One of the most effec- 
tive means of involving the community has been the active Recreation/Community 
Schools Committee presently chairmaned by Mr. James Flynn. Members of the commit- 
tee include Mrs. Patricia Saalfrank, Mr. Thomas Comparato, Mr. Richard Marciano, 
Mr. Robert Radula, Mrs. Douglas Mitchell, Mr. Charles Rancourt and Mr. Willis Gray. j 
The Committee works with the Director to develop efficient service processes for 
the communities involvement. 

With Fiscal Year 75 beginning July 1, 1974, the Andover Recreation/Community 
Schools started the second half of 1974 with two primary objectives. These were to 
(1) increase substantially the availability of summer recreational activities for 
residents of ages and (2) increase the number of academic and enrichment instruc- 
tional courses in the fall program. To facilitate accomplishment of these Town 
Meeting stated objectives, the Town Meeting body approved an operating budget of 
$145,330. With sufficient funding, the Department began implementing programs to 
meet the established objectives. 

The summer program was carefully studied and new programs were added in 
addition to the restructuring of the recreation programs previously offered. Qual- 
ity was an overriding concern. There was a new playground at Shawsheen School. 
The other playgrounds were located at West Elementary School, Doherty School, San- 
born School and Ballardvale Playground. Each of the playgrounds was expanded to 
include a larger enrichment/practical arts instructional program. Offered simul- 
taneously was an expanded program of recreational activities. 285 children attend- 
ed the playground program on a daily basis. Special event shows were presented to 
the community: The Boston Children's Theatre (200+ children); the family concerts 
(125+ people each evening) ; rock concerts (250+ students) ; family movies (80+ 
people); field trips to museums, amusement parks and ball games drew more than 150 
people each trip. While people were participating in these activities, other resi- 
dents were involved in Town men's and women's leagues; others utilized the gymnas- 
iums for a variety of purposes. An instructional program was also made available 
in activities such as drawing, painting, tennis, weight lifting and gymnastics. 
Schools and Town recreational facilities were utilized for all the summer programs 
of the Recreation/Community Schools Department. 

The single public swimming facility in Andover, Pomps Pond, had a successful 
year. The public beach was utilized by an average of 384 bathers per day. Swim 
competitions were held with prizes awarded. Two concerts and three senior citizen 
days were also held. The strong point of the public bathing beach activities is a 
good instructional swimming program. Over 350 children and adults received six 
weeks of instruction with certificates awarded to those successfully completing Red 
Cross tests. At the conclusion of the summer, ground work began for construction 
of the new bathhouse approved at the 1974 Town Meeting. The buildings were removed 
and the high knoll levelled to provide a wider, more usable beach. Construction 
was postponed when construction bids exceeded the sum of monies allocated by Town 
Meeting. 

In the fall of 1974 and the winter of 1975, two very successful registrations 

38 



were held for the academic and enrichment programs. The fall program listed 68 
course selections while the winter term listed 83 selections. 1,350 people regis- 
tered for the fall term and 1,440 people for the winter term. Concern was expressed 
by many in the community when more than 125 people had to be turned away due to 
lack of budget and space in the program. 

In January 1975, the Department was given funding under the Federal Comprehen- 
sive Employment and Training Act to hire an individual, requested in the proposed 
Fiscal Year 1976 budget. The Department was successful in hiring Mr. E. Mark Klempa, 
an individual with education and experience in recreation administration. Progress 
began to be made in fulfilling one of the Department's high priorities, i.e., the 
development of a comprehensive recreation program with particular emphasis on the 
junior-senior high programs. Recreation long-range planning began to be developed. 

The summer of 1975 was one in which the community again saw expansion of the 
leisure time opportunities by the Recreation/Community Schools Department. The 
concept of balancing physical education activities and practical skills classes was 
continued with expansion of the program to include South School. Rock concerts, 
family concerts, special trips, shows, puppeteers, Fun Services Carnival, National 
Children's Theatre, beach shuttles and the swimming program continued to draw large 
numbers of participants. The junior and senior high school programs in recreation 
and practical arts classes were expanded to include sculpture, typing, yoga and 
woodworking. Adults were also permitted to join where spaces remained. New Special 
Interest programs for various age groups included Project Challenge (14 students), 
Canoeing (22 students) . A Theatre Arts program and a Sports Camp were offered un- 
successfully. Two additional programs initiated the previous summer were Campcraft/ 
Nature (28 students) and the Basketball Clinic (95 students) . All summer programs 
showed a significant increase in participation. Summer playgrounds averaged 335 
children per day; the swimming registration increased to 485 people; and the Special 
Activities each increased participation significantly. The summer of 1975 was a 
success due to the variety of activity and community participation. 

Through the joint efforts of the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and 
the Recreation/Community Schools Department, a plan for the acquisition and devel- 
opment of the Doyle Property, located between Lowell Street and High Plain Road, 
was accepted by the Andover Board of Selectmen. Following authorization by Town 
Meeting, the 75-acre property was purchased to be administered under the auspices 
of the Conservation Commission and the Recreation/Community Schools Department. 
This is the first Town effort to acquire and use such property for both active and 
passive recreation purposes. 

In early October, with the cooperation of the Andover Artist's Guild, the 
Andover Recreation/Community Schools held their first Annual Art-In-The-Park. Over 
135 artists exhibited and sold their works to a large audience. The Andover Center 
Merchants donated $175.00 for three prizes to be awarded to show participants. 

The fall of 1975 also saw the first cooperative programming effort of the 
Phillips Academy Evening Study Program and the Recreation/Community Schools pro- 
gram. The programs were joined in one brochure utilizing identical, simultaneous 
registrations to better service the Andover community. This successful venture 
will be an annual effort. Within this fall program, the Recreation/Community 
Schools Department began with expansion of the entire Recreation/Community Schools 
program. The community has expressed an interest in increased enrichment and 
academic programing. A brochure was distributed to each Andover household listing 
101 programs. Registration was a great success with over 2,000 people partici- 
pating. Unfortunately, the Department had to turn away almost 300 people for lack 
of space. Almost every class had the maximum enrollment. The winter 1976 program 
was equally well received. 148 programs offered attracted over 2,000 people. Many 
classes were filled and more than 100 people were unable to participate. The 
winter 1976 program included programs which were not to begin until the spring of 
1976. This was an attempt to satisfy the community's request for spring programs. 
While the enrichment-academic program was in "high gear", the recreational oppor- 
tunities were also increasing with greater numbers participating. There were sev- 
eral new Special Events which included the Andy 500 Soapbox Derby, Volleyball 
Tournament and Ping Pong Tournament. Several vacation programs with a variety of 

39 



activities — bike repair clinic, roller skating, swimming, sand design, cross country 
ski clinic, ski race, skiing, toboggan race, movies, bike hike, family dinner, open 
gyms, crafts, bowling tournament were also held. The junior-senior high program in 
particular became a viable addition to existing programs. A comprehensive program 
of intramurals was assembled through a cooperative effort of the Recreation/Commun- i 
ity Schools Department and the Physical Education Department. Students were given 
the opportunity to involve themselves through boards established in their respec- 
tive schools. The coordination of the recreational services and the instructural 
enrichment/academic courses results in a comprehensive program of leisure time 
opportunities . 

The Recreation/Community Schools Department depends heavily on volunteers and 
paraprofessionals throughout the year. Special Education Bowling, Special Educa- 
tion Scouts, Special Education Little League, several instructional courses and 
many activities requiring supervisors are possible only because of volunteers. 
During 1974-1975, the Department involved over 250 people in supervisory and in- 
structional positions. These included playground personnel, waterfront personnel, 
Special Education Staff, maintenance, sports officials, instructors and supervisors. 

During the spring and summer of 1975, more than $3,000. worth of heavy wood 
playground equipment was installed in Andover Recreation Park. The Andona Society 
donated the playground which was installed in the heavy pines between the softball 
field and the sliding hill. Many family groups, school groups, social outings 
and individuals utilized the new equipment. 

From July 1, 1974 to December 31, 1975, the Recreation/Community Schools 
Department made huge strides to provide leisure-time activities for the general 
Andover population. At each stage, attempts were made to involve the community in 
the planning. The efforts produced new leisure activities and learning opportuni- 
ties. Many residents took advantage of these opportunities. It is the primary 
objective of the Recreation/Community Schools Department to respond to those activ- 
ities of an academic, enrichment and/or recreational nature requested by the com- 
munity. It was stated in the 1972 Annual Report that the Department should be 
community defined. The Department still believes that. 



Conservation Commission 



The purchase of the Doyle property off Lowell Street and High Plain Road was 
the single most important open space acquisition in 1975. The 75 acres of wooded 
upland will be developed and controlled by both the Conservation Commission and the 
Recreation Department. It will be devoted to mostly passive-type recreation with 
plans for nature trails and a skating pond, information center and two small parking 
areas. Application for Self-Help funding for this $300,000 purchase has been made 
to the Department of Natural Resources, now known as the Executive Office of En- 
vironmental Affairs, but funds are scarce and unavailable at this time. The State 
Planning Office seems at this point to be directing its economic aid toward urban 
centers, but every effort will be made for State assistance. The last Self-Help 
funded land for Andover was the Conway acquisition in October of 1974. On this 
5 1/2 acre parcel the reimbursement was $2,450.00, or half the purchase price. The 
only other completed acquisition for this period was the Morton land, 3.8 acres off 
Boston Road, $2,150.00, which adjoins several other parcels of tax title lands. 

The Town funds for Conservation acquisitions are now low. A 1970 bond funded 
special monies for land to be purchased along the Merrimack River and efforts are 
still being made to acquire frontage from property owned by Worthen, Jacobson and 
Langlois which will complete the chain of Open Space along the Merrimack. However, 
the Conservation Fund will be depleted when purchases have been made according to 
Articles approved in the 1975 Town Meeting. 



40 



The 1975 Annual Town Meeting approved the purchase of these parcels of land: 

1. The Chalifour land, 53 acres off the Forest Hills subdivision bordoring our 
water supply, Fish Brook. 

2. The Booth land, 14 acres off Salem Street, also bordering a water supply, the 
Skug River. 

3. The Aubut land, 2 acres off Bellevue Road. 
1. The above-mentioned Morton land. 

5. The Curtis Corp. land, 17 acres off High Plain Road, to add to the Doyle land. 

6. The Muller property, 13 acres off High Plain Road, to connect to the Doyle land 
and other Town-owned land behind the West Elementary School, plus the Andover 
Country Club. 

The Christy property, abutting the above-mentioned Morton land, about 5 1/2 
acres off Boston Road. 

Annual Town Meeting of 1975 also approved the transfer of several contiguous 
parcels of land acquired by the Town by tax title taking to the control of the Con- 
servation Commission. These lots are located off Rattlesnake Hill Road and abut 
both the Morton and Christy parcels. 

The Conservation Commission, acting under the newly revised Wetlands Protection 
Act and a set of appropriate regulations promulgated by the Commissioner of Natural 
Resources in November 1974, is now finding itself to be a full-fledged regulatory 
body, involved in almost all construction projects, both public and private, through- 
out the Town since wetlands are broadly defined by the law. During the period which 
is covered by this report, 24 Public Hearings have been held on proposed wetland 
projects. These require on-site inspections which add to the regular work of land 
acquisition, maintenance, planning, etc. To assist in the increased workload, a 
Registered Civil Engineer has been retained on a part-time basis and a Clerk- 
Secretary is employed two days per week. The Board of Health assists the Conserva- 
tion Commission in wetland determinations. The Commission is considering proposing 
that the Town adopt its own Wetland By-Law which would permit the Town to add consi- 
derations that are not in the State Law. 

The Trails Committee of the Commission has completed several new trails and has 
maps available at the Recreation/Community Schools office for those people interested 
in hiking, skiing or horseback riding (no motorized vehicles). A major contribution 
has been a five-color "Open Space" update map of the Town, clearly showing all the 
public and semi-public lands. The map is available for $1.00 at the Conservation 
Commission office in Town Hall. 

The Garden Committee has had an especially active year with adoption of by-laws 
governing the 55 gardeners on the former Shlakis land in West Andover close to the 
Merrimack River. Acquisition of a farm for the Town is also an interesting and 
worthwhile idea which requires more investigation. 

The Conservation Commission Chairman, Virginia Hammond, along with a Planning 
Board member, a Recreation-Community Schools member and a consultant are about to 
complete the revision of the 1970 Recreation-Open Space report. This work, involv- 
ing considerable research and analysis, has resulted in a most informative 35 page 
report including: an inventory of open space and recreational facilities; pro- 
posals for future development; philosophy underlying those proposals; and a prior- 
ity list for future acquisitions. 

First priority properties include: the remaining Fish Brook Wetlands; Sacred 
Heart land; Wood Hill; Skug River frontage; a study of the Andover Country Club. 

The Andover Conservation Commission seeks to save and enhance enough of the 
unique areas, water supplies and recreational sites to preserve the open character 
of Andover for this and coming generations. 



41 



Council on Aging 



The work of the Council On Aging is continuing to increase. The senior citi- 
zens of Andover are finding out that a call to the Haven provides many services 
that are conducive to a happier, fuller life. 

In February of 1975, the Council was fortunate in being able to secure the 
services of its first Senior Aide, Mrs. Jennie Faraci; and in April a second Senior 
Aide, Miss Amy Olenio, arrived. They are Outreach Social Workers who devote their 
efforts to reaching out to all senior citizens by way of telephone calls, home 
visits, Haven contacts, etc., for the purpose of finding those who need home care, 
home chore services or any assistance in coping with problems related to health, 
nutrition, housing, retirement and other adjustments to their style of living. 
They work in cooperation with the Merrimack Valley Home Care Center to supply sup- 
portive home care and home chore services aimed to prove that "There's No Place 
Like Home" is more than a grand old adage, and as people grow older, happy, fuller 
lives can be prolonged if they remain in familiar surroundings with loved ones. 

The daily hot lunch program has been moved from the East Junior High to the 
West Elementary School, with the cooperation of Mr. Richard Barron, Cafeteria Dir- 
ector. This is a very popular program. During the period from September 1975, to 
December 8, 1975, 2,559 hot lunches were served to the senior citizens of Andover. 
Mrs. Mildred White and her staff prepare and serve these lunches with care and con- 
cern for all the diners who are friends, neighbors, and loved ones. 

A "Spring Festival" was held at the West Elementary School in the spring. The 
Andover Male Choir provided entertainment for the evening. Two Christmas parties 
have been held at the West Junior High School. Last December, over 300 senior cit- 
izens attended the Christmas Party and were entertained by the pupils of the East 
Junior High School. 

With the help of the Recreation/Community Schools Department, many classes 
have been offered at the Haven, such as: Easy Body Movements, Bridge, Crewel, Oil 
Painting, How To Live With House Plants, Music For Joy, Dynamic Retirement, Knit- 
ting, Crocheting, Stuffing Toy Animals, Macrame, Claycraft, Sewing, Sculpture, 
Woodcarving, Acrylic Cloth Painting, and others. 

The Mini-Clinics serve a great need. During 1975, this service has been ex- 
tended to the Ballardvale area. When the new Housing-f or-the-Elderly opens, the 
Mini-Clinics will be added to this area. All appointments are taken at the Health 
Department Office. 

Many trips have been arranged for the senior citizens which they pay for them- 
selves. They have travelled to Nova Scotia; Ogunquit, Maine; Bermuda; and day 
trips to Newport, R.I.; Gloucester, Mass.; Durham, N.H.; and Cape Cod. Several 
theatre parties to the Chateau de Ville, Saugus , have been very well attended. 
Other parties held at the Haven were in celebration of Valentine's Day, New Year's 
Day, and more recently, an "English Tea Party" in preparation for the possibility 
of a trip to London and Andover, England. 

The Andocer Haven Associates hold a meeting on the third Thursday of every 
month at which time a movie is shown by Miss Nancy Richardson of the Memorial Hall 
Library staff. The officers of the Andover Associates are: Mr. Fred Yancy, Presi- 
dent; Mr. George Reynolds, Vice-President; Mrs. Ina Jowett , Secretary and Mr. 
Lester Thompson, Treasurer. 

Transportation for the senior citizens is a major need. The Haven station 
wagon is used for transportation to and from the hot lunch program, shopping trips 
and doctors' visits. This service needs to be expanded. 

42 



The activities and services offered at the Haven have increased the number of 
visitors and participants so that the Haven is filled to capacity and is now faced 
with another great need—more space. The Council is happy to be able to reach so 
many interested senior citizens. 

Memorial Hall Library 

With so much competing for time and attention today, it is significant that 
the Library has managed by all statistics to increase its use to the townspeople, 
not proportionately to new population, but improportionately to a much higher de- 
gree. 

Circulation of materials increased twelve percent this past year continuing 
the pattern of substantial yearly increases begun a number of years ago. The prob- 
lem of handling so much more work has provided the impetus for establishing the most 
excellent operation possible, except that it will be difficult to sustain unless in- 
creased help is forthcoming. 

The Town's support of the Library was manifested by the overwhelming support of 
Town Meeting to acquire the land (62 parking spaces) and the Theater building. The 
525 to 9 vote was most heartening. Room for future expansion of the Library is now 
assured. 

Especially successful programs of the many offered were "Woman Seen," a three- 
day series devoted to all aspects of womanhood; the Arts and Crafts daylong affair 
with weavers, woodcarvers, silversmiths, potters, painters, decoupage artists and 
the like; speed reading classes that proved so popular two had to be offered in the 
spring instead of one and two in the summer; "The Ascent of Man" series presented 
both afternoon and evenings; parents' craft programs cosponsered with the Stevens 
Library of North Andover, plus all the regular story hours and lectures. 

Film programs rate a special mention. The first children's film program series 
attracted an average of 128 parents and preschoolers at the two showings each Friday 
in the winter. The fourth series of Friday night adult feature films averaged 127 
people per showing, a most gratifying increase from the beginning series which av- 
eraged 47 people. 

The Ballardvale Branch of the Library under the direction of Mrs. Ruth Sharpe 
exhibited renewed vigor in sponsoring a great many special programs, the most pop- 
ular of which was "Old Ballardvale Days" that attracted well over 100 people - most- 
ly from "The Vale." 

The "Friends of Memorial Hall Library " have again contributed substantially to 
the Library. Nineteen volunteers performed services as diverse as typing and filing 
to delivering books to shut-ins, presenting films at nursing homes and sponsoring 
the book sale and programs. They also contributed an electrically operated screen 
for film viewing and a telephone-answering system for the reference department. 
They sponsored a Dessert for the Selectmen and Finance Committee to better acquaint 
them with the library, served tea for programs and presented Christmas programs each 
year that have already become a tradition. Notepaper with an ink drawing of the 
Library was commissioned and sold by the Friends. Their support and goodwill have 
been great assets to the Library. Patricia Edmonds's fine leadership as President 
has been missed but Nancy Muldoon got off to an early and successful beginning as 
the new president. 

Three special gifts to the Library this year stand out. "Lion Light," a fan- 
tasy-like 3' x 6' acrylic painting created by Corey Tevan and commissioned by the 
Trustees, now hangs in the Children's Room. A copy of the second verse of "America" 
in Samuel Smith's own handwriting was given to the Library. It is framed with a 
photograph of Smith as an elderly gentleman and can be seen in the Children's Room. 
The gift was given in memory of Jonathan Mark Langdell. And, lastly, a scale model 

43 



of the "Big Boy" locomotive fitted into a display case in the Children's Room was 
given in memory of John W. Bishop. 

Two proposals for Federal Funds were applied for through the Bureau of Library 
Extension- one for preservation of historical materials, particularly the Civil War 
etchings of which the Library has sixty, and the other to transcribe old radio show 
tapes to cassettes for showings to the elderly, particularly those in nursing homes, 
but to be available to all. Both were approved and are currently underway. 

Library Trustees have remained as they were except for the resignation of Dr. 
Fred Arragg, Treasurer. Mrs. Cornelia LeMaitre was appointed as new Trustee and 
Richard MacGowan assumed the office of Treasurer. 



An exceedingly good staff makes possible the high efficiency and excellent ser 
vice offered by the Library. Administrative appointments made were those of Mrs. 
Constance Smyth from Head of Reference to Assistant Director and Mrs. Barbara Pettus 
(formerly Wyper) from Reference Staff to Head of Reference. New staff members ap- 
pointed to fill vacancies were Samuel Simons, Linda Corsun, Ruth Hooten, Corey Tevan 
Darlene Antonucci, Evelyn Kuo, Sydelle Cohen and William Flanagan. Clarence Johnson 
head custodian, retired in December after many years of devoted service. Francis 
Latham was appointed head custodian in his place. 

The activity in the Library-just the many people who appear each day, numbering 
well into the hundreds-is an indication of the very vital service being offered. 
The Library is no longer a luxury; it has come to be a necessity for all. 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 






Adult 



Juvenile 



Total 



REGISTRATION OF 
BORROWERS 



BOOK STOCK & USE 
Vols, at end of 



1973-4 



3,849 



1974-5 



4,349 



1973-4 



1,085 



1974-5 



1,162 



1973-4 



4,934 



1974-5 



5,511 



reporting year 


92,657 


99,427 


26,600 


27,922 


119,257 


127,349 


Vols. Added 


11,944 


9,680 


2,392 


1,796 


14,336 


11,476 


Vols .withdrawn 


2,236 


2,910 


605 


476 


2,841 


3,386 


Vols. circulated 














(includes period- 














icals & pamph. ) 


330,306 


369,448 


134,029 


150,885 


464,335 


520,303 


INTERLIBRARY LOAN 


1973-4 


1974-5 










Books borrowed 


501 


958 










Books Loaned 


9,258 


12,491 










AUDIO-VISUAL 


Owned at 
porting 


end of re- 
year 


Added 


Withdrawn 




Circulated 


Fr. Prints 8s 














Sculpture 


300 


321 


24 


3 


1,282 


1,418 


Records 


5,375 


5,986 


710 


99 


25,583 


25,258 


Slides & Filmsts. 


1,510 


1,527 


26 


9 


289 


668 


Microf ilm/f iche 


3,793 


4,403 


610 


- 


- 


- 


Films (reels) 


246 


238 


23 


30 


3,243 


3,527 


Other (equipment 


& 












Children's puzzl 


es) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,765 


GRAND TOTAL CIRCULATION 


553,939 (1) 














(1) Statistics for the Ballardvale Branch of the library are included in the gen- 
eral figures. The total circulation amounted to 8,942. 



44 



LIBRARY STATISTICS (cont.) 
PERIODICALS & NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 

Gifts 
ACTIVITY GROUPS 

Adult Programs 

Story Hours/Preschool 

School Class Visits 

Other Juvenile Programs 
(Art, music, poetry, 
crafts, etc.) 

PERSONNEL 

Total Budget 
Personnel Services 
Personnel as percent 

of Total Budget 
Full-time personnel 
Part-time personnel 

Total Personnel 

PER CAPITA (based on '75 estimate 
of 26,000 population) 

BOOK STOCK 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 



1973-4 

406 

12 



1974-5 

411 

11 



108 


215 


165 


124 


58 


66 



182 



148 



$532,708 $584,783 



380,738 



71 . 5% 

21 

38 



405,790 



69% 

21 

38 



59 



4.77 

13.19 
(based on a 
12-month 
average) 



59 



4.9 



14.2 
(based on a 
12-month 
average) 



Figures represent the eighteen-month budget, not a twelve-month period. 



Traffic Committee 



The newly formed Traffic Committee met twice in November to consider traffic 
problems resulting from employees entering and leaving the Raytheon plant on Lowell 
Street, all-night parking ban on Cuba Street, the second access road to the Hewlett- 
Packard plant off River Road and Lupine Road at the condominiums. 

After reviewing the traffic flow to and out of the Lowell Street Raytheon 
plant, it was agreed that there were far less area traffic problems when there were 
no restrictions on turning movements at the Lowell Street entrance. This recom- 
mendation was then forwarded to the Selectmen who then reaffirmed that position. 

The Committee members attended a public hearing conducted by the Planning 
Board on the proposed second entrance to the Arkwright-Boston property for the Hew- 
lett-Packard plant in particular. After listening to the concerns to the affected 
residents, the Committee requested further investigation by Safety Officer Hastings, 
At the second meeting, and after receiving a report from Officer Hastings, the Com- 
mittee found the entrance as designed to be satisfactory and so reported to the 
Planning Board. The report contained suggestions relative to the future use of 



45 



River Road westerly of 1-93 and a review of the plans prior to the construction by 
Arkwright-Boston of the second road of this two-way road access way. 

After reviewing the situation present at a November accident on Lupine Road at 
the condominiums, it was agreed that it appeared advisable to recommend improvement 
of the sight distance on Lupine Road near its intersection with Henderson Avenue by 
lowering the grade. This matter is to be pursued in 1976. 

Bicentennial Committee 

Andover's Bicentennial celebration was officially started in May of 1975, after 
the April Town Meeting approved a budget of $17,000 for the observances. Choosing 
the theme: "The Spirit of '76" a week-long commemoration in the Town schools was 
held from May 26-31. Each school worked out its own program. In some cases, each 
grade had a special emphasis. Programs included quilt making, designing and orig- 
inal postage stamp and flags, posters, field day with sports and games of the Rev- 
olutionary Period, Colonial school rooms, Liberty Tree plantings and time capsules 
placed. 

After the traditional Memorial Day Parade, Andover became an official Bicenten- 
nial Town with the presentation of the Bicentennial Flag at ceremonies in front of 
Town Hall. 

The symbol of the Town's involvement in the Country's 200th birthday celebra- 
tion was chosen. The winning entry featured a star with the letter "A" at each 
point and a picture of our Town Hall in the center. Additionally, the emblem in- 
cluded red and white stripes. 

On April 19, 1975, bells in Andover churches, schools and civic places were 
rung 41 times to memorialize the number of colonists killed in the opening shots of 
the American Revolution. 

The Bicentennial Committee sounded a call for townspeople interested in reac- 
tivating the Minuteman Company of Andover. A Company was formed, dressed in au- 
thentic clothes with new muskets and young fifers. They made their first public ap- 
pearance on June 20, 1975. 

By the Fourth of July, the Bicentennial Information Booth was ready to be open- 
ed and the Calendar of Events sign was erected. At the booth, tricorner hats, logo 
buttons, Historical Guides, books and maps were ready for sale. 

Nancy Stack was hired through the joint effort of the Andover Historical Com- 
mission and the Bicentennial Committee to conduct a survey of the Town's homes. 
Her study was conducted in order to gain more knowledge of how Andover was developed 
and in what order. 

In October the Bicentennial Committee hosted one day of the visit of the Mayor 
of Andover, England, by presenting him and his family with gifts and a tour of the 
Town, a Minuteman demonstration and lunch. 

In October, 1975, the Town was alive with adventures in art and history. Bus 
riders viewed historic Andover homes on the four Sundays of the month. Costumed 
guides, history, tall tales, cider, gingerbread and sugar cookies provided the tour 
participants with fun and adventure. 

A limited edition of registered, numbered sterling silver medallions commemora- 
ting the American Revolution were minted and made available in late November. Un- 
numbered pewter medallions were also produced. The Town Seal was depicted on one 
side and the other side depicted the busts of Samuel Phillips, Sr. , and Samuel 
Phillips, Jr., legislators, educators and benefactors of the Andover Revolutionary 
Period. Andover's Bicentennial logo and a cannon symbolizing Andover's Gunpowder 
Mill were also part of the design. The Town archives was presented with the No."l" 

46 



medallion. 

A Bicentennial quilt was started and is being completed by many talented quilt- 
makers. This quilt will also be given to the Town archives. 

An Historical District Study Committee was formed to investigate the possibil- 
ity of establishing an Historical District within the boundaries of the Town. And- 
over received a grant from the State in the amount of $3,000 in matching funds to 
develop this Historic District. 

Upcoming events of the Bicentennial program are as follows: a publication of 
Andover's participation in the American Revolution; a play depicting Andover's in- 
volvement in the Revolution; a parade and old-fashioned picnic on May 9th; craft 
show on May 16th; house tour and flower show on May 16th, 23 and 30th; Bicentennial 
Ball on May 21st; photograph exhibit on "Andover Then and Now"; old tool collection; 
historical data on the Gunpowder Mill; ecumenical service; breakfast; fireworks and 
day-long activities on July 4, 1976. 



Veterans' Services 



The present Chapter 115 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth relating to 
Veterans and their dependents provides for two major programs. One pertains to 
services, the other to financial aid and assistance for those who qualify. Before 
financial aid is given, each case is thoroughly investigated and all information ob- 
tained is treated with the strictest confidence to protect the applicant. The Town 
is reimbursed 50% by the State for costs expended for this aid to the needy veterans, 

This office has worked diligently to reduce direct Town expenditures of funds 
in the past eighteen months and has obtained many thousands of dollars in Federal 
Funds for veterans and their dependents. When a veteran is in need of hospitaliza- 
tion, arrangements are made for his admission to one of the Veterans Administration 
facilities. This represents a substantial savings in the expenditures of this 
office. 

Other services provided include advising and counseling veterans in their 
rights and priviledges under the constantly changing Federal laws, such as compen- 
sation for service-connected cases, pensions for widows and children, medical care, 
insurance, education, home loans, Social Security matters and supplemental security. 

Chapter 115 also provides proper burial of the veteran with financial assis- 
tance if necessary. In addition, the law requires that all veteran graves will be 
properly cared for and decorated. The Veterans' Director acts as Burial Agent and 
Graves Registration Officer for this purpose. 

During the past eighteen months, 49 veterans died in Andover; 15 World War 
One, 31 World War Two and three Korean Campaign men. The dependents of these vet- 
erans were contacted and assisted in applying for the burial allowance of $400. 
or $800, as qualified, headstones or markers for the graves and insurance. 

The law also provides that records of military service will be kept and become 
a permanent record of the community. There are presently 4,542 such records on 
file in this office. 

Memorial Day and Veterans' Day services are coordinated through this office 
with the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2128 and the American Legion Post 8. During 
the past two Veterans' Day services, a memorial service was conducted at the Ste- 
vens Street Bridge over the Shawsheen River, where a wreath was thrown onto the 
water as a tribute to all sailors and marines whose bodies were lost or buried at 
sea. 

The duties of this office as Selective Service Registrars have been discontinu- 
ed since the Government has ruled that, at the present time, there will no longer 

47 



be a registration of young men for potential induction and processing into the arm- 
ed forces. 

This Department enjoys a State reputation for excellent community service and 
will continue to serve Andover veterans and their dependents with information and 
advice on all current changes in State and Federal benefits. 






AVIS 



On December 1, 1975, the Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS) purchased 
from Phillips Academy a 3.81 acre parcel of land situated on the northerly side of 
Salem Street, with a frontage of 577 feet. The parcel abuts the AVIS Skug River Res 
ervation on its northwesterly boundary, and the AVIS Edmond E. Hammond Reservation 
on its northerly boundary. 

The deed stipulates that the parcel shall be held permanently for conservation 
and recreational purposes, shall remain open to the public and no building shall be 
erected thereon. The land is wooded, and part is wet in the spring. It is intended 
to retain it in its natural condition. This is the last piece of land in this area 
on the northerly side of Salem Street which is available for conservation. 

This acquisition is in accord with the policy of AVIS to protect the Town's 
water supply, and the prohibition of any construction on the land removes the pos- 
sibility of any polluting drainage entering the Skug River. This acquisition in- 
creases the holdings of AVIS on the northerly side of Salem Street, including the 
two abutting AVIS reservations, to 28.7 acres. The Conservation Commission owns a 
parcel of land comprising 9.3 acres abutting the AVIS land, and this, combined with 
the AVIS land, gives a total of 38.0 acres of conservation land in this vicinity. A 
joint trail system has been laid out through the Conservation Commission land and 
AVIS lands which connects Gray Road with Salem Street, which will become a section 
of the Town trail system. The new acquisition of Avis will be connected into this 
system. 

Late in the spring of 1974, a proposal had been made by the Corps of Engineers 
to run an intercepting sewer along the southerly bank of the Merrimack River from 
Lowell to the new sewage disposal plant down river. This would have invaded and 
seriously damaged AVIS laids , including the Spalding and Deer Jump Reservations, so 
AVIS made a vigorous protest and the Corps withdrew its proposal. As a follow up, 
in order to assure the protection of those AVIS lands in the future, a "Memorandum 
of Understanding" between the Board of Selectmen and AVIS was signed on February 10, 
1975, which states: "The Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover and the Andover 
Village Improvement Society (AVIS) share a concern with the possible extension or 
improvement of the Town's sewer system across or in the immediate vicinity of prop- 
erty owned or controlled by AVIS along the shoreline of the Merrimack River. There- 
fore, the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover and AVIS hereby agree as follows 
Before final design for any extension or improvement of the Town's sewer system 
across or in the immediate vicinity of property owned or controlled by AVIS along 
the shoreline of the Merrimack River, the Town shall make every effort to avoid the 
intrusion of the sewer system on land owned or controlled by AVIS." 

A series of informative articles, written by Lyn Beattie, were run in the Towns 
man, describing the features of a number of AVIS reservations, including Deer Jump, 
Baker's Meadow, Indian Ridge, Harold R. Rafton, Shawsheen River and Rocky Hill. Thes 
served to familiarize our citizens with these AVIS properties. Articles on the othe: 
reservations will follow. Of course, all AVIS reservations are open to the public 
without charge. 

Jim Christopher appeared before the Committee on Taxation at the State House in 
Boston on several bills affecting the interests of AVIS. 

Phil Nelson, with the assistance of Andover High School students, laid out a 
nature trail on Deer Jump Reservation. 

48 



The annual snowshoe and ski outing was held, as usual, in mid-winter on the 
Harold R. Rafton Reservation, with Phil Dargie in charge. Also, the annual canoe 
races and family outing were held in early May on the Shawsheen River Reservation, 
under direction of Robin Moseley. A new feature instituted in the fall of 1975, 
was a family picnic and hike in Deer Jump Reservation. All these are open to the 
public. The local papers should be consulted for dates. 

There are a number of streams running through AVIS reservations, as well as a 
number of wet areas across which run AVIS trails. Considerable effort has been de- 
voted to bridging these streams and wet areas for the convenience of hikers. Bridges 
were constructed on the following reservations: Deer Jump (including one over 
Fish Brook), BaKer's Meadow, Taf t , Shawsheen River, Vale (not yet completed), and 
across the wet area on the AVIS property extending from the ridge behind the high 
school to Reservation Road. Nat Smith, Dave Batey, Phil Nelson and others partici- 
pated in this work, assisted by Phillips Academy and high school students, and in 
one case by trail committee members . 

AVIS was fortunate in receiving several legacies from devoted friends who had 
passed away. These are greatly appreciated and constitute the funds with which AVIS 
is able to acquire land for its reservations. It should be remembered that all AVIS 
lands have either been donated to AVIS as gifts or purchased with the proceeds of 
such legacies, so that no public funds have ever been expended in their acquisition 
or maintenance. The Town has thus received the benefit of these private benefac- 
tions . 

Historical Commission 

The Andover Historical Commission has been concentrating its efforts on expand- 
ing historical information about the Town in several ways. In the fall of 1974, 
Commission member Philip A. Dargie located very important architect's maps done 
during Shawsheen Village's early development. These were deposited in the Andover 
Historical Society archives. Mr. Dargie further determined that the stone building 
in Shawsheen Village is definitely not a replica of Washington's Valley Forge head- 
quarters and does not resemble any building in the Valley Forge area. 

In May, 1975, the Commission published a comprehensive Historical Brochure which 
gives an overview of the Town's history. The brochure has a map locating sixteen 
illustrated sites of major interest and nineteen additional places of interest. It 
was first made available at the Bicentennial Booth, and new residents found it most 
informative as have older residents whose interest in local history has been re- 
kindled by the Bicentennial. The brochure is available at the Town Clerk's office 
and Memorial Hall Library. 

The Commission, in partnership with the Bicentennial Committee, hired a Preser- 
vation Planning Consultant, Nancy J. Stack, to conduct an architectural survey of 
the Town. Approximately 700 structures were recorded on Massachusetts Historical 
Commission survey forms and rated as to their historic and architectural value. 
After further research and additions by the Commission, these forms will be copied 
and made available to the public. This type of survey is required of all Massa- 
chusetts Historical Commissions and will aid the Town in future planning to retain 
its heritage and individual character. 

With an eye to the preservation of the Town's historical assets, the Commission 
supported the creation of an Historic District Study Committee and is represented on 
that committee by Commission member Donald P. Hayes, Jr. The Commission gave its 
approval to the application by Phillips Academy to have their campus designated a 
National Historic District. Commission member Col. Edward Harris is representative 
to the Essex Co. Historic and Scenic Planning Commission. In December 1975, the 
Commission voted to oppose the location of a post office facility on Andover Street 
and Argilla Road and informed the Selectmen of that vote. 

The Historical Commission has worked and cooperated with the Andover Bicenten- 
nial Committee through its representative on that committee, Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 

49 



On Wednesday, October 15, 1975, Commission member Philip A. Dargie, with repre- 
sentatives of the Andover Historical Society and the Bicentennial Committee, hosted 
the Mayor of Andover, England, on an historic tour of Andover following the outline 
of the Historical Brochure. 

The Commission has regretfully accepted the resignation of Mr. Arthur E. Kerwien 
who has moved out of state. Mr. Kerwien's diligence was largely responsible for 
obtaining National Register status for the Benjamin Abbot Homestead. 

The Andover Historical Commission meets at 7:30 on the third Monday of the 
month in the Memorial Hall Library. Interested townspeople are invited to attend. 



Fourth of July Celebration 



The 1975 Fourth of July Celebration, which was the sixth Andover celebration, 
was the first profitable one in the last four years. While there are many variables 
such as weather, the sudden increase in food costs two years ago and certain one- 
time investments that can affect income and expenses, the Committee feels that the 
combination of the increased ticket sales (although well within the "old-time price" 
concept established in 1970) and the well-executed planning and cost controls helped 
to yield the financial success of 1975. 

Following is a Statement of Income and Expenses for the 1975 Celebration: 

Income: Ticket sales $ 3, 165.00 
Donations 347.00 
Sale of balloons (at fireworks) 56.93 

$ 3,568.93 
Transfer of Town Appropriated Funds* 2,800.00 

Total Income $ 6,368.93 

Expenses: Music $ 1,300.00 

Food, ingredients, equipment 1,961.27 

Rides 1,275.00 

Prizes, awards, badges 845.65 

Balloons 278.05 

Advertising 116.55 

Misc. paint and supplies 78.28 5,854.80 

Net Profit: $ 514.13 

*An additional $1,700.00 of funds appropriated by the Town and $500.00 donated 
by the Andover Companies was not transferred to this Committee. As has been 
the custom in the past years, the Town has used these funds to pay directly 
for the fireworks display. 



STATEMENT OF RETAINED EARNINGS 
as of November 30, 1975 



Beginning Balance $ 35.00 

Profit from 1975 Celebration 514 . 13 

Ending Balance $549.13 



50 



Board of Health 



SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS 



A. General: 

1. A three-year program plan was developed delineating objectives, pri- 
orities and costs of existing as well as proposed new programs. 

2. A number of Food Training programs were conducted for management and 
personnel of food establishments. 

3. Lead poisoning clinics were established during October, 1975 and will 
be conducted on a monthly basis. 

4. New subsurface sewage disposal regulations became official as of 
August 14, 1975. 

5. Income from licensing increased 22% over that for the prior 18-month 
period as follows: 



Period 

1/1/73 to 6/30/74 
7/1/74 to 12/31/75 
PROGRAMS (See Charts I, II, and III) 
A. Personal Health: 



No. Licenses 
2,118 
1,665 



Income 
$14,953. 
$18,266. 



General: 

These services accounted for 34% of all services conducted and about 
22% of the total manhours of time available in the Department. These 
services increased almost 57% above those for the eighteen month 
period of January 1, 1973 through June 30, 1974. 

More significant is the shift in emphasis of individual service areas 
as indicated in the following Table: 





73/74 


74/75 




Percent Increase/ 




Percent of 


Percent 


of 


Decrease 


Service 


Services 


Services 




73/74 vs. 74/75 


Communicable 










Disease 


82.5 


36.0 




- 33.7 


Child Health 


3.5 


13.9 




+505.0 


Geriatrics 


6.7 


32.5 




+631.8 


Lead Poisoning 


- 


6.6 






Other 


7.3 


11.0 




+130.4 


TOTAL 


100.0 


100.0 






Clinic Operations: 











a. Flu Clinics for Senior Citizens were held in the Fall of 1974 and 
1975, immunizing an average of 272 people each year. 

b. Mini-Clinics for Senior Citizens were held several times a month 



51 



between September and June providing service to about 600 people. 
Some of the individual services provided were: 

1. Blood Pressure, pulse and respiration testing. 

2. Hemoglobin testing. 

3. Diabetes testing. 

4. Counseling on individual health and social problems. 

5. Referrals to other private and official agencies and practic- 
ioners in the Greater Lawrence area. 

c. Blood Lead Testing clinics are conducted monthly and serviced 270 
children between October and December 1975. 

Two children were found to have elevated blood lead levels, and 
one child was found to be anemic. 

d. T.B. Clincs are held upon request and 146 people were tested during 
the period. No active cases of T.B. were discovered. 

e. Rabies immunization clinics sponsored by the Health Department and 
conducted by the Town Animal Inspector who immunized 645 dogs in 
Spring of 1975. 

B. Gas, Plumbing and Sewer Inspection: 



These services dropped almost 23% below that for the 73/74, 18-month 
period . 

Services over the last five years were as follows: 

% Deviation from 
Year Services Average per Month 5 Year Average 



1971 


2,839 


237 


+36 


1972 


1,537 


128 


-26 


1973 


2,378 


198 


+ 14 


1974 


1,937 


161 


- 8 


1975 


1,764 


147 


-16 


5 Yr. 


Avg.2,091 


174 





In addition to Plumbing, Gas and Sewer Inspections, the Plumbing Inspector 
inspects all building sewer hook-ups between the structure and the septic 
tank which amounted to 184 additional inspections for the 18-month period 
from July 1, 1974 through December 31, 1975. 

Conservation: 



Conservation work, at the request of the Conservation Commission, was cur- 
tailed by the Commission in July 1975; however, the Department continues 
to work independently in this area as required by Chapter 5, Section II of 
the Board of Health Regulations "Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems" and 
make referrals to the Conservation Commission, as necessary. 

Time formerly allocated to this activity will be utilized in the expanding 
Food Program (About 3% of all available manhours) . 

D. Disposal Works (Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems) 

1. Services accounted for 24% of all services and increased 29% above 
that for the previous 18-month period. These services required 31% 
of the total manhours of time available whereas the previous period 
required 34% of the available manhours. 

The following shows the increase in services in this program over the 

52 



last four years: 

Year Services % Deviation from 

4 Year Average 



Services 




912 


1 


808 


1 


986 


2 


,807 



1972 912 -51 

1973 1,808 - 4 

1974 1,986 + 6 

1975 2,807 +49 

4 Yr. Average 1,878 

Enforcement work increased one hundred and seventy-four (174) percent 
above that for the previous 18-month period. 

The new Subsurface Sewage Disposal System Regulations, Chapter 5, 
Andover Board of Health Regulations became effective in August 1975. 
Amendments to Chapter 5 were published September 11, 1975 and Novem- 
ber 6, 1975. 



E. Food: 

1. This work accounted for about 7% of all services for this period and 
increased about 82% above that for the previous 18-month period. Time 
utilized in this program accounted for about 15% of all available man- 
hours whereas the previous 18-month period utilized only about 4% of 
the available manhours . 

2. Enforcement work was up 800% above that for the previous 18-month 
period . 

F. Requests for Service: 

1. These services were to resolve complaints in many areas such as: 

a . Promiscuous Dumping 

b. Air Pollution 

c. Noise Pollution 

d. Defective Subsurface Sewage Systems 

e. Water Pollution 

f. Inadequate Housing Facilities 

g. Dilapidated Structures 
h. Vermin Infestations 

i. Fires in Homes and Public Establishments 

The above are not necessarily all of the areas of problems investi- 
gated. 

2. Services were 123% greater in number for this period than in the prior 
18-month period and required about 4% of all available manhours. 

3. Almost one-half of all enforcement actions of the Department dealt 
with these services and increased 600% above that for the prior 18- 
month period. Promiscuous dumping accounted for 75% of the enforce- 
ment actions in this service area. 

G. Other Services: 

1. These services include all those not delineated above, such as stables, 
hog farms, special meetings, Board of Health meetings, etc. 

2. These services accounted for about 13% of the services for this period 
and 6% of the available manhours. Also, these services were about 43% 
higher for this period than the previous 18-month period. 

53 



CONCLUSIONS, RECOMMENDATIONS & PROJECTIONS 

1. The needs and demands of Andover's citizens for services increased signifi- 
cantly during this last 18-month period in all programs except plumbing, 
gas and sewer inspections and communicable disease work. 

It is expected that work in the following service areas will continue to 
increase: 

a. Geriatrics work will increase with the opening of another clinic site 
early in 1976 and possible addition of services at clinics. 

b. Lead Poisoning work is expected to increase because this is generally 
accepted as a seasonal type disease in which clinical symptoms are more 
prevalent in the spring and summer. 

c. Disposal Works services are expected to increase because of the re- 
quirements stipulated in the new Code; however, this also will be con- 
tingent upon the prospects of new construction that may be initiated 
in 1976. 

d. Food work should increase somewhat in 1976 depending upon the demands 
placed upon the Department for Disposal Works services. 

The Department has about the same problem with Food regulations that 
previously existed with the Disposal Works Systems Regulations prior 
to 1975. The Food Regulations exist with both the State and the Local 
Board of Health and the latter are fragmented by a number of amend- 
ments, and contradictions are not uncommon. To clarify this situation 
for the Department and those subject to regulation, it is planned to 
consolidate and upgrade the Food Regulations in 1976. 

Review of the records of inspection of food establishments indicates 
that about 60% of them have construction problems of the structure or 
their equipment that contributes to unsatisfactory operational methods. 
These problems may be corrected within time depending upon the severity 
of the problem and availability of funds. 

Operational problems have been found in almost 90% of the food estab- 
lishments; and while being the easiest to correct, in most instances, 
they continue to present problems because they are directly related to 
work practices of the food handler, and the food industry has one of 
the highest turnover rates of employees in the nation. The only appar- 
ent answer to this problem is constant surveillance to help afford 
some degree of assurance to food establishment customers. 

e. Gas, Plumbing and Sewer Inspection work may increase or decrease de- 
pending upon construction demands. Because of the many administrative 
changes introduced by the State Plumbing Board, individual inspections 
may be more time consuming in the near future. 

2. The increase in services have demanded increased administrative control 
procedures and broadened the communication problems considerably. This in 
effect places additional clerical work on the Department which is already 
seriously understaffed in this capacity. 



. 



54 



CHART I 



SERVICES RENDERED BY PROGRAMS 















% 


INCREASE OR 


JAN 


. 1, 1973 TO 


% OF 


JULY 


1, 1974 TO 


% OF 




DECREASE 


PROGRAMS JUNE 30, 1974 


TOTAL 


DEC. 


31, 1975 


TOTAL 


73/74 


vs 74/75 


Personal 


















Health 


3,381 


28.1 




5,298 


34.0 




+ 


56.7 


Gas, Plumbing, 


















Sewer 


3,354 


27.8 




2,592 


16.7 




- 


22.7 


Conservation 


218 


1.8 




265 


1.7 




+ 


21.6 


Disposal Works 


2,897 


24.0 




3,744 


24.1 




+ 


29.2 


Food 


558 


4.6 




1,036 


6.7 




+ 


82.1 


Requests for 


















Service 


276 


2.3 




615 


4.0 




+ ' 


L22.8 


Other 


1,381 


11.4 




1,980 


12.8 




+ 


43.4 


TOTAL 


12,065 


100.0 




15,510 


100.0 




+ 


28.6 



Total Services Jan. 
Total Services Jan. 
Total Services Jan. 
Total Services Jan. 



- Dec. 1972 were 4,998 

- Dec. 1973 were 7,632 

- Dec. 1974 were 9,299 

- Dec. 1975 were 10,557 



CHART II 




MANPOWER UTILIZATION BY PROGRAMS 








TOTAL MANHOURS 


% 


TOTAL 


MANHOURS 


HRS. AV. 


TIME PER SERV. 




JAN. '73 


JULY '74 


JAN. '73 


JULY' 


74 


JAN. '73 




JULY '74 




TO 


TO 




TO 


TO 




TO 




TO 


PROGRAMS 


JUNE '74 


DEC. '75 


JUNE '74 DEC. 


75 


JUNE '74 




DEC. '75 


Personal Serv. 


2,117 


3,356 




19.1 


21 


5 


0.6 




0.6 


Gas, Plumbing, 




















Sewers 


3,547 


3,073 




31.9 


19 


7 


1.1 




1.2 


Conservation 


210 


417 




1.9 


2 


7 


1.0 




1.6 


Disp. Works 


3,789 


3,905 




34.2 


31 


4 


1.4 




1.0 


Food 


407 


2,256 




3.7 


14 


5 


0.7 




2.2 


Req. for Serv. 


276 


620 




2.5 


4 





1.1 




1.0 


Other Services 


746 


971 




6.7 


6 


2 


0.5 




0.5 


TOTALS 


11,092 


15,598 




100.0 


100 





0.9 




1.0 


CHART III 




NUMBER OF 


SERVICES 


BY ACTIVITIES 








JAN. 1973 


TO JUNE 1974 


JULY 1974 


TO ] 


DEC. 1975 


% 


INC. OR DECR. 




SERVICES 


% OF TOTAL 


SERVICES 


% 


OF TOTAL 


OF 


74/75 OVER 


















73/74, 18-MONTH 


ACTIVITIES 


















PERIOD 


Educational 




















Services 


2,117 


17.5 




3, 


972 




25.6 




87.6 


Inspection, 




















Investigation 


















& Survey 


9,796 


81.3 




10, 


935 




70.5 




11.6 


Enforcement 


53 


0.4 






184 




1.2 




247.2 


Coordination 




















With Other 




















Agencies 


99 


0.8 






419 




2.7 




323.2 


TOTALS 


12,065 


100.0 




15, 


510 




100.0 




28.6 



55 



Greater Lawrence Community Drug Council 



This program operates by contract agreement with the Town of Andover with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen and under the auspices of the Board of Health. 
The program operates the following services in the Greater Lawrence area: 

1. A Drug Treatment and Prevention Educational Program to the communities and 
the school systems, including presentations to various Health and Youth 
Problem courses on the topics of: mental health, family and interpersonal 
dynamics, emotions and self-expression. These presentations were so suc- 
cessful, that in 1975, they were offered as a regular part of the Youth 
Problem course curriculum. 

2. Maintains counseling centers including two in Andover; (a) the Ballardvale 
Connection located in the Ballardvale Community Center, Andover Street, 
and (b) the Andover Connection Counseling Center located at 77 Main Street 
which functions as the structured group and youth/family counseling center. 

3. Maintains an Alternative Learning School (currently being evaluated for 
766 approval) out of the Methuen Counseling Center. The school works in 
conjunction with the Methuen High School where each student received morn- 
ing instruction in his/her academic requirement courses. During the after- 
noon, the Alternative Learning Program provides courses involving develop- 
mental and self-learning oriented activities, in a supportive, flexible 
and effective, informal environment. The courses are instructed by three 
teacher/counselors . 

4. Run women's and adolescent groups focusing on growth and learning/sharing 
experiences out of the two Andover facilities. 

Monthly reports of the program indicate the following: 

July 1, 1974 - December 31, 1974; 90 Andover residents were reported to 
have been rendered services in one or more of the four service areas 
totaling: 119 individual sessions, 656 storefront visits, 16 parent 
counseling sessions, 1 school visit, and 19 consultations to probation 
officers, guidance personnel and other mental health workers. 

January 1, 1975 - December 31, 1975: 386 Andover residents were serviced 
in one or more of the following areas totaling: 850 drop-in visits, 187 
individual sessions, 15 school visits (to counsel individual students, or 
to act as resource for guidance personnel), 11 school presentations, 29 
consultations, 19 art therapy sessions, 16 parent counseling sessions, 9 
crisis interventions, 13 relaxation and body awareness groups, 29 family 
sessions, 21 home visitations, weekly rap groups, 4 communal dinner and 
movie nights, 2 group educational trips involving 17 adolescents. 

The Andover Storefront was staffed by Wilfred Harvey and Barbara Galvin from 
July - November, 1974. 

Michael Burkart and Barbara Zeidwerg staffed the Andover Storefront, located 
in the Shawsheen Plaza from December, 1974 - July 31, 1975 when the facility had 
to be closed due to substantial State funding cutbacks. 

In November, 1975, the Ballardvale Connection opened as an adolescent drop-in 
center run by Barbara Zeidwerg and Pam Burt. In December, 1975, the second Andover 
facility opened at 77 Main Street due to a re-allocation of available monies. 

The task of the Andover outreach team is now to treat the troubled adolescent 
through informal, free, and professional individual and family counseling, before 

56 



the conflict manifests itself into drug, alcohol, or maladjusted sexual and social 
problems. For the adolescent in conflict, the outreach team often acts as an in- 
termediary, or buffer, with parents, school authorities, and problem peer relation- 
ships. The outreach counseling staff also served as an informative and available 
resource to parents, guidance personnel, church, and other mental health workers in 
community-helping agencies. A proposal to implement an in-school developmental 
center within Andover High School is currently being considered. The center would 
augment existing guidance and personnel counseling activities, offering groups 
focusing on self and interpersonal growth. 



Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee 

Elected officials from Lawrence, Methuen, North Andover and Andover 
established the Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee (GLSWC) , and have been 
meeting at least monthly. Each community is represented by an elected official 
and has one vote. Selectman Edmund J. Sullivan, Jr. is Andover 's voting member, 
and Town Manager J. Maynard Austin and Director of Public Works Robert E. McQuade 
make up the Town's committee. 

The goals of this Committee are to investigate various methods of solid 
waste disposal (excluding sanitary landfill) and recommend a site and determine 
costs involved with such disposal. To date this Committee has concentrated on 
resource-recovery facilities. 

On January 24, 1974, the Bureau of Solid Waste Disposal for the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, acting through its Director, Mr. Alden E. Cousins, announced 
that the Greater Lawrence area had been selected as the first area in which the 
State would concentrate its efforts on a cooperative basis with the surrounding 
communities to establish a solid waste disposal facility. 

Haverhill, Groveland, Salisbury and Plaistow, Hew Hampshire, have voted 
to join this Committee. 

In June 1974, the Mitre Corporation was retained by the Bureau of Solid 
Waste Disposal to act as consulting engineers for this project. 

The municipalities comprising the GLSWC were asked to nominate sites for a 
regional disposal facility based on criteria developed jointly by the Committee 
and the Bureau. Eight sites were nominated and were reviewed and evaluated by a 
team comprising representatives of the GLSWC, the Bureau, Mitre and all other 
appropriate State and Federal agencies. Based on this evaluation, a 40-acre 
parcel of land in the Ward Hill Neck area of Haverhill was recommended as the 
preferred location for the facility. 

In October 1974, the process of selecting the most appropriate technology 
and facility operator was initiated. 

In November 1974, a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) was issued to 45 
potential bidders throughout the country. Over 20 firms responded to this RFQ, 
and in December 1974, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was issued to 20 qualifying 
firms. The RFQ was designed to stimulate innovative response and thus no specific 
resource recovery processes or products were stipulated. 

In March 1975, six proposals were received for evaluation. Of these six, 
essentially two different technologies were offered with variations in each. 
These included incineration for the generation of electric power and refuse derived 
solid fuel processing to be used as a supplement to fossil fuels in utility or 
industry boilers. An evaluation group was formed comprising representatives of the 
GLSWC, the Bureau, Mitre and the Federal and State specialists. The evaluation was 
conducted by three teams, each responsible for one of three major criteria; tech- 
nical, environmental, and economic. At the conclusion of this evaluation, three 
finalists were selected for further negotiations in May 1975. 

57 



In the selection of an ultimate finalist, subsequent evaluation included the 
verification of markets with potential energy customers, examination of financing 
methods, and resolution of additional technical and environmental issues. This 
further evaluation and selection process culminated in the selection of Universal 
Oil Products (UOP) , as the preferred contractor to design, construct and operate 
a 3,000 ton per day (TPD) resource recovery facility. The selection of UOP was 
based upon five major considerations: proven technology, strong markets (UOP has 
a 20-year contract for sale of all electric power to the Massachusetts Electric 
Company), strong financial and management capabilities, environmental soundness, 
and low disposal fee of approximately $5.00 per ton at the door. 

In the late fall the Haverhill City Council voted to rescind its site for 
this facility and plans are underway for GLSWC to make a further presentation to 
the City of Haverhill in order to clarify its stand and to review other proposed 
sites for this facility. 

A great deal of work remains to be completed before all the information is 
obtained in order to properly present a proposal to Town Meeting for its review. 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 



The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District consists of the following communities: 
Methuen, Lawrence, North Andover, and Andover. It is charged with providing treat- 
ment facilities for all waste water discharged into the Merrimack River from the 
member communities. 

Bids for the construction of this project were received and divided into five 
contracts as follows: 

Contract No. 1 - Wastewater Treatment Plant that includes the Administration 
Building, Plant Water Pumping Station, Activated Sludge 
Pumping Station, Main Electrical Distribution Building, 
Flotation Building and the Process and Maintenance Building. 
As of December 31, 1975 this contract was 74 percent complete, 

Contract No. 2 - Pumping Station was 69 percent complete as of December 31, 
1975. 

Contract No . 3 - Intercepting Sewers, 85 percent complete. 

Contract No. 4 - Intercepting Sewers, 58 percent complete. 

Contract No. 5 - Wastewater Meter Stations, 100 percent complete. 

The total project cost is estimated to be $53 , 650, 000, of which the local share 
is $6,050,000 or approximately 11 percent, with the remainder consisting of Federal 
and State grants. The entire project is scheduled to be completed by January 1977; 
however, the present progress indicates that the plant will be operating during the 
fall of 1976. 

The first year 's operation and maintenance cost is estimated at $1,500,000, 
of which Andover 's share will be approximately 12.5 percent or $187,500. The 
Town's share of the capital cost is 8.0 percent of the District cost and a bond 
issue was made resulting in annual cost of approximately $50,000. 

As part of the Federal Grant Agreement, a system of equitable cost recovery 
for industrial users was established along with a user charge for the non-industrial 
users. 



58 



G.L.R.V.T.H.S. 



INTRODUCTION 

Fiscal year 1975 was a year of stability for this school compared to the past 
few years of construction and rapid growth. 

The last remaining major construction project of the new building, the conver- 
sion of 12,000 square feet of bus shelter space to shop facilities, was completed 
and the day school enrollment reached 2,013 students as of October 1, 1974. 

No major changes in curriculum, staff, or administration took place during the 
school year. In most instances the year could be characterized as a period when 
instructional and administrative systems were consolidated and improved after a 
period of construction and growth. 

Late in the school year Mr. James A. Booth, Superintendent Director, announced 
plans to retire as of August 31, 1975. Mr. Booth has been Superintendent Director 
since the school opened and has directed the organization and growth of the insti- 
tution with diligence and acclaim. 

As of September 1, 1975, Mr. Louis E. Gleason, an Assistant-Director under Mr. 
Booth, began the duties as the new Superintendent-Director. The transition period 
has been accomplished smoothly with all policies and systems developed over the 
years being kept in effect. 



REGULAR DAY SCHOOL 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1975 



GRADE 
MUNICIPALITY 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




14 


PG. 


PG. 


SPECIAL 
NEEDS 


TOTAL 


ANDOVER 


33 


26 


23 


13 


9 




9 





1 


7 


121 


LAWRENCE 


336 


313 


278 


199 


32 




38 


23 


4 


12 


1,235 


METHUEN 


144 


134 


127 


84 


22 




22 


12 


2 


7 


554 


NORTH ANDOVER 


30 


14 


18 


15 


6 




11 


8 


1 





103 


TOTALS 


543 


487 


446 


311 


69 




80 


43 


8 


26 


2,013 








GRADUATES 


JUNE, 


1975 












NUMBER 
GRADUATED 


NUMBER 
PLACED 


AVERAGE 
SALARY 


ARMED 
SERVICES 


HIGHER 
EDUCATION 


GRADE 12 


298 




272 




3. 


27 




20 




6 




GRADE 13 


37 




37 




3. 


27 














GRADE 14 


17 




17 




3. 


27 














POST GRADUATE 


24 




24 




3. 


27 














L.P.N. 


59 




30 




3. 


38 














TOTALS 


435 




380 










20 




6 





59 



PUPIL SEPARATIONS JUNE, 1975 



GRADE 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


PGI 


TOTAL 


TRANSFER 


47 


52 


13 


5 








1 


118 


EMPLOYMENT 








10 


5 


7 


6 


4 


32 


ARMED SERVICES 








2 














2 


MOVED OUT-OF-STATE 


5 
52 


2 
54 


3 
28 



10 




7 



6 



5 


10 


TOTALS 


162 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

The school maintains a Cooperative Program for students during the student's 
Senior year in school. Under this program students who meet academic and vocation- 
al standards are given the opportunity to work in commerce and industry within 
their chosen vocational area. 

One of the principal purposes of this program is to enhance the student's know- 
ledge within a chosen field, and acclimate the student to actual commercial and in- 
dustrial standards of performance. 

Senior students are scheduled in such a manner that an employer participating 
in the Cooperative Program has a student employee each working week. 

Currently, the school has Cooperative Program agreements with over 500 compan- 
ies. There are Cooperative work opportunities in every vocational discipline 
taught at the secondary level. During the past year, 272 senior students were en- 
gaged in the Cooperative Program. This accounted for 90% of the seniors working in 
a year when the economic work picture was very bleak. These 272 seniors with an 
average wage of $3.27/hr. collectively earned more than $1,000,000 in this year. 
The bulk of this $1,000,000 would be spent in the Greater Lawrence Community. 

EVENING SCHOOL 

Evening School enrollment continued at the rate that has been maintained over 
the past several years. Approximately 2,469 students registered and attended the 
Evening School Division in 1974. 

Students attending the Evening Division must meet certain requirements to en- 
ter specific programs. Listed below are the courses, categories and their require- 
ments. 



EVENING SCHOOL PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES - 1974 

City or Town 

Lawrence 

Methuen 

North Andover 

Andover 

Massachusetts Non-Resident 

New Hampshire 

TOTAL 1,452 1,017 



Male 


Female 


646 


510 


389 


247 


89 


78 


166 


155 


144 


25 


18 


2 



60 



EVENING SCHOOL PARTICIPATION BY CATEGORIES - 1974 



Course 



Trade Extension 

Preparatory 

Evening Practical Arts 

Novice 

Apprentice 
TOTAL 



Male 


Female 


389 


29 


659 


349 


193 


519 


99 


120 


112 






1,452 



1,017 



Persons meeting the requirements of one of the following categories will be eligible 
to enter a class. 

Trade Extension courses are offered to persons at least sixteen 
years of age and the course they wish to take must be related 
to their full-time employment. 

The Apprentice courses offered are available to those in- 
dentured persons who have entered into a written agreement 
with an employer, or association, or organization of employees. 

The Preparatory programs are short intensive courses for persons 
over sixteen years of age, who are employed or unemployed. 
Courses taken must not be related to their full-time employment. 

Evening Practical Arts courses are open to all adults in the 
area who are interested in the courses offered for their own 
personal satisfaction. 



COURSES OFFERED 



Trade Extension - 150 hrs . 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Autobody 

Autobody (Frame & Straightening) 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts 

Drafting 

Electrical Code 

Electricity 

Food Service Supervisor Training 



Preparatory - 75 hrs 



Automotive 

Carpentry 

Commercial Art 

Culinary Art 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Key Punch 

Machine Shop 

Major Appliance Repair 



Machine Shop 

Machining 

Numberical Control 
Metal Fabrication 

Sheet Metal Fabrication & Layout 
Shop Math and Blue Print 
Plumbing 
Welding 

Radio & T.V. Repair 
Steam Engineering (1st class 
fireman, 2nd & 3rd class Eng.) 



Marketing, Sales Promotion & 

Advertising 
Metal Fabrication & Layout 
Photography I and II 
Radio & T.V. Repair 
Small Engine Repair 
Steam Engineering (2nd class 

fireman) 150 hours 
Typing (basic) 
Upholstery 
Welding 



61 



Evening Practical Arts - 60 hrs 

Automotive 
Clothing I and II 
Culinary Arts 

Cake Decorating 

Nutrition and Party Cuisine 
Interior Decorating 
Home Maintenance 

SUMMER SCHOOL - 1974 



Culinary Arts 

Cooking with Wine 

Gourmet Foods 

Bar-B-Que 
Furniture Refinishing 
Upholstery 
Woodworking 



The 1974 Summer Session was the largest in the history of the school 
with a total enrollment of 701 students. 

In general, classes were held in both academic and vocational courses. 

The Career Development-Exploratory Program, while open to all students, is pri- 
marily designed to acquaint pre-high school students with the many opportunities for 
career study and training available at the school. 

Students in the Career Development program enroll in specific vocational courses 
which may last from two to three weeks out of the six week session. 

The students, however, are relatively free to change courses as the program 
progresses and seek knowledge and experience in three to four career areas which 
may be of future interest and value to the individual pupil. 



Career Development-Exploratory clusters are listed below 



Chef Training 
Baking 



Drafting 

Metal Fabrication 

Machine Shop 



Automotive 
Autobody 



Electricity 
Electronics 
Major Appliance Repair 



Upholstery 

Painting & Decorating 



Commercial Art. 
Distributive Ed 
Media/Photo 



Dressmaking 

Hair Design & Styling 



Small Engines 
Carpentry 



Courses for older students are designated as Regular Summer School to differ- 
entiate these Career Development-Exploratory sections. Regular Summer School 
students may spend four hours per day for six school weeks actively engaged in shop 
vocational training. The same vocational disciplines open to Career Development- 
Exploratory students are open to Summer School students. Although minimum age 
requirements are maintained, there is no maximum age limitation. For this reason it 
is not uncommon for college students and adults to take Regular Summer School courses 
both for enrichment and acquisition of new skills. 

The academic Summer School curriculum is designated to provide both remedial 
assistance in reading, English, and mathematics and advanced study in algebra, ge- 
ometry and trigonometry. Remedial reading classes are scheduled with low pupil- 
teacher ratios so that maximum individual attention may be given to students with 
serious reading handicaps. Other academic courses are scheduled with full class 
complements. Further, many students enrolled in this program take a combination of 
both academic and vocational courses which develops a well rounded summer program of 
both study and skill acquisition. 



62 



The Summer School Program made use of the school's new pool facility. Younger 
students were scheduled for the pool two or three hours per week. Following a brief 
testing period, swimmers were divided into two groups: swimmers and non-swimmers. 
Swimmers received instructions in water survival and correct techniques in various 
swimming strokes. The main emphasis with the non-swimmers centered on reducing fear 
of the water and taking the initial steps toward swimming competence. It is esti- 
mated that thirty or forty youngsters originally classified as non-swimmers were 
able to navigate the width of the pool by summer's end. 

A total of thirty-two faculty members participated in the Summer School Program, 
Teaching assignments were divided in some areas so that in reality the total of full 
time instructors numbered twenty-eight. In addition to instructors, a school nurse 
was on duty during school hours to provide emergency attention when necessary. 
Supervision of the Summer Program is carried on by school administrators as part of 
their regular duties. 

ENROLLMENT STATISTICS - SUMMER SCHOOL 1974 



Andover 


75 


Lawrence 


369 


Methuen 


149 


North Andover 


108 


TOTAL 


701 



INDUSTRIAL ENTRY - CAREER EXPLORATORY 

The Industrial Entry-Career Exploratory Program experienced a 42% increase in 
student enrollments for school year 1974-1975. Last year's student enrollment of 
340 has increased to a record high of 417 students for this year's session. 

The Industrial Entry-Career Development program runs two afternoons per week 
between the hours of 3:15 P.M. to 5:15 P.M. Students from both high school and 
Junior high schools are enrolled in the program. Older students may select a voca- 
tional discipline and specialize in that area for the full thirty-seven sessions 
which the course meets. Younger students tend to select a number of vocationsl areas 
seeking training and experience upon which future career choices may be made. 

In the past, a Career Cluster of courses with each discipline closely related 
to other courses in the cluster was used as the general format. This year courses 
in each cluster have been arranged so that a wider variety of career possibilities 
exist in each cluster. Listed below are the vocational disciplines in each career 
cluster . 

Although students start the program by selecting one of the four clusters, it 
is not impossible for changes to be made in individual schedules allowing students 
to select courses from each of the four clusters. 



CLUSTER #1 



CLUSTER #2 



Automotive 

Autobody 

Metal Fabrication 

Machine Shop 

Small Engines 



Carpentry 

Major Appliance Repair 

Plumbing 

Culinary Arts 



Cluster #3 

Electrical 

Radio & T.V. Repair 

Commercial Art 

Electronics 



Cluster #4 

Clothing 

Upholstery 

Drafting 

Distributive Education 

Photography 

Beauty & Charm 



63 



31 


134 


8 4 


24 



14 


45 


87 


221 


23 


107 


20 


44 



INDUSTRIAL ENTRY DATA 
1974 - 1975 

PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES 

Boys Girls TOTAL 

Andover 

Lawrence 

Methuen 

North Andover 

TOTAL 273 144 417 

AREA VOCATIONAL COORDINATOR 

In February of 1975, the position of Area Coordinator of Occupational Educa- 
tion was funded under P.L. 90-576. Mr. Leo Millea, formerly on the teaching staff 
of Fitchburg State College, was appointed to the new position. 

The Area Coordinator of Occupational Education is responsible for facilitating 
the expansion of occupational education programs to the youth of the Region. This 
is accomplished through direct contact with the Superintendents, Principals, Guid- 
ance Personnel, and Department Chairmen within the four regional school systems. 

During the past nine months, Mr. Millea has met with many area educators and 
established the framework upon which expansion of occupational education is expected 
to grow. In the months ahead, Mr. Millea will become more involved in funding pro- 
posals, working closely with the area schools in such areas as career awareness, 
special education, educational collaboratives , and program evaluation. 

TITLE VII MEALS FOR THE ELDERLY 

During the period 1 July 1974 - 30 June 1975, the Merrimack Valley Title VII 
project served a total of 154,239 meals to the elderly. Of these 137,370 meals were 
served at ten congregated sites and 16,869 were home delivered to shut-ins. The 
nutrition services were provided to 2,330 elderly participants during the period of 
this report . 

In addition to meals, supportive services were provided to participants through- 
out the project area. Nearly 10,000 units of supportive service were provided for 
the elderly during the year. These services included transportation, shopping 
assistance, escort service, health counseling, recreation, information and referral 
and nutrition education.' 

MASSACHUSETTS ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The school acts as fiscal agent for the council and receives 1-1 1/2% of their 
gross grant for this service. The money received is used to reduce the assessment 
to the communities under funds for reduction. 

MASSACHUSETTS VOCATIONAL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

This is a new account for which the school will act as fiscal agent. The money 
received is used to reduce the assessment to the communities under funds for reduc- 
tion . 

GREATER LAWRENCE COLLABORATIVE FOR SPECIAL NEEDS 

The school acts as the fiscal agent for the Collaborative. The Collaborative 
is made up of the public school systems of Andover, Greater Lawrence Regional Voca- 
tional Technical High School, Lawrence, Methuen, and North Andover. This is performed 
as a regional community action without a fiscal compensation. 

64 



H 
PS 
O 
ft 

w 

PS 

W 
C3 



CQ 




O 

s 

C3 
iH 
C3 

PQ 

bd 
3 

•H 

3 



01 
0) 
Sn 
3 
+J 
•H 
T3 
3 

a; 
a 



4-> 


TJ 
CQ 

T3 



CO 
3 
■n 

<: 




<H 

co 
3 

Ctf 



-a 



+-> 
o 

-a 

3 

CQ 



I I I I I I I 

o o o o o o o 
I I I I I I I 



CD 
CM 



t> 



CO 



CO 
CM 



oo 



CO 



co 
o 

rH 



CM 

CD 
CO 

CM 



LO 



eg 

CO 
CO 

CM 



CO 



lO 
CO 

CO 

o 

CM 



t> 

m 

r-i 

in 

o 
m 



i i 

o o 
i i 



t> 


m 


<D 


■* 


oo 


co 


t> 


CM 


CD 


o 


CD 


"tf 


m 


m 


CO 


■* 


CD 


CM 


CM 


00 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO 


<d 


CO 


00 


CD 


o 


O 


o 


o 


CM 


m 


CD 


CM 


CO 


oo 


m 


r-i 


CD 


00 


CM 


m 


r-i 


^* 


CM 


00 


CM 


CO 


r-i 


CD 


l> 


cd 


rH 



<d 
m 



<d 
o 

CM 



CM 



O 
CM 



CM 



oo 

CM 



m 



co en 

CD CM 
■* CM 



<d 
m 



co 

CO 

co 

co 

CD 
O 
CM 



co 

CO 
CM 

CM 



co 

CD 

o 
in 
co 

o 

CM 



CM 



co 

CD 

m 
o 
m 

co 
co 



cd 

co 



co 

CM 



CD 



CO 



cd 

CD 

cd 
oo 



oo 
o 

co 
h 

CM 



CO 



(D 

CO 

■"# 

CO 



CM 



o 
m 

CD 



CD 



m 

CM 



CD 
CM 

CO 

CM 



CM 



CM 



CO 



o 
o 
o 

CM 



o o 

CO CM 
l> <D 



t^ 


in 


r-i 


CO 


oo 


00 


CO 


l> 


CD 


o 


■* 


<* 


■* 


r-i 


■* 


CD 


o 


O 


CO 


o 


o 


■>* 


<D 


■* 


CD 


CD 


rH 


oo 


o 


o 


"* 


oo 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


O 


I-l 


rH 


oo 


CM 


o 


CO 


l> 


m 


oo 


■* 


CM 


CO 


i> 


o 



CD 



* 
r-i 

m 

r-i 

m 

o 
m 



co 

CM 



<tf 



o 
o 

CO 
CO 
CO 



r-i 

CO 



I 

o 
I 



oo 

CO 

co 



H 

CO 




























3 




a 












O 






O 

















•H 






•H 




•H 




-p 








> 






-(-> 




+-> 




3 








u 






O 


co 


05 


+-> 


as 















3 





-P 


3 


rH 








CO 






U 


•H 


H 


a 


0< 








\ 




rH 


-P 


O 


O 


r-i 




CQ 






+-> 







CO 


a 


Q< 


Ph 


<H 









3 




u 


3 





CO 







50 


CO 









+-> 


h 


bfi 


3 


m 




H 


3 




a 




c 




<s 


OS 


o 





2 


o 












=H 




5h 




o 







Jh 




o 


o 


>> 


H 


3 


3 


a 


3 




•H 


CO 






u 




O 


a$ 




as 




+J 


J 


1— 1 





a 


<H 


■H 


3 


i-i 


rH 







<; 


a 


CO 


■ri 





+-> 





as 


rH 


>> 


PS 


H 


u 


a 


r- 1 




C3 


+-> 


•H 





as 




o 








•H 


4-> 


H 


3 


O 





H 


+-> 


H 


c 


a. 


X 


CO 





•H 





CO 


+-> 


12 







;*: 


3 


o 


Q< 


as 


ft 


•H 


3 







o 


w 


< 


o 


O 


§ 


CO 


s 


o 


Q 





■u 


CUD 
T3 
3 
PQ 

CO T3 
O 3 

3 

o o 

+3 3 


3 &J0 
O 3 



OS 3 
O 
3 CJ 

o 

H CD 

O r-i 

<hi 

H 
CO OS 



u 

co 

•H 

T3 In 



O 





o -h tj: 

CHC 
OS ft-H 

ih 0,-0 

05 OS OS 

03 

O 3 
bOO 

3 O H 

■H - 
T3 O XJ 
3 m 3 

w m- 3 



65 



APPROVED FINAL BUDGET 



July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975 

General Control 108 , 118 

Expense of Instruction: Day School $2,263,261 

Evening School .... 143 , 090 

Total Expense of Instruction 2,406,351 

Auxiliary Agencies , 178, 999 

Cost of Transportation 213 , 408 

Operation of Plant 348,449 

Maintenance of Plant 191,950 

Special Charges 142,329 

Miscellaneous 76, 124 

Outlay , 24,000 

Debt Retirement and Service 621 , 940 



GRAND TOTAL 
Funds for Reduction: 



$4,311,668 



School Building Assistance Bureau 323,300 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 164,160 

P. L. 90-576 169,203 

P. L. 81-874 11,914 

Chapter 791 1 , 068 , 000 

Other Funds 75,849 



Total Funds for Reduction 
NET TOTAL 

BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



$1,812,426 
$2,499,242 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 



Total Payment 

143,595.04 

1,565,642.08 

680,869.90 

109,134.98 



Three Payments 

35,898.76 
391,410.52 
170,217.47 

27,283.74 



One Payment 

35,898,76 
391,410.52 
170,217.49 

27,283.76 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
July 8, 1975 
FY 75 Ending Balances 



School Funds: 



NET CASH POSITION 



Athletic . . . 
Cafeteria . . . 
Construction 
Work Study . . 
General Fund 

Totals 



1,278.34 

806.09 

38,861.16 

946.47 

724,524.38* 

$766,416.44 



66 



:federal PROGRAMS FISCAL CUSTODIAN OF FUNDS: 

P.L. 90-576 Special Account 109,083.05 

ICEDIS 30,636.83 

| Mass . Advisory Council 50,892 .21 

Title VII, Meals ft) r the Elderly 52,875.78 

Greater Lawrence Special Needs (Collaborative) 5,541.14 

MDTA 523 . 45 

Mass . Vocational Student Organization 000.00 

TOTALS $ 249,552.46 

GRAND TOTAL $ 1,015,968.90** 

* This $724,524.38 balance represents that portion of the $2,874,138 
"Funds for Reduction for FY 76" received to date. This leaves an 
outstanding balance of over (2) two million dollars. This balance 
is outstanding from anticipated state and federal funding. 

** Includes $700,000 in Certificates of Deposit: 
$200,000 @ 6.02% to mature 7/14/75 
$300,000 @ 5.77% to mature 7/20/75 
$200,000 @ 5.58% to mature 8/11/75 



APPROVED BUDGET 

July 1, 1975 - June 30, 1976 

General Control 130,982 

Expense of Instruction: Day School 2,540,165 

Evening School... 145,514 

Total Expense of Instruction 2,685,679 

Auxiliary Agencies 177,330 

Cost of Transportation 230, 481 

Operation of Plant 485, 401 

Maintenance of Plant 234, 097 

Special Charges 148 , 556 

Miscellaneous 64, 572 

Outlay 76, 479 

Debt Retirement and Service 578 , 740 

GRAND TOTAL $4,812,317 

Funds for Reduction 

School Building Assistance Bureau 276,919 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 108,838 

P. L. 90-576 33,053 

P. L. 81-874 5,202 

Chapter 791 1,673,098 

Other Funds 166, 484 

Equipment Replacement Fund 33 , 077 

FY 75 Contingency Account 50,000 

* Chapter 71 Section 16 D 527, 467 



TOTAL Funds for Reduction $2,874,138 

NET TOTAL $1,938,179 



67 



BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



Total 
Payment 



1 Aug. 75 
Payment 



Andover 124,595.70 39,626.64 

Lawrence 1,176,848.52 294,212.13 

Methuen 534,951.62 170,134.45 

North Andover 101,783.16 25,445.79 



"1 Dec. 75/1 Apr. 76 
Each Payment 

28,323.02 
294,212.13 
121,605.73 

25,445.79 



* Revised August 14, 1975 per Regional School District Aid 
under the Provisions of Chapter 71 Section 16 D as amended. 



1 June 76 
Payment 

28,323.02 
294,212.13 
121,605.71 

25,445.79 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 



Under the terms of her will, the late Mrs. Margaret G. Towle, long-time resi- 
dent of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be 
held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 
Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this 
fund "be devoted to the assistance or the procurement of assistance for worthy per- 
sons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or support 
on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The fund is administered by a group of three trustees, chosen by the Town Mana- 
ger with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from 
the fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle' s will. The cases are referred 
to the trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and in- 
terested individuals. 

During the eighteen-month period, the trustees acted on 36 cases, disbursing 
$36,776.38 on approved cases which numbered 33. Only the income of the fund is 
available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current 
income is invested under the direction of the trustees. All disbursements are made 
by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the trustees. 



Balance of Income - July 1, 1974 
1974 - 1975 Receipts 



1974 - 1975 Disbursements 

Balance of Income - December 31, 1975 



$ 76,640.39 

44,248.08 
$120,888.47 

36,776.38 
$ 84,112.09 



Invested 
Checking Acct . 



$73,304.47 

10,807.62 

$84,112.09 



Sale of Property 



During the past 18-month period the following sales of property were made 



Scrap iron 

Fire trucks 

Used wheels 

Miscellaneous desks, chairs, etc. 



68 



$ 297,45 

1,961,99 

1,700,00 

126,44 

$4,085,88 



Animal Inspection 



During the period of July 1, 1974 to December 31, 1975, there were 62 dogs 
quarantined and examined for signs of rabies. 

Also, the following animal inspections were made: 

Dairy Herds (calves to 1 year) 5 

Dairy Cows and Heifers (2 years old and older... 24 

Dairy Heifers (1-2 years of age) 11 

Bulls 1 

Beef Cattle 17 

Oxen 

Horses 99 

Ponies 43 

Goats 

Sheep 3 

Swine 1 , 306 



Engineering 



Field surveys, construction plans and specifications, bids taken, field lay- 
out and on-site inspections were provided for the following list of projects: 

1. Reconstruction of portions of High Plain Road and Cross Street, 
5,100 feet in length, at a cost of $140,000. 

2. Surface water drainage lines totaling 5,200 lineal feet under two major 
contracts in the William St. and Stratford Road areas and several other less 
extensive systems elsewhere at a cost of $80,200. 

3. 630 lineal feet of water main were added in High Street, Ballardvale 
at a cost of $8,640. 

4 a Bids were taken for fence work at the Shawsheen School, on Stevens St. and 
at the High School. Also bids were received for guard rail repairs and 
cement concrete sidewalk replacement. These projects totalled $20,850. 

5. Bridge repairs were made on the parapet walls of the Stevens St. and Central 
St. bridges over the Shawsheen River; Bituminous Concrete sidewalk was in- 
stalled on Haverhill St.; and four sets of School Zone Lights completed. 
These projects totalled $24,080. 

6. Bids have been taken for drainage work on Haverhill Street near Stirling 
with work scheduled to start in April at a cost of $60,800. 

Work completed valued at $265,000. 

Planning Board 

Preliminary and definitive plans for six subdivisions of land with a total 
of 102 lots were reviewed for the Planning Board to determine conformance with 
its rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. 
Problem areas in subdivisions under construction were reviewed with the Construc- 
tion Inspector. Legal descriptions for easements and roadway layouts were checked 
before filing in the Registry of Deeds. 

69 



Miscellaneous 

1. Easement and betterment plans were prepared where applicable for the projects 
outlined above. 

2. Many plans, drawings and sketches were prepared for the Selectmen, Town 
Manager and the various Town Departments and Boards. 

3. Many Town citizens were assisted in obtaining information about existing Town 
utilities, street layouts and other general information, 

4. This division assisted in providing street opening permits for underground 
utilities. 

5. The Town was represented in all engineering matters with the County and State 
governments, principally concerning Chapter 90 reconstruction and County 
layouts . 

6. The engineering records of the Town were maintained and other Town departments 
were aided in obtaining such information. 

The Engineering Division consists of two full-time employees with three 
students employed part-time during the summer months. Three CETA employees 
started in late February of 1975 forming a survey party, and one draftsman was 
added in April. With this added help the field work was completed for approx- 
imately 30 drainage problem areas, the proposed improvement to River Road just 
west of Route 93 and the construction field work for the reconstruction of a 
portion of High Plain Road and Cross Street. 



Water Department 



The water division of the Department of Public Works consists of seventeen 
(17) full-time employees including the Superintendent. The division is responsible 
for the supply, treatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The 
major components of the water system are as follows: 

Supply: Haggetts Pond 
Fish Brook 
Merrimack River 
Abbott Well 

Treatment : 

Water Filtration Plant 

Chlorin a t ion Facilities - Fish Brook 

Treatment Facilities - Abbott Well 

Pumping Stations: 

Water Treatment Plant 
Fish Brook 
Bancroft Road 

Distribution System: 

Storage Reservoirs 

Bancroft Road 
Prospect Hill 
Wood Hill 

Distribution pipes - 160 miles 

The Water Filtration Plant at Haggetts Pond was officially dedicated on 
October 25, 1974 and an open house was held on October 26 and October 27, 1974. 

70 



The facilities were viewed by over 1,500 interested citizens. Since then 

the staff has conducted numerous tours for students in all grades of the Andover 

School system, colleges throughout New England, various local clubs, and visitors 
from all over the world. 

The total water pumped to the system from July 1, 1974 thru December 31, 
1975 was 1,926,977,000 gallons. In the last six months of 1974 and the year 1975 
a total of 272,724,000 gallons of water was pumped into Haggetts Pond from Fish 
Brook, and also 223,427,000 gallons from the Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond. 
The average daily pumping was 3,523,000 gallons, with a maximum day of 8,117,000 
gallons occurring on July 6, 1975. 

Water Services 



Taps for water mains made 
Taps for water services made 



8 
- 35 



Leaks 



House service leaks repaired 
Water main breaks repaired 



51 
19 



Hydrants 



Hydrants repaired or replaced 
New hydrants installed 



45 
28 



Water Meters 



New water meters installed 
Old meters replaced 
Water meters repaired 
Field meters serviced 

(Spring & Fall) 



- 165 

69 

- 170 

41 



1,311 telephone calls were recorded for turning water on or off, curb and gate 
boxes repaired, location of services, meter leaks, etc. 

Additions to the water system by the acceptance of streets: 



Athena Circle 
Delphi Circle 
Olympia Way 
Korinthian Way 
Bridle Path Road 
Tallyho Lane 
Whiffletree Circle 
Ivanhoe Lane 
Cardinal Lane 
Paulornette Circle 
Eagle Way 
Farrwood Drive 
Mohawk Road 
Agawam Lane 
Penobscot Way 



315 feet of 6" 
487 feet of 6" 
627 feet of 8" 

2,370 feet of 8" 
404 feet of 6" 
500 feet of 6" 
580 feet of 8" 
530 feet of 6" 

1,060 feet of 8" 
580 feet of 6" 
290 feet of 6" 

3,839 feet of 8" 

1,580 feet of 8" 
feet of 6" 



C.L.C. I .Pipe 



473 

532 feet of 



In December 1974 the Improvements to the Water Distribution system in the 
Stevens Street, Sutherland and Stirling Streets and Shawsheen Heights section of 
town was completed by Peter Arakelian & Son, Inc. Also the painting of Prospect 
Hill reservoir and Wood Hill reservoir was completed by Roger Payeur. The CETA 
program personnel helped in painting all water pumping facilities and painting 
and renovations to the water department facilities on Lewis Street. 

In March 1975 the bids for the 1974 Water Main Improvements in the Rattle- 
snake, Boston, County and Gould Road area and a portion of Salem Street were 



71 



opened and the contract awarded to P. Cavalieri & Sons, I n c. of North Attleboro, 
Massachusetts, with work completed in November of 1975. Also in September 1975 
a new 6" water main was installed in High Street, Ballardvale by James Bateson,Jr. 
The rebuilding of the Abbott Well pump was completed by Maher Pump from North 
Reading in the early part of 1975. The design and survey of the proposed 1975 
Water Improvements is in progress with completion scheduled in February 1976. 

For the last six months of 1974 the division received $493.00 for special 
services and for the 12 months of 1975, $595.94, for a total of $1,088.94. Also, 
2,518,760 gallons of water was sold to North Reading on an emergency basis for 
the sum of $8,861.34. 

Dennis Paquette has assumed the duties of Chemist/Assistant Chief Operator 
replacing John Sakelaris who terminated his services with the town in April 1975. 

In April 1975 the Water Division was saddened by the death of John Campbell, 
a faithful employee for the town since October 1954. He was a conscientious 
worker, well versed in the various facets of the work involved in the department 
and well liked by his superiors, fellow workmen and the townspeople with whom he 
came in contact. 



Sewers 

The sewer division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for the 
operation and maintenance of the wastewater treatment facility off Dale Street in 
Ballardvale and the wastewater pumping station located on Riverina Road in Shaw- 
sheen Village. 

The sewerage system includes sixty-one (61) miles of sanitary sewers and 
3,550 connections. The Ballardvale plant is a secondary treatment plant and the 
effluent is discharged into the Shawsheen River. The Riverina Road pumping 
station discharges by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the 
Merrimack River. The raw sewage discharge from Riverina Road will be collected 
by the Greater Lawrence Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant which is scheduled to 
go on line by January 1977. 

Sewerage system changes to allow for the abandonment of the Ballardvale 
treatment plant were completed and advertised for bids with the contract awarded 
to T. J. Kiley, Inc. of Lynn, Mass., on December 18, 1975, with completion of the 
contract scheduled for June 1976. This will eliminate all wastewater discharges 
into the Shawsheen River from Andover . 

In the later part of 1974 the #2 pump at Riverina Road pumping station was 
overhauled and work completed in January 1975. 

The West Andover Sewer contract was awarded to J. F. White Construction Co. 
of Newton, Mass. Construction started in August 1975 and by December 1975, 41.5 
per cent of the contract had been completed. This project is scheduled to be 
completed in 1976. 

In the past year and a half the division rodded and freed blockages in 
40 sewer main locations, and approximately 125 calls for assistance from home 
owners with private sewer service problems were answered. 

The sewer maintenance program continues to show increasingly good results, 
with weekly and monthly inspections of certain sections of sewers that because of 
relatively flat slopes and low velocity cause plugging problems. 

The sewer division received $1,008.94 for special services performed during 
the past year and a half. 



72 



Highways 



During the period July 1, 1974 through December 31, 1975 some 46 miles of 
roads were treated with MC3 asphalt and sand and then honed. The following streets 
were resurfaced by the above method: 



Abbot Street 
Alden Road 
Andover Street 
Argilla Road 
Bailey Road 
Bancroft Road 
Bartlet Street 
Bellevue Road 
Blood Road 
Boutwell Road 
Bowdoin Street 
Brundrett Avenue 
Buxton Court 
Carlisle Street 
Carmel Road 
Cassimere Street 
Chandler Circle 
Chester Street 
Chestnut Street 
Cornell Road 
Cross Street 
Cutler Road 
Dartmouth Road 
Deerberry Lane 
Dufton Road 
Dumbarton Street 
Dwight Street 
Elm Street 
Fiske Street 
Fleming Avenue 
Flint Circle 
Forrest Hill Drive 
Foster Circle 
Fox Hill Road 
Gardner Avenue 
George Street 
Greenwood Road 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Hall Avenue 
Harold Parker Road 
Harvard Road 



High Street (B'vale) 
High Street 
Highland Road 
Holmes Road 
Holt Road 
Howell Drive 
Kenilworth Street 
Lewis Street 
Lincoln Circle 
Linwood Street 
Marilyn Road 
Mary Lou Lane 
Oak Street 
Orchard Street 
Phillips Street 
Porter Road 
Princeton Avenue 
Rennie Drive 
River Street 
Rolling Ridge Road 
School Street 
Sherry Drive 
Shirley Road 
Spring Grove Road 
Stinson Road 
Stirling Street 
Strawberry Hill Road 
Summer Street 
Suncrest Road 
Sutherland Street 
Tessier Drive 
Tewksbury Street 
Theodore Avenue 
Torr Street 
Upland Road 
Virginia Road 
Whittier Street 
Wintergreen Circle 
Woburn Street 
Woodland Road 
Yale Road 



99,091 gallons of asphalt (MC3), at a cost of $52,000.80, and 4726.83 tons of 
sand and gravel, at a cost of $13,473.96, were used, making a total of $65,474.76 
for road materials. 

The following streets were resurfaced with a layer of Type I Bituminous 
Concrete: Haverhill Street, High Plain Road, and Russett Lane. 1191 tons of 
bituminous concrete were utilized at a cost of $21,438.00. 

Clean Up : 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers were kept busy cleaning the streets 
after the winter sanding. This past fall two leaf pickers were used to remove 
leaves from the Town streets; the leaves were taken to the Essex Gravel Pit for 



73 



composting. Pick-up of leaves is a three-month project because of the no-burning 
law. 

Inspection : 

The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division on its inspection of 
the conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed. 



ti 



Bridges : 

Bridges under control of the Highway Division (e.g., Stevens Street, Andover 
Street and Central Street) were inspected during the year. A new chain link fence 
was installed at the Stevens Street bridge and the sidewalk was replaced. Metal 
guard rails were painted where required. Chain link fences were replaced at 
Morton Street. 

Sidewalks : 

Sidewalks were replaced with Bituminous Concrete at the following locations 
Brechin Terrace, sections of Park Street, Canterbury Street, Central Street and 
Main Street. Concrete sidewalks were replaced on Main Street and North Main Street J 

Storm Drains : 

Storm drains, brooks and catch basins were cleaned, and 53 basins were 
repaired . 

Snow and Ice Control : 

The Highway Division is responsible for snow removal and ice control on all 
Town roads. The snow fall was as follows: 

1974 

December 9 inches 

1975 

January 9 inches 

February 19 inches 

March 3.5 inches 

December 32 inches 

Among the staff changes was the appointment of John M. Lynch to Superintendent 
of Highways and Parks. This resulted from the untimely death of Stanley Chlebowski, 
which saddened the community. John M. Lynch was former Highway Foreman. George 
Douty was appointed to the position of Highway Foreman. All promotions were ef- 
fected from within the department. 

Alfred F. Zawojek, another Highway Division employee, also passed away during 
this period. Although he had been with the department for only a few years, he 
also is greatly missed. 

Calvin Metcalf and Jim Floyd have been added to the rolls of the retired and 
we wish them many happy years. 



Parks 



The Park Division during the early spring repairs and paints the benches, port- 
able bleachers and back stops for all the baseball diamonds at the High School 
and the Little League Fields. 

74 






With the cooperation of the School's Athletic Director, the varsity soccer 
ifield has been taken out of service for a year allowing adequate time to rebuild 
ithe field and establish a new growth. 

Three High School and ten Little League fields were raked, rolled and marked 
If or each game. The running tracks and soccer fields are prepared for all the 
Ischool meets. 

Portable bleachers are erected at the High School, Little League and Junior 
League baseball fields and for the Pee-Wee Football league. 

Fertilizer and seed, as needed, were applied in the spring and fall on all 
Town grassed areas, and over 65 acres of grass areas were cut each week during the 
growing season. 

Spraying was done, where required, to control infestation of Japanese beetles. 

This year, 26 town grass plot areas were mowed by private contractors during 
the growing season. 

In the fall, all necessary equipment is erected at the four school football 
fields and these fields are cleaned and marked for each game. 

The Park personnel return to the Highway Division during the winter season for 
maintenance of highways and sidewalks and snow and ice control. 



Forestry 

Spraying : 

In order to protect Town trees and comply with State requirements for Insect 
Pest Control and Dutch Elm Disease Control, the Forestry Division sprayed selected 
trees using pesticides and methods approved by State and Federal authorities. The 
spray program also included the summer inspection for diseased trees and insect in- 
festations and winter inspections for signs of Gypsy Moth build-up. Although signs 
of Gypsy Moth infestation have not been seen in Andover for many years, the sur- 
veillance will continue in order to permit the division ample time to plan and pre- 
pare for a timely spray project if needed. Poison Ivy and some selected roadside 
vegetation was sprayed with a liquid herbicide. The Spring of 1975 saw the start 
of a project to treat guard rails, hydrants, and other selected areas with a granu- 
lar herbicide that controls vegetation in these areas without affecting adjacent 
vegetation. 

Planting : 

The Forestry Division continued its effort to plant replacement trees where 
space allowed. Primarily during the spring of 1975, the division planted 67 shade 
and ornamental trees and 860 seedlings. Most of the seedlings were planted in the 
division's small nursery, but 50 White Flowering Dogwoods were planted on town 
property well set back from the roadway. The following are the other varieties of 
trees planted: Sugar Maple, Norway Maple, Golden Chaintree, Flowering Crabapple, 
White Pine, Red Pine, Ginko, American Elm, Black Walnut, Scotch Pine, Callery Pear, 
and Honey Locust . 

The Spade and Trowel Garden Club donated two Flowering Crabapples and one Cal- 
lery Pear which the division planted at the Water Filtration Plant. 

The Andover Garden Club donated three Ginko trees which the division planted 
in the Municipal Parking Lot. 

A sizable Norway Maple from the town nursery was the division's 1975 Arbor Day 
planting in the small grass plot behind the Town Hall; this replaced an old Sugar 

75 



Maple which had been dying back and heavily pruned over the past several years. 

A sizable American Elm growing in a field owned by Phillips Academy was donated 
to the town; it was dug up by the Forestry Division and planted on Main Street in 
front of the Andover Historical Society. 

Although several in-town areas are losing their older trees, replacement plant- 
ings in most of these areas are not possible due to a lack of space, underground 
obstructions, and above-ground utility wires. When the division clears roadside 
areas of plant debris, it leaves those small trees which have the potential of 
becoming handsome street trees. 

Removals : 

During the 18-month period the division removed 312 dead, dying and dangerous 
trees. These trees range in size from 10" in diameter up to more than 30" in di- 
ameter. They were located in the residential areas, country road areas, and the in- 
town areas. Whenever possible, the division pruned diseased, decayed, or dangerous 
portions of trees in order to avoid removing them. 

Pruning : 

During this period, the Forestry Division spent 25 per cent of its time pruning 
Pruning consisted of street-by-street pruning, individual problem-tree pruning, flat 
clearing whole streets of undesirable vegetation, removing site distance obstruc- 
tions at intersections and curves, and storm clean-up. The only major storm in the 
18-month period was a mini-twister on September 29, 1974, that hit Lowell Junction, 
Woburn Street, Rattlesnake Hill Road, and the upper Salem Street area. The di- 
vision worked that Sunday night to keep the roads open and eliminate hazards to the 
public; it took all of the following week to clean up the debris along the roadways. 

In the spring of 1975, Mrs. George Edmonds of the Andover Garden Club coordi- 
nated the efforts of 70 volunteers who conducted a survey of the American Elms grow- 
ing along Andover ' s roadways. An immediate benefit was the recognition of three 
American Elms whose size indicated that they were sizable shade trees 200 years ago. 
The three elms have been designated as Bicentennial Elms. The long-range benefits 
of the survey result from the Forestry Division's knowing precisely how many elms 
there are and where they are located. 

Although the division contracts the mowing of roadside weeds, the division also 
mows individual problem areas and some town-owned fields. During the winter months 
the division's men and vehicles plow snow for the Highway Division. Due to the 
nature of its equipment, the division was frequently called upon to restring flag- 
pole lines, replace outside light bulbs, paint over graffiti, and other such jobs. 
The division also maintains its own saws and other small equipment. 

Mosquito Control : 

During July and August of 1974, the division continued its night time adulti- 
cide spray. In the Spring of 1975, a contractor sprayed a larvacide material on 
2,000 acres of swamps using a helicopter. The Summer of 1975 saw a continuation of 
the adulticide applications. During both mosquito seasons in the 18-month period, 
dry weather and cool nights permitted a substantial savings by causing natural con- 
trol of the mosquito population. 



Spring Grove Cemetery 



Spring Grove Cemetery is located in the southwesterly part of the town with the 
principal entrance at the junction of Abbot Street and Spring Grove Road. 

The cemetery contains 60 acres of land, of which 14 acres are undeveloped. The 

76 



area is developed to retain its natural beauty. Lots are available to meet all re- 
quirements. 

Routine work consists of the following: interments, grounds and monuments 
maintentenance, pruning of shrubs and trees, preparing new grave sites, repairs of 
old grave sites, installing foundations and flower rings, snow and ice removal. 

During snowstorms, cemetery personnel operate trucks and plows for the Highway 
Division. 

During the 18-month period, 54 new lots were sold and there were 109 interments 
From the perpetual care payments on these lots and from payments by six lot owners 
placing their older lots into perpetual care, a total of $9,050.00 was added to the 
perpetual care fund. 

A total of $11,885.00 was received from the sale of lots, interments, foun- 
dation fees, lots under annual care and for the sale of flower rings. These general 
receipts and the income from the perpetual care fund were turned over to the Town 
Treasurer. 

Development of four new burial areas was started in 1975 because of the lack 
of existing grave lots. The new sites consist of approximately two acres divided 
into four sections serviced by existing roadways. Selected tree removal was ac- 
complished by the Forestry Division and private contract. Leaf mulch from the 
Town's compost area was hauled by the Highway Division to the new site and spread, 
plowed and harrowed by private contract. Lime, fertilizer and seed was applied and 
the new area required mowing in October. 

Mr. Herbert Philpott of Belmont, a cemetery consulting engineer has been re- 
tained to provide advice in tot layout and landscaping of the first new section. 
He will also review the present rules and regulations and make recommendations to 
update the operation of the cemetery. 



Solid Waste 



Andover's solid waste program consists of weekly curbside collection of trash 
packaged by the homeowner in plastic bags and monthly collection of bulky objects by 
appointment. The three-year contract for this collection program terminates on June 
30, 1976. Uniform plastic bags are purchased wholesale by the Town and sold locally 
by participating merchants. 

Separate garbage collection was ended in May of 1975 when the Town officials 
elected to institute combined collection of garbage and trash at a substantial 
saving to the taxpayer, utilizing the services of the trash collector. 

The Town's recycling program suffered a severe blow financially during the 18- 
month period covered by this report when the wastepaper collapsed from a high of 
$30.00 per ton to $3.00 per ton. Participation in the program has been sustained, 
however, through the efforts of a dedicated Recycling Committee using newspaper 
articles and posters as a part of its publicity campaign. 

The Town officials elected to terminate the contract for the collecting of re- 
cyclables after two years and rebid a modified collection program allowing the com- 
bining of clear glass and tin on the second week of each month and colored glass and 
tin on the fourth week of each month. Newspaper collections continued on the first 
and third weeks. Collections for recyclables occur on the same day as collection of 
trash. A one-year contract was awarded to Bill's Trucking effective July 1, 1975. 



77 



During the past eighteen months the following quantity of recycling items was 
collected: 



ITEM 



AMOUNT 



Newspapers 

Glass 

Cans 

Mixed metal 



1,119.6850 tons 

626 . 8807 tons 

83.7719 tons 

29 . 5090 tons 



Through the efforts of the Recycling Committee, a second auction was held at 
Recreation Park in April, 1975, with Philip K. Allen and Ralph Sharpe again acting 
as auctioneers. The proceeds of the auction added another $2,000.00 to the Town 
Treasury. 



Following is a summary of the recycling program as it is now being handled. 

FIRST FULL AND THIRD WEEKS (First full week means first week in month which 

starts on a Monday) 

PAPER 



SECOND WEEK 
FOURTH WEEK 



1. Newspapers, magazines (only) 

2. Corrugated cardboard collapsed and tied 

CLEAR GLASS AND CANS - in same container 

COLORED GLASS AND CANS - green and brown glass and 
cans in the same container 



FIFTH WEEK 



NO RECYCLABLE PICK UP 



INSTRUCTIONS 1. Preparation: 

Cans and glass should be rinsed. Labels may be left on and 
cans do not need to be flattened. 

2. Curbs ide: 

All recyclables must be placed at curb by 8:00 a.m. in large 
double grovery bags or suitable permanent container on your 
regular trash day. 

3. Landfill: 

Bins for recyclable materials will also be available at the 
landfill for deposit of paper, corrugated, glass, cans, metal 
and tires. 

4. Large and bulky: 

Bulky items will be picked up once a month by telephone ap- 
pointment only, 

5. Auction: 

Save all useable items for spring recycling auction. All 
proceeds to town. 

NO COLLECTIONS of recyclables or rubbish on legal holidays. All collections 
will be made ONE DAY LATER THAT WEEK. 



The landfill on Chandler Road remains open on Wednesday afternoons and all day 
Saturday for the disposal of brush and recyclables. 



78 



CO o t> o 

(oono 


o 
o 


OOOlO 
l> o o m 

HOIDH 


o 
o 
o 


t> o m 


CO 

o 
1— 1 


<=e- 


&- 



CM 



m 

CO 



&■ 



CM rH 

o co 

CO CO 

00 CO 

<-h o 

t> rH 



^ ^ 



m 


o 


C> 


rH 


rH 


CO 


U 


CD CD 


CD ,Q 


3 S 


rt CD 


rH CD 


rt CD 


CQ Q 



cocoincNinrft'-cDco 

rH^OC000r-l00CMt> 

COCMCOrHCDO'^rHirj 
CMrH<NCOOCMCOCOI> 
COrHOrHCDCOmrHCO 



CM 



<& 



HH 

o 
o 

o 
co 

rH 

w 

P-h 
Q 



O CO 
Z 

P Ph 

Ph H 

CQ 

rH 3 

K W 

H U 



CO H 
P 

Oh GO 

H W 

w z 
S o 

HS 

rH 00 

O rH 

H W 
OS K 

Cm 

h cn 

PS O 

rH 

<c 

I— I 

o 
z 
<; 
z 










3 






r-H 






a 






> 






p 






•HAJ'D 






CO 3 






O O 






PhCQ CQ 













Q -P hJQ 






d s 






HH -H 






CO O CQ Sh 




CO 


.M CD 3 




X 


3 CD 4-> P 




3 


ns p> o a 




a 


CQ rt Z § 


rH 


CQ 


O 


oS 




3 -h o3 3 


4-> 


3 


•H <P 


o 


•H 


•H [0 


Eh 




,3 P T3 10 




.3 


cn p. 3 co 




CO 


a cd o o 




a 


UOCDJ 




o 



p 

Ph 

Ph 

M 
O 

z 

I— I 
PS 

Ph 



l> O CO 

05 

rH O 00 

O O CM 

l> O CM 

00 CD 00 

CO rH CO 



#3- 



<fr 



CD 


CO 

1— 1 


O 

00 


CO 
CO 
CD 


CO <tf 
I> rH 
CD CT> 


00 
i— I 






(fr 







m- 



a p 




3 s 




CD 




•H £ 




p Ph 




03 -H 




O 3H 




SCO 




T3 pq O 




W £1 




o3 O 10 




U CO 3 




O 10 o 




<HHfi (1) 




RS bJO 3 


rH 


CO -h -h ns 


a 


CD ?H Oh rH 


p 


CO CD rH 





s -P U CD 


H 


0aiO O 




as =h co 




X -H 




w s 





Ci l> 


CD CO 


CO 


CD CM 


p CO 


CD 


■* CD 


O CD 


<tf 


rH lO 


1> rH 


m 


o m 


In cm 


CO 


»-, ^ 


.-. •-- 


~ 


rH 00 


J5 00 


rH 


^0- 


E^ 


m 



T3 




3 




03 






(0 


ax? 


■H 


rH 


XI 


OS 


10 


& 


u < 


«$ 




1— 1 


CD 


o 


N 


,3 


•H 


o 


Sh 


CQ Ph 



o 
o 



o 



o o 
o o 



m m o 
m m rH 

rH co CM 



m o 
m cm 



H #3- 



cDcomcMm^t<t>coco 

rHTtHI>COO0rH00CMl> 

COCMCOCD^OTtiCDin 
CMincMOOCDCOCDOOCTi 

corHOCMOioomcMco 



CM 



w- 





■tf 




t^ 




CTi 




r-i 


CD 


~ 


O 


rH 


3 




oj 


>> 


rH 


r-t 


c3 


3 


CQ !"3 



cooomi>cMa5CMooco 

OCDI>C0l>OC0t>CD 

ooooco^i>rHcocoai 
coi>cMa5'HHC£)THH ( j 5Cv j 

rH rH -Tf CM rH 



comomcominooo 

H^OCTlHOm^H 

mcoOrHt^airHCNCD 

OO^OOHCOCMOCD 

rH oommmoco 



CM 



W- 























m 
































CO 


t> 














CD 


















o 


en 














3 


















s 


rH 














rH 


































CD as 


















00 


- 














> > 








X3 










1— 1 


o 


T3 












Sh 








3 












CO 


^ 










3 


CD ^! 



















u 




OS 










O 


CO 








CQ 










o 


CD 


3 










CO 


CD 


















<H 


3 


rH 


h3 


TD 






u 


Ph CQ 








bC 












3 


03 


CO 


3 






CD 3 








TJ 


3 






X5 




CO 


!-3 


CQ 


03 


O 






P O 


S -P 






CD 


•H 






CD 




CD 


1 




a cq 


u 




P CO 


rt 






> 


rH 






> 




rH 


TS 


• 


1 


1 


CD 




3 Sh 


U 






■H 


3 






•rH 




3 


3 


Ph 


1 


1 


3 Ph 




O CD 


CO =H CO 




CO 


CD 


P 






CD 




P 


03 




TD 




rH -H 03 




P 


JsJ CD 




X 


O 


ni 






CJ 




■H 


ffi 


• 


u 




rH Ph Sh 




• P 


3 TS P 




3 


CD 


S 






CD 




T3 




§ 


03 




CD 03 Q 




H 3 


Kj CD 




a! 


OS 








cd 




3 


3 




3 




CQ r3 




O 


CQ rH Z 


rH 


CQ 




3 


rH 






r-H 


CD 


O 


T3 


u 




CJ • 


,3 


.3 


Jh 


a 




•P 


O 


a 




p 


a! 


Ph 




3 


a 




Pm p p • 


3 c8 


p 


3 


CO 




+-> 


CD 


CO 


p 


X! 





a a\ 




s • 


•p 


CD H 


•H «H 





•H 


0) 


P 


o 


O 


CD 


O 


W 


O 








O 3 


SrO 


CO CO 


H 




rH 


•H 


H 


3 


U Eh 




3 




• 




CD CD 


CO 


03 3 


X3 3 X5 




,3 


CD 


«H 




rt 


CD 




CO 


OS 


& 


& 




O 03 U 


T3 


N O 


CO «S 3 




CO 


p 







rH 


P 




CO 


rH 








•H 3 Sh 


rH 


•H ^ 


«J Sh 




a 


C 


rH 




ni 


3 




CD 


03 


• 






H XJ rt 


Q 


rH >, 


OH CQ 




u 


r- 1 


Ph 




CQ 


hH 




J 


CQ 


ffi >"3 




<w^ows 



79 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
JURY LIST - JUNE 197 5 



Adler, Elinor R. 
Allen, Charles F. 
Anderson, David III 
Anderson, Marguerite A. 
Anderson, Mary L. 
Anderson, Marie F. 
Arsenault, Raymond 
Auchterlonie , Robert L. 
Bailey, Francis W. 
Bajek, Mathew B. 
Ball, Ed K. 
Barnwell, John C. Ill 
Barraclough, Norman 
Barron, Thomas L. 
Barton, Marguerite A. 
Batson, J. E. David Jr. 
Baun, Philip J. Jr. 
Beanland, Agnes C. 
Beebe, Stephen 
Belisle, Donald 
Birnbach, Bernice 
Bissett , James 
Black, Charles P. 
Bobek, William J. 
Bottomley, Jean A. 
Bourque , Raymond 
Bramley, Edwin L. 
Brennan, John C. 
Broderick, Helen T. 
Broscoe , Jeannette 
Brown, Gladys P. 
Brown, Kenneth M. 
Burgess, Jordan J. 
Buchan, Ada A. 
Burns, Mildred F. 
Buschmann, Ralph E. 
Butler, Frederick 
Campbell, Collin R. 
Carmichael , Thelma 
Carr , Sherman E . 
Caswell, Helen E. 
Cataldo, Charles C. 
Cervone , Peter M. 
Clinton, Eileen H. 
Cook, Emily C. 
Copeland, Allen B. 
Coppeta , Paul J . 
Corry, Richard B. 
Cover, Brant B. 
Cox, George N. Jr. 
Crane, Virginia R. 
Cross, Jerome W. 
Crossley, John F. 
Croteau , Irene 
Daleske, Bernard L. Jr. 



Housewife 

President 

Personnel Manager 

Companion 

Asst . Librarian 

Housewife 

Lay out -Ope rat or 

Machinist 

Engineer 

Carpet Salesman 

Computer Typesetting 

Computer Programmer 

Administrative Asst. 

Transportation 

Office Clerk 

Dept . Chief 

Elec . Engineer 

Cutting Room Worker 

Marketing Accounting Mgr 

Self-employed Pool Co. 

Legal Secretary 

Grounds keeper 

Student 

Journeyman Plumber 

Store Manager 

Supervisor 

Retired 

Asst . Sales Manager 

Insurance Clerk 

Executive Secretary 

Housewife 

Electrical Engineer 

Bank Officer 

Retired 

Assembly Work 

Plant Manager 

Auditor 

Contract Administrator 

Part-Time Sales Clerk 

Accountant 

Housewife 

Unemployed 

Planning & Engr . Spec. 

Secretary 

Travel Agent 

Unemployed 

Engineering Technician 

Sales Representative 

Chemist 

Livestock Dealer 

Housewife 

Bookstore Owner 

Instrument Tech. 

Secretary/Bookkeeper 

Executive Assistant 



13 Charlotte Drive 
13 Geneva Road 
19 Downing Street 
3 Wolcott Avenue 
16 Lovejoy Road 
40 Linwood Street 

9 Ayer Street 
21 Hall Avenue 

36 Westwind Road 
82 Greenwood Road 

24 Launching Road 
89 Cross Street 
16 Arcadia Road 
430 Lowell Street 

34 Florence Street 

13 Stevens Circle 

14 Lockway Road 
29A Maple Avenue 

14 Kathleen Drive 
236 Chandler Road 

2 Bellevue Road 

112 North Main Street 
Crescent Dr., Bldg. 10 

7 Locke Street 

19 Argilla Road 
192 Beacon Street 

15 Appletree Lane 
30 Fox Hill Road 

37 Enmore Street 

16 Morton Street 

3 Holly Terrace 
21 Gleason Street 

16 Canterbury Street 

36 Central Street 
153 Andover Street 
44 Dascomb Road 

88 Ballardvale Road 

10 Carisbrooke Street 
59 Whittier Street 

13 Arundel Street 
5 Dunbarton Street 
12 Bowdoin Street 
15 Russett Lane 
50 Elm Street 

8 Karlton Circle 
65 Dascomb Road 

25 Chandler Circle 
10 Essex Street 

37 Canterbury Street 

20 Haverhill Street 
7 Argyle Street 

59 Central Street 

35 Rocky Hill Road 
180 Beacon Street 
2 Carmel Road 



80 



Darling, Richard H. 
Daly, Rowana B. 
Dauber, Barbara A. 
Dearborn, Gertrude M . 
Deleire, Charles G. 
Demers , Roland J. 
Deneu, Frank P. 
Denicola, Richard 0. 
Dennison, Kenneth F. 
Dennison, Pauline R. 
Dimmock , Zella A. 
Domasinsky, Joseph G. 
Donahue, Joseph G. 
Dooley, Helen C. 
Doran, George T. Sr . 
Doran, John F. 
Dowd , Louise M. 
Downs, Margaret A. 
Downs, Walter S. Jr. 
Doyle, William A. 
Drew, Lester A. 
Dreyer , Charles H. 
Easton, Meta S. 
Edwards, Allan E. 
Egan, John R. 
Ellsworth, Donald K. 
Emmons, Francis C. Jr. 
Fallon, Joseph E. Jr. 
Faris , George S . 
Farnham, Robert H. 
Farrar , Virginia C. 
Fee, Samuel S. 
Ferrier, Robert L. 
Fettes, Joan M. 
Finnegan, Richard 
Fisk, Charles E. 
Fitzgerald, Frederick P 
Fitzgerald, Jeremiah J. 
Foley, Walter R. 
Frank, Francis A. 
Fraser, Ellen F. 
Fredrickson, Bertha E. 
Fredrickson, Charles J. 
Fredrickson, Robert A. 
Galvin, Walter R. 
Garabedian, Souren M . 
Gaudette, George C. 
Gaunt, Charles S. 
Gendron, Cecile A. 
Giaimo, Ignatius S. 
Goddard , Harold C. Jr. 
Goldman, Sylvia K. 
Goldthwaite, Eleanor F. 
Gomes , Frank J. 
Gonzales, Roman Y. 
Gordon, Katherine M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Gorton, William G. Jr. 
Gower , Bruce H. 
Grange, Robert D. 
Grant , George A . 
Gravell, Leo J. 



JURY LIST - 1975 - 

Mechanical Engineer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Accountant 

Layout Operator 

Supervisor 

Engineering 

Professional Engineer 

Senior Bank Clerk 

Receiving Clerk 

Mailer 

Technical Advisor 

Secretary 

Sales Staff Super. 

Manager 

Mathematician 

Bookkeeper 

Management Supervisor 

Manufacturing Staff 

Custodian 

Traveling Salesman 

Bookkeeper 

Asst. Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Elec . Engineer 

Civil Engineer 

Retired 

Mechanic 

Superintendent 

Housewife 

Rubber Worker Leader 

Electrician 

Underwriting Clerk . 

Food Stamp Coordinator 

Chief Indust . Engr . 

Salesman 

Accounting Tech. 

Senior Engineer 

Computer Consultant 

Housewife 

Clerk/Bookkeeper 

President 

Asst . Art Director 

Asst . Supervisor 

Banking 

Layout Operator 

Asst. Comptroller 

Nurses Aide 

Tax Examiner 

Cost Accountant 

Hostess/Welcome Wagon 

Housewife 

Engineering Assoc. 

Senior Designer 

Housewife 

Retired 

Financial Analyst 

Sales Representative 

Manager 

Land Surveyor 

Chemical Reactor Oper . 



11 Enfield Drive 
20 Judson Road 
19 Balmoral Street 
13 Farrwood Drive 

18 Carisbrooke Street 

6 Ferndale Avenue 
40 Chandler Road 
3 Exeter Way 

112 Pine Street 
83 High Street 
51 Corbett Street 
125 North Main Street 

3 Richard Circle 
74 Pine Street 

66 Brookfield Road 
39 Clark Road 

15 Cabot Road 

123 North Main Street 
217 High Plain Road 
11 Westwind Road 
300 High Street 

2 Glenwood Road 
51 Andover Street 

88 Rattlesnake Hill Road 

11 Burton Farm Drive 
36 Linwood Street 

12 Henderson Avenue 
62 Maple Avenue 

36 Dufton Road 

122 Chestnut Street 

4 Hidden Road 

7 Buxton Court 
249 Andover Street 

5 Buxton Court 

3 Cuba Street 

24 Fox Hill Road 
95 Central Street 
38 Juliette Street 

25 Bradley Road 

9 Stratford Road 
29 Boutwell Road 
1 Arrowood Lane 

1 Arrowood Lane 

16 Arundel Street 

10 Chapman Avenue 

26 Caadlewood Drive 
117 Greenwood Road 

2 Beech Circle 

111 Shawsheen Road 
38 Osgood Street 
59 Shawsheen Road 

8 Joyce Terrace 
182 Jenkins Road 

12 Cuba Street 

123 Haverhill Street 
60C Washington Park Dr. 
60C Washington Park Dr. 

89 Pine Street 

13 Argyle Street 

9 Tanglewood Way South 

19 Harding Street 

4 Charlotte Drive 



81 



JURY LIST - 1975 - 



Gravell, Mary R. 
Green, Sybil S. 
Greenwood, Ralph L. Jr. 
Greenwood , Robert E . 
Gregory, Nicholas 
Griswold, Donald M . 
Guerrera , Jeannette D. 
Guittarr, Ronald E. 
Gulezian, Vahey S. 
Halbach, Eric E. 
Hannan, Laurence J. Jr. 
Hansen, Edwin B. Jr. 
Harding, John C. 
Harriman, Wayne 
Harris, Don S. 
Harvey, Frederick C. Ill 
Haslam, Robert T. 
Haugh, Mary L. 
Hayes, Charles E. 
Healy, George 
Hebert , Frank A . 
Heseltine, Eleanor M. 
Hindman, Marion D. 
Hobbs , Stewart B. 
Hoffman, Joseph W. 
Hoffman, S. Joseph 
Holt , Henry G. Jr . 
Horan, Joseph A. 
Howard, John L. Jr. 
Ippolito, Esther C. 
Jacques, Henry E. Jr. 
Jako , Gaspar 
Jarvis , Arthur B. 
Jensen, Richard A. 
Johnson, Jane W. 
Kalil, George H. 
Kelly, John 
Kern, David L. 
Kibbee, Dorothy E. 
King, Paul K. 
Kinsella, Marcelle C. 
Koromhas , William 
Klie, Robert H. 
Kothman, Francis A. Jr. 
Krull, Betty A. 
Kruse , Anne G. 
Landry, Ernest J. 
Lansdowne , Kenneth H. 
LaRoche , Jeannette T. 
Laurenza , Samuel E. 
Lavin, Marie E. 
Lelacheur, Francis A. 
Lenes , Robert J . 
Lenk, Elmer N. 
Leonardi, Anthony P. 
Leone, William J. 
Levin, Morton P. 
Llyod, Raymond H. 
Locke, Benjamin W. 
Loosigian, Suren 
Lounsbury , Alan E. 
Low, Thomas W. 



Housewife 
Housewife 

Maintenance-Carpenter 
Toolmaker 

Electronic Engineer 
Toolmaker 
Writer 

Manager Administration 
Elec . Engineer 
Planning Engineer 
Lab. Technician 
Salesmanager 
Project Leader 
Electrical Helper 
Purchasing Manager 
Sr . Quality Control Tech 
Sr . Public Relations 
Housewife 
Retired 

Sr . Management Analyst 
Pipe Fitter 
Housewife 
At Home 

Deputy Director 
Contractor 
Executive Vice-Pres . 
Manager 
Retired 

Merchandising Dir . 
Homemaker 

Quality Control Analyst 
Social Work/Director 
Engineer 

Electrical Engineer 
Housewife 
Programmer 
Inspector, Q. C. 
Plant Manager 
■ Housewife 

Account Administrator 
Records Clerk 
Project Engineer 
Elec. Engineer 
Equipment Editor 
Assistant Manager 
Housewife 
Senior Engineer 
Electronic Engineer 
Order Checker 
Service Manager 
Homemaker 

Registered Pharmacist 
Engineer 
Supervisor 
Systems Analyst 
Treas ./Furniture Store 
Unemployed 
Sales Manager 
Machinist 
Brake Operator 
Jr. Project Coordinator 
Prod. Control 



4 Charlotte Drive 

11 Chandler Road 
93 Porter Road 

62 Stevens Street 
40 Haggetts Pond Road 
4 Dumbarton Street 
28 Cuba Street 
16 Shaw Drive 

10 Arthur Road 
147 Summer Street 
51 Whittier Street 

12 Vine Street 

129 Haverhill Street 
192 North Main Street 

11 Sherry Drive 

1 Reservation Road 

116 Dascomb Road 

19 Blood Road 

90 Cheever Circle 

126 Lowell Street 

31 Bannister Road 

21 Strawberry Hill Road 

10 Castle Heights Road 

43 Farrwood Drive 

57 Marilyn Drive 

28 Hidden Way 

9 Canterbury Street 

200 Chandler Road 

16 Bowdoin Road 

19 Bradley Road 

76 Haverhill Street 

4 Chickering Court 

215 Greenwood Road 

15 Enfield Drive 

4 Applecrest Road 
56 Lupine Road 
124 Main Street 
34 Enmore Street 
78 Maple Avenue 
33 High Street 

37 Balmoral Street 

9 Abbot Bridge Drive 
40B Washington Park Dr. 

23 Central Street 
55 Greenwood Road 

12 Arcadia Road 

8 Dufton Road 

162 High Plain Road 
90 Chandler Road 
3 Flint Circle 

9 Robandy Road 
8 High Street 

3 Hackney Circle 
3 Phaeton Circle 
6 Ayer Street 

38 Canterbury Street 
15 Candlewood Drive 
Crescent Dr., Bldg. 9 
189 Highland Road 

3 Blanchard Street 

24 Arundel Street 

5 Maple Court 



82 



Lowe, John C. 
Lowe, Margaret B. 
Lucy, Marguerite M. 
Lundgren, Donald E. 
MacKenzie, Earl Jr. 
Mackie, Vernon 
Macklin, Francis G. 
Manock, Mary 

Marjerison, Thomas S. Jr 
Marland, Robert E. 
Marshall, Karl L. 
Marvin, Harold A. 
Mattei, Robert C. 
May, Catherine G. 
McCabe , Gladys G. 
McDaniel , Richard A. 
McDonald, Walter F. 
McGrath, John M. 
Mclntyre, John A. 
Mclntyre, Louis J. 
McKeon, John J. 
McNulty, Joanna M. 
Metcalf, Paul T. II 
Miller, Kenneth E. 
Milligan, Charles E. 
Milne, Rosemarie 
Mitchener, Marjorie 
Mooney , William F. 
Monan, Joseph L. 
Moorhead , David F. 
Moriarty, Daniel L 
Moritz , Seymour I . 
Moss, George M. 
Murgia, Robert D. 
Murphy, Mary L. 
Murphy, Maurice J. 
Murphy , Veronica T . 
Nannis, Sybil A. 
Nichols, Robert M. 
Northey, Helen L. 
Nowell, Frederick N. Jr. 
Oelwang, Robert C. 
O'Leary, Thomas J. Jr. 
Olney, Elinor B. 
Olsson, Robert J. 
Packard, Leslie 
Palermo, Linda 
Parson, Esther M. 
Patterson, Mark A. 
Pearson, Jack C. 
Peck, Marvin J. 
Penkus , David C. 
Perry, Virginia M. 
Pickard , Derek 
Pierson, Victor 
Pinkney, David W. 
Plonowski, Edward T. 
Ploussios, George 
Poynter , Elizabeth V. 
Poynter, Horace M. Jr. 
Praetz , Raymond J. 
Price, Peter E. 



JURY LIST - 1975 - 

Retired 

Clerk 

At Home 

Funeral Director 

Purchasing Manager 

Sr . Administrator 

Salesman 

Homemaker 

Office Manager 

Retired 

Administration Service 

Foundry Owner 

Bartender 

Retired 

Housewife 

Manager 

Oil Sales 

Field Engineering Rep. 

Account Manager 

Security Guard 

Millwright 

Housewife/Clerk 

Draftsman 

Industrial Engineer 

Retired 

Retired 

Housewife 

Civil Engineer 

Retired 

Chief Engineer 

Insurance Representative 

Senior Engineer 

Superintendent 

Retired 

Housewife/Clerk 

Electrical Engineer 

Asst . Vice-Pres . (Bank) 

Counter Help 

Draftsman 

Hostess 

Insurance Broker 

Retail Store Manager 

Manpower Planner 

Housewife 

Personnel Manager 

Elec . Engineer 

Waitress 

Librarian 

Field Service Trainee 

Educational Facility 

Banking/Treasurer 

Sr . Elect. Engineer 

Housewife 

Food Service Director 

Adhesive Chemist 

Senior Staff Engineer 

Curer 

Vice-President 

Housewife 

Mechanical Engineer 

Project Engineer 

Chief Engineer 



6 Sutherland Street 
6 Sutherland Street 
149 Chestnut Street 
18 Elm Street 
15 Crestwood Drive 
Crescent Dr., Bldg. 10 
487 South Main Street 
56 Summer Street 
87 Burnham Road 

8 George Street 
119 Chestnut Street 

9 Partridge Hill Road 

6 Crescent Drive 
81 High Street 

5 Appletree Lane 

3 Donald Circle 

8 Chestnut Street 

83 Pine Street 
231 Andover Street 

7 Dufton Road 

20A Washington Park Dr 
200 Elm Street 

84 High Street 

37 Corbett Street 

21 Tewksbury Street 
20 Cuba Street 

2 Oriole Drive 
26 Burnham Road 
13 Maple Avenue 
12 Bradley Road 
12 Essex Street 

10 Barrington Drive 
92 Dascomb Road 

8 Canterbury Street 
36 Washington Avenue 
10 Abbot Bridge Drive 
49 Carmel Road 

4 Amherst Road 
69 Gould Road 

52 Rocky Hill Road 
23 Cheever Circle 

5 Barrington Drive 
36 High Street 

79 Shawsheen Road 

9 Deerberry Lane 

75 Shawsheen Road 
17 Bowdoin Road 
104 Hidden Road 

22 Upland Road 

76 Cross Street 

10 Fairfax Drive 

8 Hawthorne Circle 

218 Holt Road 

60 Burnham Road 

Crescent Dr., Bldg. 9 

12 Ivanhoe Lane 

59 Haverhill Street 

4 Hackney Circle 

68 Elm Street 

68 Elm Street 

97 Cross Street 

20 Johnson Road 



83 



JURY LIST - 1975 - 



Putnam, Eugene M . 
Quesenberry , Isabel M. 
Ratte, Alfred A. 
Raye, Josephine C. 
Raymond , Frank 
Reason, Arthur W. 
Reed, Robert G. 
Reghitto, William M. 
Ricci, Arthur J. 
Richmond, Janet L. 
Rindone, Viola M. 
Rokicki , Henry V. 
Romano, Lawrence 
Rosen, David F. 
Rossbach, C. Frederick 
Sadowsky, Arthur J. 
Sadowsky, Benita 
Saliby, Emeline A. 
Sanchez, Virgil, W. Jr 
Sawaya, Mitchell 
Sawaya , Vivian 
Schmidt, William C. 
Schwartz, Samuel 
Schwind, Peter 
Seero, Edward V. 
Seifel, Mary G. 
Seikunas, Adolph P. 
Selden, Georgeanna G. 
Shea, John J. 
Sheehy , Kathleen C. 
Shiebler, Mary W. 
Shrestinian, Ara 
Silva, Arthur 
Silverman, George 
Simpson, Anne G. 
Sloan, John P. 
Smalley, Bart F. 
Smith, Richard P. 
Snyder, Edith J. 
Staniewicz, Paul M. 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Stanton, Walter L. 
Sullivan, Edward 
Sullivan, Frances 
Sweeney, John F. 
Symons , Fred 
Szymanowski, Margaret 
Tallini, Lucille 
Tarmey , Robert J. 
Taylor, Raymond L. 
Thomas, Dolores 
Thomes , Philip F. 
Thompson, Alice C. 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thomson, Alexander Jr. 
Torrisi, Thomas P. 
Townsend, Gary A. 
Tracy , Douglas 
Travis, Lewis F. 
Trenholm, James T. 
Tweedie, Villa J. 
Twigg, John E. 



Department Chief 

Housewife 

President & Salesman 

Tax Examiner 

Programmer 

Superintendent 

Bank Auditor 

Asst . Vice-President 

Office Administration 

Accounts Payable 

Housewife 

Program Manager 

Janitor 

Contractor 

Banker 

Welder 

Housewife 

Wine Consultant 

Senior Engineer 

Sr . Engr . Administrator 

Secretary 

Retired 

Retired 

Senior Engineer 

Student /Re tired 

Free Lance Copywriter 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Asst. Comptroller 

Housewife/Bookkeeper 

Clerk 

V.P. Testing & Insp. 

Retired 

Antiques 

Tester 

Inventory Control 

Retired 

Dept . Chief 

Housewife 

Contract Accountant 

Retired 

Serviceman/Oil Heating 

Lineman 

Insurance Broker 

Asst . Treasurer 

Customer Service Engr. 

Housewife 

Wireman 

Internal Revenue Service 

Director 

Housewife 

Stock Room Clerk 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Steamf itter 

Vice-President 

Assembler 

Marketing Representative 

Communications-Superv . 

Sales Representative 

Housewife 

Storekeeper 



12 Charlotte Drive 
174 Andover Street 
Crescent Dr., Bldg. 8 
8 Bowdoin Road 
50 County Road 

7 Walker Avenue 

8 Elm Court 

17 High Plain Road 
95 Haverhill Street 

30 Bancroft Road 

27 Rock Ridge Road 
33 Brown Street 

4 Sweeney Court 
344 High Plain Road 

3 Carisbrooke Street 
43 Brookfield Road 

43 Brookfield Road 

19 Marion Avenue 

28 Burton Farm Drive 

5 Twin Brooks Circle 
5 Twin Brooks Circle 

18 Arthur Road 

5 Arthur Road 

20 Kathleen Drive 

8 Fox Hill Road 
56 Porter Road 

21 Gould Road 

40 School Street 

6 Washington Avenue 
241 Lowell Street 
29A Maple Avenue 

5 Mitton Circle 
64 Chandler Road 

6 Parnassus Place 
16 Gray Road 

22 Enmore Street 

19 Hall Avenue 

4 Napier Road 
63 Maple Avenue 
Crescent Dr., Bldg. 7 

23 Pasho Street 
6 Fleming Avenue 

4 Appletree Lane 

28 Sagamore Drive 

44 Brookfield Road 
10 Carmel Road 

3 Cassimere Street 
19 Marland Street 

31 Essex Street 

15 Charlotte Drive 

9 Rocky Hill Road 

5 Hartigan Court 
19 Chandler Circle 
3 Walnut Avenue 

29 Stevens Street 
67 Lucerne Drive 
Crescent Dr., Bldg. 11 
26 Lucerne Drive 

62 Elm Street 
15 Westwind Road 
12 Wolcott Avenue 
16A Harding Street 



84 



JURY LIST - 1975 - 



VanDerZee, Robert 
Vernon, John G. 
Vogt , Stanley 0. 
Wadman, Homer C. 
Wagner , Henry 
Wainwright, Henry 
Wait, John P. 
Wall, John M. 
Walsh, Mary E. 
Walsh, Monica L. 
Warhurst , Norman 
Webb, Alfred E. 
Webb, Judith L. 
Weinstein, Mark A. 
Weir, William N. 
Weinz, David 
West, Helen 
Wheat ley, James B. 
White, Cyril M. 
White, Kathleen A. 
Wilbur, Kari J. 
Wilbur, Mona L. 
Willis, Ruth 
Wilson, Ethel M. 
Wilson, Kenneth 0. 
Wilson, Walter 
Winters, Philip A. 
Wood, Robert F. 
Workman, David E. 
Wrigley, Henry W. 
Yaghmoorian, Ann 
Zaharris, Bette 
Yancy, Frederick R. 
Zappala, Thomas A. 
Zaremba , Stanley A. 
Zussman, Peter E. 
Zwicker, Ernest 



Service Representative 

General Service Officer 

Department Chief 

Retired 

Printer 

Supervisor 

Certified Public Acct . 

Industrial Relations 

Housewife 

Homemaker 

Salesman 

Auto Body Repair 

Bookkeeper 

Electrical Engineer 

Systems Analyst 

Type Designer 

Housewif e/L .P.N. 

Program Manager 

Chief Audit Division 

Secretary 

Housewife 

Homemaker 

Realtor/Housewife 

Office Manager 

Store Clerk 

Pres ./Steel Fab. 

Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Manager of Systems 

Unemployed 

Secretary 

At Home 

Retired 

Manager 

Utility Operator 

Student /Co liege 

Retired 



1 Napier Road 

48 Balmoral Street 
11 Carmel Road 
107 High Street 

28 Marland Street 
53 High Plain Road 
36 Lowell Street 

5 Surrey Lane 
186 Salem Street 
33 Rock Ridge Road 
18 Riverina Road 

86 Ballardvale Road 
86 Ballardvale Road 
3 Crestwood Drive 

49 Lupine Road 
228 Andover Street 
72 Morton Street 
49 Greenwood Road 
28 Karlton Circle 
11 Stirling Street 

2 Meadowbrook Drive 
62 Brookfield Road 

6 Porter Road 

88 Lowell Street 

93 Tewksbury Street 

28 William Street 

42 Enmore Street 

21 Abbot Bridge Road 

9 Lovejoy Road 

1 Lowell Jet. Road 

7 Cassimere Street 
6 Chaise Circle 

9 Central Street 

59 Carmel Road 

421 South Main Street 

68 Sunset Rock Road 

195 Greenwood Road 



85 



as 






SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 1, 1974 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, September 3, 1974, the Inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and assembled 
in the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Monday, the seventh day of October 
1974 at 7:30 P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator, at 7:48 P.M. 

Check lists were used at the entrance and showed 386 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

Opening prayer was offered by the Rev. Thomas T. Call, Minister of the West 
Parish Church of Andover. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George Heseltine. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the auditorium. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit four non-voters to the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the reading of the warrant 
and the return of service of the Constable be dispensed with, and that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number. 



Essex, SS 



October 1, 1974 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days . 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was in- 
curred in the fiscal year beginning January 1, 1973 and ending June 30, 1974. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Town transfer from 
available funds and appropriate the sum of $549.60 to pay the following bills in- 
curred in the fiscal year beginning January 1, 1973 and ending June 30, 1974 as 
follows : 



Central Service 

D. P. W. 

Recreation 

Library 

Finance Committee 



Royal Typewriter Company 
Middlesex Welding Supply Co, 
J. L. Hammett 
Library of Congress 
Mrs . Mary Morton 



$92.85 

7.54 

148.56 

264.90 

35.75 

$549.60 



ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 20C of Chapter 90 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, authorizing the Board of Selectmen, from time to 
time, to establish by rule or regulation a schedule of fines for offenses subject 
to the aforesaid Section committed within the Town of Andover. 



86 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was unanimously VOTED that Article 2 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Bylaws of the Town, by 
inserting the following as Article XII, Section 17, "Removal of Recyclable 
Materials" : 

The removal from a public sidewalk, way or the usual point of residential 
pick-up, of any materials specifically set apart from the ordinary house- 
hold rubbish for the purpose of being recycled under the recycling program 
of the Town of Andover by persons other than those persons authorized to 
pick up such material by the Town of Andover, or its agents, is prohibited. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the Bylaws by inserting the fol- 
lowing as: Article XII, Section 17, "Removal of Recyclable Materials": 

The removal from a public sidewalk, way or the usual point of residential 
pick-up, of any materials specifically set apart from the ordinary house- 
hold rubbish for the purpose of being recycled under the recycling program 
of the Town of Andover by persons other than those persons authorized to 
pick up such material by the Town of Andover, or its agents, is prohibited. 

Article 3 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing and installing 
traffic lights at the intersection of Lowell Street, Shawsheen Road and Beacon 
Street . 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 4 be approved as printed in 
the amount of $25,000.00 from available funds. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Donald Mulvey. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to the exchange of land with George 
Chongris of Andover, said land being located on the Southwesterly side of Greenwood 
Road and being shown on a plan entitled: "Preliminary Plan of Land owned by George 
Chongris located in Andover, Mass., Scale 1' = 40 feet, April, 1974. Charles E. 
Cyr, Reg. Land Surveyor", said exchange to involve the transfer by the Town of 
Andover to George Chongris of all its right title and interest in the area shown on 
said plan between Lots 1 through 4, inclusive, and the Southwesterly line of Green- 
wood Road, and the transfer by George Chongris to the Town of Andover of approxi- 
mately 4.5 acres of land to the Southwest of Lots 1 through 4, inclusive, as delin- 
eated on the aforementioned plan. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Selectmen be authorized to ac- 
cept, by gift, approximately 4.5 acres of land shown on a plan entitled, "Prelimi- 
nary Plan of Land Owned by George Chongris located in Andover, Mass., 1" =40', 
April, 1974, Charles E. Cyr, Reg. Land Surveyor," from George Chongris for conser- 
vation purposes. I further move that the Selectmen be authorized to convey to 
George Chongris all of the Town of Andover's rights, title and interest in lots 1 
through 4 inclusive and the southwesterly line of Greenwood Road, adjacent to said 
lots, as shown on said plan referred to above, after the street lines on Greenwood 
Road have been determined and after the Selectmen in their sole discretion have 
determined that any of the aforesaid land is not needed for town purposes. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Margaret R. Keck. 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $6,000.00 to pay the wages of one (1) Water Meter Reader in 
the Andover Department of Public Works through June 30, 1975. 

Article 6 was withdrawn. 

87 



ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and ap- 
propriate the sum of $4,200.00 to purchase and equip an automobile for the use of 
Water Meter Readers in the Andover Department of Public Works. 

Article 7 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $31,200.00 and authorize the Town Manager to enter into a 
contract for the period beginning January 1, 1974 and ending at midnight on Decem- 
ber 31, 1974 with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and to use said 
sum or any part thereof to defray Andover's share of the net avoidable cost of the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority resulting from their providing commuter 
rail service from Andover to Boston and from Boston to Andover. 

Article 8 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $2,250.00 for services to be provided by the Merrimack Valley 
Home Care Corporation to residents of the Town of Andover, of the age of 60 or more 
years . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as written in the 
Warrant in the amount of $2,250.00 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 for the purpose of supplementing the appropria- 
tion for street lighting for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1974 and ending June 
30, 1975. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 10 as written in the 
Warrant in the amount of $10,000.00 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to increase the membership of the 
School Committee from 5 to 7 members to become effective in the following manner: 

In 1975 - Three members to be elected, two of whom will serve a term of 
two years and one to serve a term of one year, the member re- 
ceiving the least number of votes on the day of election shall 
serve one year ; 

1976 - Three members to be elected for a term of two years; 

1977 - Four members to be elected for a term of two years; 

and thereafter, three and four members to be elected on alternative years, all for 
two-year terms, on petition of Irving L. Newman and others. 

Article 11 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 12 . To change from single residence C to Apartment District the follow- 
ing described parcels of land: 

Two parcels of land in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts and situated 
off of the easterly side of South Main Street (also known as State High- 
way Route 28) , and being Northerly and Northeasterly of a tract of land 
recently conveyed by Warren B. Winn, et al to New England Power Company, 
which said tract is shown on plan 6220 recorded in Northern Essex District 
Registry of Deeds. Said parcels are more particularly described as follows: 

First Parcel : Originally consisting of 31.96 acres and shown as Lot B on a 

plan entitled "Plan of Land in Andover and North Reading, Mass. as surveyed 

for the Heirs of Emma Holt Winn, Dec, 1956, scale 1" - 100 feet, and drawn 

by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Prof. Eng . " , and recorded in the Northern Essex 

District Registry of Deeds as Plan 3413, to which plan reference can be made 

for a more complete description. EXCLUDING THEREFROM DEED FROM WARREN B. WINN 
ET AL. TO NEW ENGLAND POWER COMPANY. 

88 



Second Parcel: Originally consisting of 8.47 acres, more or less, and 
shown as Lot A on said Plan 3413, to which reference is made for a more 
complete description. 

Meaning and intending to include those parcels of land shown on Assessors' 
Map 85 as parcels 20 and 21. 

on petition of Jean M. Levey and others. 

Article 12 was defeated. The vote was less than the two-thirds vote required. An 
unfavorable report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Stanley Saba. 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will amend the Bylaws of the Town of Andover by 
adding a Provision for Recall of Elected Officials following Section IV of the By- 
laws of the Town of Andover. 

Note to registered voters: Revisions to this Bylaw amendment may be made for 
technical improvements, where necessary. Any changes of substance will be 
made only by amendment during Town Meeting consideration. 

The specific provision sections are as follows: 

RECALL OF ELECTED OFFICIALS 

Section . (a) Any holder of an elective office may be recalled therefrom by 

the registered voters of the town as herein provided. 

(b) Any twenty-five (25) registered voters of the town may file 
with the town clerk an affidavit containing the name of the officer sought to be 
recalled and a statement of the grounds for recall. The town clerk shall thereupon 
deliver to said voters making the affidavit copies of petition blanks demanding 
such recall, copies of which printed forms he shall keep available. The blanks 
shall be issued by the town clerk with his signature and official seal attached 
thereto. They shall be dated, shall be addressed to the selectmen and shall con- 
tain the names of all persons to whom they are issued, the name of the person whose 
recall is sought, the grounds of recall as stated in the affidavit, and shall demand 
the election of a successor in the said office. A copy of the petition shall be 
entered in a record book kept in the office of town clerk. The recall petition 
shall be returned and filed with the town clerk within twenty (20) days after the 
filing of the affidavit, and shall have been signed by at least twenty-five (25) 
percent of the registered voters of the town, who shall add to their signatures the 
street and number, if any, of their residence. 

The town clerk shall, within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt, submit the petition 
to the registrars of voters in the town, and the registrars shall forthwith certify 
thereon the number of signatures which are names of registered voters of the town. 

(c) If the petition shall be found and certified by the town clerk 
to be sufficient, he shall submit the same with his certificate to the selectmen 
without delay, and the selectmen shall forthwith give written notice of the receipt 
of the certificate to the officer sought to be recalled and shall order an election 
to be held on a date fixed by them not less than twenty-five (25) nor more than 
thirty-five (35) days after the date of the town clerk's certificate that a suffi- 
cient petition has been filed; provided, however, that if any other town election 
is to occur within sixty (60) days after the date of the certificate, the selectmen 
shall postpone the holding of the recall election to the date of such other election 
If a vacancy occurs in said office after a recall election has been ordered, the 
election shall nevertheless proceed as provided in this section. 

(d) Any officer sought to be removed may be a candidate to succeed 
himself, and unless he requests otherwise in writing, the town clerk shall place 
his name on the ballot without nomination. The nomination of other candidates, the 
publication of the warrant for the removal election, and the conduct of the same, 
shall all be in accordance with the provisions of law relating to elections, unless 
otherwise provided in this section. 

89 



(e) The incumbent shall continue to perform the duties of his of- 
fice until the recall election. If then reelected, he shall continue in office for 
the remainder of his unexpired term, subject to recall as before, except as provided 
in this section. If not reelected in the recall election, he shall be deemed re- 
moved upon the qualification of his successor, who shall hold office during the un- 
expired term. If the successor fails to qualify within five (5) days after receiv- 
ing notification of his election, the incumbent shall thereupon be deemed removed 
and the office vacant. 

(f) Ballots used in a recall election shall submit the following 
propositions in the order indicated: 

For the recall of (name of officer) 

Against the recall of (name of officer) 

Immediately at the right of each proposition, there shall be a square in which the 
voter may vote for either of said propositions. Under the proposition shall appear 
the word "Candidates", the directions to voters required by section 42 of chapter 54 
of the general laws, and beneath this the names of candidates nominated as herein- 
before provided. If a majority of votes cast upon the question of recall is in the 
affirmative, the candidate receiving the highest number of votes shall be declared 
elected. If a majority of votes on the question is in the negative, the ballots 
for candidates need not be counted. 

(g) No recall petition shall be filed against an officer within 
three (3) months after he takes office, nor, in the case of an officer subjected to 
a recall election and not recalled thereby, until at least six (6) months after the 
election at which his recall was submitted to the voters of the town has elapsed. 

(h) No person who has been recalled from an office, or who has re- 
signed from office while recall proceedings were pending against him, shall be ap- 
pointed to any town office within two (2) years after such recall or such resigna- 
tion. 

on petition of Douglas F. Mitchell and others. 

Article 13 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 10:03 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



Elden R. Salter 
Town Clerk 



90 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 3, 1975 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, January 27, 1975, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
assembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
and Six, Viz: the Lower Parish Hall, Free Christian Church on Elm Street, Precinct 
One; the Lower Hall, Andover Baptist Church, in Precinct Two, the Cardinal Cushing 
Gymnasium, Haverhill Street, in Precinct Three; the West Elementary School, Beacon 
Street, in Precinct Four; the Fellowship Hall, Ballardvale United Church, Clark 
Road, Ballardvale, in Precinct Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in 
Precinct Six, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE THIRD DAY OF MARCH, 1975 

at 7:00 o'clock A. M. to act upon the following articles: 

ESSEX, SS March 3, 1975 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and places and for the purposes stated in said warrant , by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 



ARTICLE 1. 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at seven o'clock A. M. 
and closed at eight o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 5,380, viz: 





Precinct 1 
Precinct 4 


94C 
- 1381 


) 


Precinc 
Precinc 


t 2 - 461 Precinct 
t 5 - 508 Precinct 


3 - 
6 - 


800 
1290 




PRECINCTS 














1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


MODERATOR-FOR ONE YEAR 
William J. Dalton 






788 


358 


666 


1176 


415 


1105 


4508 


152 


103 


134 


205 


93 


185 


Blanks 

SELECTMEN - ONE FOR THREE 


YEARS 


872 


482 


178 


396 


820 


253 


884 


Alan F. French 




3013 


437 


273 


366 


505 


229 


375 


George W. Connors, Jr. 




2185 


21 


10 


38 


56 


26 


31 


Blanks 




182 



43 


193 


301 


610 


173 


36 


40 


46 


49 


29 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - ONE FOR THREE YEARS 

282 Arthur G. Ahem 1902 

55 Gary A. Townsend 255 

91 







PRECINCTS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


532 


211 


415 


695 


293 


923 


29 


17 


38 


27 


13 


30 



418 


189 


330 


649 


217 


671 


David R. 


Ahouse 


306 


150 


297 


487 


155 


305 


Ethel V. 


Howard 


172 


102 


153 


206 


117 


292 


Pasquale 


A. Marino 


44 


20 


20 


39 


19 


22 


Blanks 





Elaine F. Viehmann 3069 

Blanks 154 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - TO FILL VACANCY FOR ONE 

YEAR 

2474 

1700 

1042 

164 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY - ONE FOR FIVE YEAR!: 



749 


351 


631 


1069 


379 


1012 


191 


110 


169 


312 


129 


278 



John B. White, Jr. 4191 

Blanks 1189 

QUESTION NO. 1 



521 283 520 778 298 639 YES 3039 

303 113 204 465 145 548 NO 1778 

116 65 76 138 65 103 Blanks 563 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 1 March 3, 1975 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2000. Number of spoiled ballots 5. Number 
of unused ballots 1064. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1069. Number of ballots 
voted 940. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 937. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
937. Number of write in ballots processed 0. 

Number of absentee ballots — Machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 6 - Number of 
absentee ballots hand voted and counted at precinct 3. Grand Total for Precinct 940 
Forrest H. Noyes, Jr., Warden. Plice Officer on duty, Lt . Hector G. Pattullo, Jr. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 2 March 3, 1975 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1000. Number of spoiled ballots 0. Number of 
unused ballots 541. Total spoiled and unused ballots 541. Number of ballots voted 
459. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer count 461, 
Number of defective ballots 3. Number of ballots counted by computer 458. Number 
of write in ballots processed 0. Number of absentee ballots - Machine voted at 
Town Clerk's Office 2 - Number of absentee ballots hand voted and counted at preci- 
nct 0. Grand Total for Precinct 461. Fernand J. Lussier, Warden. Robert J. 
Fanning, Jr., Police Officer on duty. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 3 March 3, 1975 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2000. Number of spoiled ballots 4. Number of 

92 






inused ballots 1200. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1204. Number of ballots 
voted 796. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 800. Number of defective ballots from defective tally sheet 5. Number of 
ballots counted by computer 795. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of absentee 
ballots — Machine voted at Town Clerk's office 4 - Number of absentee ballots hand 
voted and counted at precinct 0. Grand Total for precinct 800. A. Norman Warhurst , 
Warden. Police Officer on duty, David St. Jean. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 4 March 3, 1975 

Number of votomatic ballots received 3000. Number of spoiled ballots 6. Number of 
unused ballots 1620. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1626. Number of ballots 
voted 1374. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 1378. Number of defective ballots 7. Number of ballots counted by computer 
1371. Number of write-in ballots processed 0. Number of absentee ballots -- 
Machine voted at Town Clerk's office 4 - Number of absentee ballots hand voted and 
counted at precinct 3. Grand Total for Precinct 1381. Warden, James D. Doherty. 
Police Officer on duty, Lt . Lloyd Belbin. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 5 March 3, 1975 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1000. Number of spoiled ballots 4. Number of 
unused ballots 493. Number of ballots voted 503. Number of overvoted ballots 0. 
Total number of ballots for computer count 507. Number of defective ballots 1. 
Number of ballots counted by computer 506. Number of write-in ballots processed 0. 
Number of absentee ballots — Machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 4 - Number of 
absentee ballots hand voted and counted at precinct 1. Grand total for Precinct 
508. Warden, Irving 0. Piper. Police Officer on duty, Russell H. Berthel. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 6 March 3, 1975 

Number of votomatic ballots received 3000. Number of spoiled ballots 4. Number of 
unused ballots 1719. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1723. Number of ballots 
voted 1277. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 1285. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
1285. Number of write-in ballots processed 0. Number of absentee ballots -- 
Machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 8 - Number of absentee ballots hand voted and 
counted at precinct 5. Grand total for precinct 1290. Warden, Albert R. Retelle, 
Police Officer on duty, Sgt . Jacob Jacobson. 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Monday, March 31, 1975 at 7:30 o'clock 
P. M. at the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



93 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, MARCH 31, 1975 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 507 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator, at 7:45 P. M. 

The opening prayer was offered by the Rev. David A. Hollenbeck of the Ballardvale 
United Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George E. Heseltine. 

Consent was voted to admit 12 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the Auditorium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator be allowed 
to dispense with the reading of the Warrant, the return of service of the Constable, 
that he be allowed to refer to the Articles by number as they appear in the warrant, 
and that the reading of the names of non-voters be dispensed with. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one 
School Committee member for three years, one School Committee member for one year 
(To fill Vacancy), one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years and 
any other town officers required by law to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the 
following question: 

QUESTION -- "Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, 
holding or conducting a game commonly called beano?" 

All the above candidates and question to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 7:00 o'clock A. M. to 8:00 o'clock P. M. 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter, announced the results of the election and question on 
March 31, 1975 and declared William J. Dalton elected as Moderator and that he had 
previously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their re- 
spective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of the 
duties of their offices. 

William J. Dalton, Moderator for One Year 

Alan F. French, Selectman for Three Years 

Elaine F. Viehmann, School Committee for Three Years 

David R. Ahouse , School Committee for One Year (To fill Vacancy) 

John B. White, Jr., Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

QUESTION - YES, 3,039 - NO, 1,778 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by 
ballot . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that John M. Murray be elected Trustee of 
the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected Town Officers for the ensu- 
ing year. 

94 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the salaries of the elected Town 
officials be established as follows: 

Moderator $100.00 for each Annual Town 

Meeting and $25,00 for each 
Special Town Meeting except when 
it falls within the Annual Meeting. 

Selectmen-Chairman $1,000.00 per year 
Selectmen-Members $ 800.00 per year 

ARTICLE 4. To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1975 and ending June 30, 1976 as submitted by the Town 
Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee in its report. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money: 



Town Moderator 
Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Elections and Registrations 

Finance Committee 

Town Accountant 

Collector-Treasurer 

Board of Assessors 

Purchasing & Systems 

Town Counsel 
Town Clerk 

Planning Board 
Municipal Buildings 
Conservation Commission 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses (incl. 
$100 for out-of-state 
travel ) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$150 for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$750 for out-of-state travel 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$400 for out-of-state travel 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$250 for out-of-state travel 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



$ 



125.00 

4,800.00 
3,341.00 



66 

6 

17 

13 

1 
4 

50 
9 

55 
11 



45 
19 



38 
9 



12 
10 

21 
4 



11 
19 

30 
29 

1 
8 



101.00 
400.00 
479.00 
315.00 

200.00 
150.00 

874.00 
199.00 

808.00 
575.00 



977.00 
130.00 



050.00 
350.00 



500.00 
000.00 

210.00 
950.00 



340.00 
215.00 

806.00 
560.00 

000.00 
080.00 



95 



Development and Industrial 
Commission 

Central Services 

Council on Aging 

Board of Appeals 

Police Department 



Fire Department 



Civil Defense 
Animal Control 

Electrical Inspection 

Weights and Measures 

Building Inspector 

Inspection Services 

Highways 



General Administration 

Parks 

Forestry 

Vehicle Maintenance 

Street Lighting 
Engineering 



Other Expenses 



Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
($784,648.00 less $245,000.00 
from General Revenue Sharing) 
Other Expenses (incl. 
$300 for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

($858,366 

less $245,000.00 from General 

Revenue Sharing) 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$350 for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$100 for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

($331,300.00 less 

$174,795 from Chapter 825 of the 

Acts of 1974) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl, 

$600 for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



700.00 



24,836.00 

7,800.00 
8,693.00 

3,755.00 
1,100.00 

539,648.00 



104.800.00 



613,366.00 



40,950.00 



1,500.00 

10,424.00 
6,075.00 

8,384.00 
1,535.00 

2,520.00 
732.00 

31,619.00 
5,325.00 

14,200.00 
1,960.00 



249,330.00 
156,505.00 



44,219.00 
800.00 



70,553.00 
22,515.00 

70,691.00 
28,830.00 

34,177.00 
130,260.00 

100,000.00 

36,567.00 
1.630.00 



96 



Sewer 



Greater Lawrence 
Sanitation District 

Solid Waste 



Board of Health 

Greater Lawrence 
Community Drug Council 

Animal Inspection 

Veterans' Services 



Andover School 
Department 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Assistance 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$3,000.00 for out-of-state travel 



$38,681.00 
30,175.00 

51,459.00 



7,454.00 
271,950.00 

57,024.00 
10,008.00 

12,000.00 



600.00 

19,710.00 

1,051.00 

41,000.00 

7,127,000.00 
1.844.786.00 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to reduce School Department- 
Other Expenses by $5,000.00, the reduction to be applied to expense item Number 
1100 in the school budget. The intent being, to delete the $5,000.00 which would 
have been allocated for Special School Committee Legal Counsel. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to adjourn 
at 10:27 P. M. until Monday April 7, 1975 at 7:30 P. M. in the Memorial Auditorium 
on Bartlet Street. 



97 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1975 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 790 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator at 7:40 P. M. 

ARTICLE 4 - Cont'd. 



Regional Vocational School 
Library 



Recreation/Community 
Schools 



Water Department 
Spring Grove Cemetery 

Insurance 

Employee Benefits 

Patriotic and Civic Celebrations 

Veterans' Headquarters Rental 

Retirement 

Pension Fund 

Non-Contributory Pensions 

Damage to Persons and Property 

Debt Service Interest Expense 

Bond Issue Expense 

Bond Issue Redemptions 

Compensation Plan 

Reserve Fund ($93,000.00 
Overlay 
Reserve Fund) 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$150 for out-of-state travel 

less dog license reimbursements 

of $3,038.39 and Grants-In-Aid of 

$8,885.63 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. $350 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. 

$1,300 for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (less 

investment income of $12,000 and 

incl. $125 for out-of-state travel) 



$158,507.00 

284,681.00 
111,656.98 



93,866.00 
68,103.00 



207,268.00 
306,600.00 



45,383.00 
8,430.00 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



($27,000.00 Taxation 
Overlay Reserve Fund) 



TOTAL BUDGET to be raised by taxation 



138,000.00 

65,000.00 

7,452.00 

2,400.00 

5,696.00 
725.00 

306,838.00 

26,565.00 

2,000.00 

544,768.00 

2,000.00 

1,680,000.00 

160,000.00 

120.000.00 

$16,740,370.98 



98 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM TAXATION) 

ARTICLE 7 Storm Drains $100,000.00 

ARTICLE 13 Water Mains 11,400.00 

ARTICLE 21 Sewer (Red Spring Road) 12,000.00 

ARTICLE 22 Sewer (Harding Street) 15,000.00 

ARTICLE 25 Police Radios 2,800.00 

ARTICLE 36 MBTA (1975-76) 18,500.00 

ARTICLE 38 Pomps Pond Bath House 40,000.00 

ARTICLE 47 1973-74 Unpaid Bills 411.42 



Total SPECIAL ARTICLES to be raised by taxation $200,111.42 

SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS) 

ARTICLE 1 (Spec. T.M.) From Available Funds 94,200.00 

ARTICLE 2 (Spec. T.M.) Bicentennial Funds 17,000.00 

ARTICLE 6 (Spec. T.M.) MBTA Funds - January - June 1975 20,000.00 

ARTICLE 18 Conservation 18,891.25 



Total SPECIAL ARTICLES from available funds $150,091.25 

SPECIAL ARTICLE (STATE HOUSE NOTES) 

ARTICLE 14 Elm Street Water Main 140,000.00 

Grand 

Total Budget and Special Articles $17,230,573.65 

ARTICLE 4 Overlay Reserve to Reserve Fund 93,000.00 

ARTICLE 48 Unexpended appropriations and 23,945.60 
Free Cash to Surplus Revenue 

ARTICLE 49 Free Cash to Reduce 1975-76 Tax Rate $1,200,000.00 



99 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1975 in accordance with the provi- 
sions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1975 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter 
into a contract with the Department of Public Works and the County Commissioners for 
the construction and maintenance of public highways for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town Manger be authorizei 
to enter into contracts with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works and with the Essex County commissioners, with private contractors for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways using as funds, therefore, unexpend- 
ed funds appropriated under Chapter 90 of the General Laws and State and County 
funds made available under Chapter 90 and Chapter 765 of the Acts of 1972. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$100,000.00 for the purpose of installing Storm drains; and to authorize the Select- 
men to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise by taxation the sum of 
$100,000.00 for the purpose of installing road drains and authorize the Selectmen 
to acquire the necessary easements by purchase by gift or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain. 

The Vote-YES 652, NO — 15, voted by more than the 2/3 required 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED at 9:15 
P. M. to adjourn the regular Town Meeting and reconvene after action on the Special 
Town Meeting Warrant. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 7, 1975 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to dis- 
pense with the reading of the Warrant and return of Service of the Constable - and 
that the Moderator refer to the Articles by number and by subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town 
shall appropriate from available funds to supplement existing appropriations for 
the current fiscal year ending June 30, 1975. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town transfer from 
available funds the following sums of monies to supplement existing appropriations 
for the current fiscal year ending June 30, 1975. 

100 



Veterans Benefits $8,000.00 

Water - Other Expenses 51,000.00 

Sewer - Other Expenses 5,200.00 

School - Other Expenses 30,000.00 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $17,000.00 for the observance of the Nations Bicentennial. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 2 as printed 
in the warrant in the amount of $17,000.00 from available funds. 

ART I CLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to file, 
in behalf of the inhabitants of the Town and in conformity with Public Law 93-383, 
an application for funds in form and manner required by the United States Govern- 
ment, and to authorize the Town Manager to enter into contracts and expend funds in 
conformity with Public Law 93-383. 

Article 3 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws by adding the 
following Section To Article IV entitled "Matters involving Town Monies" of the 
Town By-Laws : 

Section 6. Estimate of Expenditures: The Town Manager shall 

in accordance with Section 15 of Chapter 571 of the 
Acts of 1956, which establishes the Charter for the 
Town of Andover, as amended by a vote of Town Meet- 
ing on April 1, 1974, submit his annual budget on or 
before the third Friday of January. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by adding to Article IV of the By-Laws a new Section to be numbered 6 to read as 
follows: 

Section 6. Estimate of Expenditures: The Town Manager in 
accordance with Section 15 of the Town Charter 
(Chapter 571 of the Acts of 1956) as amended by 
the votes of Town Meeting acting on Article 1 of 
the Special Town Meeting of March 26, 1973 and Article 
1, Question 1 of the Annual Town Meeting of March, 
1974, shall submit his annual budget on or before 
the third Friday of January of each year. 

Article 4 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 1, entitled, Annual 
Town Meeting date; Special Town Meetings: of Article II of the Town By-Laws by 
deleting from the first paragraph of said section the words: "First Monday of March" 
and insert in place thereof the following words: "Fourth Monday in March", so that 
the first paragraph of said section shall read as follows: "The Annual Town Meeting 
for the election of Town Officers and for other purposes shall be held on the fourth 
Monday of March in each year at such place or places within the Town as the Select- 
men may designate in their notice thereof." 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town vote to amend its 
By-Laws by deleting the word "first" from paragraph 1 of Section 1 of Article II of 
the Town By-Laws and inserting in place thereof the word "fourth". 

Article 5 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 

101 



Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act to authorize 
the Town of Andover to raise by taxation and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds or any combination of the foregoing, a sum in the amount of $20,000.00 to pay 
to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for passenger rail transportation 
provided during the periods of January 1, 1974 through November 17, 1974; November 
18, 1974 through April 7, 1975; and April 8, 1975 through June 30, 1975 and billed 
by said Authority to the Town. Said amount not to be expended unless the MBTA re- 
ceives the 50% reimbursement by the Commonwealth on behalf of the Town of Andover. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town transfer from avail- 
able funds the sum of $20,000.00. It was further voted that the Town authorize the 
Selectmen and Town Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special 
Act to authorize the Town of Andover to pay said sum to the MBTA for passenger rail 
transportation for the period of January 1, 1974 through June 30, 1975. Said sum 
not to be expended unless the MBTA receives the 50% reimbursement by the Common- 
wealth on behalf of the Town of Andover. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED that the 
Special Town meeting be adjourned Sine Di. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 7, 1975 

A RTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter 
into a contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority to provide 
passenger rail service to Andover, for the period commencing July 1, 1975 and to 
raise by taxation and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or any combination 
of the foregoing, the sum of $18,500.00 to pay to that Authority the net additional 
cost, if any, which may be owing pursuant to the contract for Town's fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1976; and to take any other actions relating thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 36 as printed 
in the warrant in the amount of $18,500.00 by taxation. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 10:31 P. M. until Monday April 14, 1975 at 7:30 P. M. in the Memorial 
Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 

ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 14, 1975 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 295 voters admitted to the 
meeting . 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniel s and duly seconded it was VOTED to adjourn 
at 8:15 P. M. until Tuesday April 15, 1975 at 7:30 P. M. in the Memorial Auditorium 
on Bartlet Street due to a lack of quorum. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 15, 1975 . 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 394 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator, at 8:00 P. M. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Athena Circle, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Definitive Plan, Andover, Mass., 
Owner, Chongris Bros., Inc., Engineer Hayes Engineering, Inc., Scale 1" =50', April 
1972" and said plan is recorded with Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6852. 
Plan and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

102 






on petition of Peter G. Gertsberger and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 8 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Delphi Circle, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Definitive Plan, Andover, Mass., 
Owner, Chongris Bros., Inc., Engineer Hayes Engineering, Inc., Scale 1" = 50', April 
1972" and said plan is recorded with Essex North Registry of Deeds as plan No. 6852. 
Plan and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Peter G. Gertsberger and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Olympia Way, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Definitive Plan, Andover, Mass., 
Owner Chongris Bros., Inc., Engineer Hayes Engineering, Inc., Scale 1" =50', April 
1972" and said plan is recorded with Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6852. 
Plan and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Peter G. Gertsberger and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 10 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Korinthian Way, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Definitive Plan, Andover, Mass., 
Owner, Chongris Bros., Inc., Engineer Hayes Engineering, Inc., Scale 1" = 50', April 
1972" and said plan is recorded with Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6852. 
Plan and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Peter G. Gertsberger and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 11 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Moderator to appoint a 
Committee of not fewer than five Andover Citizens to study the matter of redisrict- 
ing the Town. The committee shall made its report not later than the Annual Meeting, 
1976. 

on petition of Frederick P. Fitzgerald and others. 

Article 12 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $200,000.00 for the 
purpose of installing water mains in the following areas: 

Haverhill Street 12-inch 

103 



Elm Street or in easement 

between Burton Farm Road 

and Shipman Road 12-inch 

Gray Road 8-inch 

Salem Street 8-inch 

Reservation Road 12-inch 

High Street - Ballardvale 6-inch 

and to determine whether the same shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and to author- 
ize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 13 as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $11,400.00 by taxation. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds or by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropri- 
ate the sum of $140,000.00 for the purpose of installing a water main not larger 
than 12-inch in Elm Street. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise by borrowing the sum 
of $140,000.00 for the purpose of installing a water main not larger than 12" in Elm 
Street . 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

The vote — YES 327, NO 0--voted by more than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to delete Section 1A of Article 11 of 
the By-Laws. 

Article 15 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to rescind Art. II Sec. 3 of the By- 
Laws and substitute therefore the following: 

Sec. Quorum : Except as to such parts of the Annual Town Meeting as are devoted 
exclusively to the elections of Town Officers, 4% of the registered voters of the 
Town as of January 1st of the year in which the Town Meeting is held shall be 
necessary to constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at any Annual or 
Special Town Meeting, but less than a quorum may vote to adjourn indefinitely or to 
adjourn from time to time, and any business which might have been transacted at the 
meeting originally called may be transacted at an adjourned meeting. 

Article 16 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3 of Article II of the 
By-Laws -1966- to read: 

"No Quorum shall be necessary for the transaction of Busines at any 
Annual or Special Town Meeting". 

on petition of Frederick P. Fitzgerald and others. 
Article 17 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds to 

104 



Conservation Fund the sum of $18,891.25, this being the equivalent of the amount re- 
ceived from the Massachusetts Self-Help Program as follows: 

Self-Help #10, located in the vicinity of Haggetts Pond on Wood Hill Road, 9.6 
acres of mostly open land. Reimbursement share at 50% of this project is $8,216.25. 

Self-Help #11, located in the vicinity of Hussey's Brook, bordering Juniper Road, 
13.7 acres low, wooded wetland. Reimbursement share at 50% was $3,675.00. 

Self-Help #13, located on Wood Hill Road and abutting project #10, 10 acres 
wooded land. Reimbursement at 50% was $7,000.00. 

No money to be spent without the approval of the Board of Selectmen. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 18 as printed 
in the Warrant in the Amount of $18,891.25 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to acquire for conservation purposes under G. L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as 
amended, the fee in the following described parcels of land: 

Lot 4 Map 189, 17.5 acres 

Lot 64 and 65 of Map 190, 31.88 acres 

Lot 6 of Map 205, 3.81 acres 

All of the above parcels totalling 53.3 acres, more or less, are supposed to be 
owned by Forest Hills of Andover and are located on the westerly side of Fish Brook. 
Said acquisition shall be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund and only 
upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amended, the fee in the 
following described parcels of land: 

Lot 4, Map 189, 17.5 acres 

Lot 64 and 65 of Map 190, 31.88 acres 

Lot 6 of Map 205, 3.81 acres 

All of the above parcels totaling 53.3 acres, more or less are supposed to be 
owned by Forest Hills of Andover and are located on the westerly side of Fish Brook. 
Said acquisition shall be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund and only 
upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amend- 
ed, the fee in the following described parcel of land: 

All or part of Lot IB of Map 29, consisting of approximately 14.46 acres, located 
off Salem Street and supposed to be owned by James H. and Martha M. Booth, said 
acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund and only upon such 
terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

105 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amended, the fee in the 
following described parcels of land: 

All or part of Lot IB of Map 29, consisting of approximately 14.46 acres, located 
off Salem Street and supposed to be owned by James H. and Martha M. Booth, said 
acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund and only upon such 
terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $12,000.00 or any other 
sum, for the construction of a sanitary sewer, in Red Spring Road and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by taxation, by transfer of available 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 

21 as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $12,000.00 by taxation. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Voted by more than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $15,000.00 or any other- 
sum, for the construction of a sanitary sewer and lift station in Harding Street 
and to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by taxation, by transfer 
of available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 

22 as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $15,000.00 by taxation. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Voted by more than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town, by 
inserting the following as paragraph (a) of Article XII, Section 20, "Alcoholic 
Beverages": Drinking or possession of alcoholic beverages, as defined in Chapter 
138 of the Massachusetts General Laws, while in or upon any school building or 
school grounds, library grounds, park, playground or other municipal building or 
land is prohibited, except by written permission of the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Manager or Chief of Police. Whoever violates any provision of this section shall 
be fined an amount of not more than fifty dollars per each offense and to act on 
anything relating thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by inserting the following as paragraph (a) of Article XII, Section 20, "Alcoholic 
Beverages": Drinking or possession of alcoholic beverages, as defined in Chapter 
138 of the Massachusetts General Laws, while in or upon any school building or 
school grounds, library grounds, park, playground or other municipal building or 
land is prohibited, except by written permission of the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Manager or Chief of Police. Whoever violates any provision of this section shall be 
fined an amount of not more than fifty dollars per each offense and to act on any- 
thing relating thereto. 

Article 23 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town, by 
inserting the following as paragraph (b) of Article XII, Section 20, "Alcoholic 
Beverages": No person shall drink any alcoholic beverages, as defined in Chapter 

106 



138 of the Massachusetts General Laws, while on, in or upon any way in which the 
public has a right of access, or in any place to which members of the public have 
access as invitees or licensees, park or playground, or private land or place, with- 
out consent of the owner or person in control thereof. All alcoholic beverages 
being used in violaltion of this By-Law shall be seized and safely held until final 
adjudication of the charge against the person arrested or summoned before the court. 
Whoever violates any provision of this section shall be fined an amount of not more 
than fifty dollars per each offense and to act on anything relating thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by inserting the following as paragraph (b) of Article XII, Section 20, "Alcoholic 
Beverages": No person shall drink any alcoholic beverages, as defined in Chapter 
138 of the Massachusetts General Laws, while on, in or upon any way in which the 
public has a right of access, or in any place to which members of the public have 
access as invitees or licensees, park or playground, or private land or place, with- 
out censent of the owner or person in control thereof. All alcoholic beverages 
being used in violation of this By-Law shall be seized and safely held until final 
adjudication of the charge against the person arrested or summoned before the court. 
Whoever violates any provision of this section shall be fined an amount of not more 
than fifty dollars per each offense and to act on anything relating thereto. 

Article 24 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present . 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer 
from available funds $2,800.00 for new radios for the Police Department, said sum 
being Andover's share of a federal matching funds program for area improvement of 
police communications. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 25 as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $2,800.00 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act to exempt from 
the provisions of the General Laws Chapter 31 (Civil Service) positions in the 
Department of Public Works that are of a professional engineering or sub-profession- 
al engineering character including, but not limited to, Town Engineer, Assistant 
Town Engineer, Senior Engineering Aide, Junior Engineering Aide, Draftsman, and 
General Construction Inspector. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 26 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law (Article 
VIII) as follows: 

AMEND Section IV. B. (Table of Use Regulations) by changing the present Paragraph 
47 to 47a and adding a new Paragraph 47b to read as follows: 

47b. The use of a mobile home as a temporary dwelling on the site of a single 

family residence which has been destroyed or rendered uninhabitable by fire 
or other catastrophe; provided that a temporary permit for a period not to 
to exceed six (6) months is issued by the Building Inspector with the approval 
of the Director of the Board of Health and the Town Manager. If recon- 
struction of the original dwelling is not completed in six (6) months, such 
permit may be renewed for an additional six (6) months on concurrence of the 
above three persons, but in no event may such mobile home remain on the site 
in excess of one year. 

Designate "yes" in all districts except Apartment, Shopping Center and Office 
Park; designate "no" in these three districts. 

AMEND Section II. (Definitions) - Paragraph 13 by deleting the last three words 
"or tennis courts" from the definition. 

107 



AMEND Section V.B.2.C. (Dimensional Requirements-Exceptions and Special Require- 
ments) as follows: 

Delete the words in the first line of the Paragraph c. "on either side" 
and substitute therefor the words — "on both sides" 

on petition of Donald J. Mulvey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its Zoning 
By-Law (Article VIII) as follows: 

AMEND Section IV. B. (Table of Use Regulations) by changing the present Paragraph 
47 to 47a and adding a new Paragraph 47b to read as follows: 

47b. The use of a mobile home as a temporary dwelling on the site of a single 

family residence which has been destroyed or rendered uninhabitable by fire 
or other catastrophe: provided that a temporary permit for a period not to 
exceed six (6) months is issued by the Building Inspector with the approval 
of the Director of the Board of Health and the Town Manager. If recon- 
struction of the original dwelling is not completed in six (6) months, such 
permit may be renewed for an additional six (6) months on concurrence of the 
above three persons, but in no event may such mobile home remain on the site 
in excess of one year. 

Designate "yes" in all districts except Apartment, Shopping Center and 
Office Park; designate "no" in these three districts. 

AMEND Section II. (Definitions) - Paragraph 13 by deleting the last three words 
"or tennis courts" from the definition. 

AMEND Section V.B.2.C (Dimensional Requirements-Exceptions and Special Require- 
ments) as follows; 

Delete the words in the first line of the Paragraph c. "on either side" 
and substitute therefor the words — "on both sides" 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

The vote — YES 320, NO 9 — voted by more than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Section IV 
B30 (e) by adding the words "or registered vehicle" after the word vehicle so that 
Section IV B30 (e) shall read as follows: 

(e) Junk or scrap yard, which shall mean a lot used for the storage of any worn- 
out, cast-off, or discarded material ready for destruction or collected for 
salvage or conversion to some use. A lot containing more than one un- 
registered vehicle or registered vehicle not in condition for travel and 
stored in the open shall be considered to fall within this definition. The 
one motor vehicle permitted shall be stored so that it is not visible from 
any way or from any residential property or from any Office Park District 
which abuts the lot on which the motor vehicle is stored. 

upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously that the Town amend its 
Zoning By-Law, Section IV B30 (e) by adding the words "or registered vehicle" after 
the word vehicle so that Section IV B30 (e) shall read as follows: 

(e) Junk or scrap yard, which shall mean a lot used for the storage of any worn- 
out, cast-off, or discarded material ready for destruction or collected for 
salvage or conversion to some use. A lot containing more than one un- 
registered vehicle or registered vehicle not in condition for travel and 
stored in the open shall be considered to fall within this definition. The 
one motor vehicle permitted shall be stored so that it is not visible from 
any way or from any residential property or from any Office Park District 
which abuts the lot on which the motor vehicle is stored. 

108 



a written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

The vote was more than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law (Article 
(VIII), Section IV. B. (Table of Use Regulations) the second and third sentences of 
Paragraph 30. e. (Junk or Scrap), ("A lot containing. . .motor vehicle is stored"), 
and by adding a new Section VI. H. as follows: 

Section VI. 



H. Unregistered Motor Vehicles. No person shall permit more than one un- 
registered motor vehicle or trailer or major parts thereof, except for 
farm vehicles, to remain ungaraged on his premises at any time unless 
under a Class 1 or Class 2 license for sale of motor vehicles (Sec. 57- 
69, Ch. 140, G.L.), or unless given written authorization by the 
Selectmen following an investigation and report thereon by the Board of 
Health. Authorization shall be granted thereon if no hazard to health 
or safety is involved, and no unsightly condition visible from adjacent 
property or public ways are created. 

on petition of Donald J. Mulvey and others. 

Article 29 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to change the name of Railroad Street 
to Amici Avenue. 

on petition of Guy E. Nicolosi and others, 

Article 30 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under G. L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amend- 
ed, the fee in the following described parcel of land: 

Lot 11 of Map 197, 2.02 acres, located off Bellevue Road and supposed to be owned 
by Joseph T. Aubut and Walter A. Doucette, said acquisition to be made by ex- 
penditure from the Conservation Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of 
Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C, as amended, the fee in the 
following described parcels of land: 

Lot 11 of Map 197, 2.02 acres, located off Bellevue Road and supposed to be owned 
by Joseph T. Aubut and Walter A. Doucette, said acquisition to be made by ex- 
penditure from the Conservation Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of 
Selectmen shall approve. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amended, 
the fee in the following described parcel of land: 

All or part of Lot 2 of Map 107, consisting of approximately 13.31 acres, sup- 
posed to be owned by Christopher L. and Adeline M. Muller, located off High Plain 
Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund and only 
upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

109 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amended, the following 
described parcels of land: 

All or part of Lot 2 of Map 107, consisting of approximately 13.31 acres, sup- 
posed to be owned by Christopher L. and Adeline M. Muller, located off High Plain 
Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund and only 
upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, as 
amended, the fee in the following described parcel of land: 

All or part of Lot 18, Assessors' Map 132, consisting of approximately 17.24 
acres, supposed to be owned by the Curtis Development Corporation, located off 
High Plain Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation 
Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C, as amended, the following de- 
scribed parcels of land: 

All or part of Lot 18, Assessors' Map 132, consisting of approximately 17.24 
acres, supposed to be owned by the Curtis Development Corporation, located off 
High Plain Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation 
Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, or any combination of the foregoing, the sum of 
$6,516.40 to pay to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority the net addition- 
al cost billed by that Authority to Andover for passenger rail service to the Town 
for the period January 1, 1974 through June 30, 1974. 

Article 34 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, or any combination of the foregoing, (1) the sum of 
$8,500.00 to pay to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority the net addition- 
al cost, if any, which may be billed by that Authority to Andover for passenger rail 
service to the Town for the period July 1, 1974 through December 31, 1974; and (2) 
the sum of $8,000.00 to pay such net additional cost, if any, to that Authority 
which may be billed by it to Andover for passenger rail service to the Town for the 
six-month period January 1, 1975 through June 30, 1975, pursuant to a contract for 
that six-month period between the Authority and the Town, which contract the Town 
Manager is by this vote authorized to enter into; and to take any other action re- 
lating thereto. 

Article 35 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 36. See Page 13 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to change the following described 
parcel of land from Industrial D to Office Park District; namely, being Lot 29 as 
shown on Assessors' Map 179, bounded and described substantially as follows: 

Westerly by the easterly line of Frontage Road four hundred 
thirty and 08/100 (430.08) feet: 

Northerly by Lot One (1) as shown on plan here inafter mentioned 

110 



three hundred forty (340) feet; 

Easterly four hundred thirty and 08/100 (430.08) feet; and 

Southerly five hundred two and 65/100 (502.65) feet, and 

Southerly again twenty (20) feet by the westerly, northerly 
and northerly lines of a State Highway, Route 93, no access. 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Court to be located as shown on Plan 
No. 30282B, drawn by Andover Engineers, Inc., dated October 1962, as modified and 
approved by the Court, filed in the Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of 
which is filed with Certificate of Title No. 5325, Book 36, Page 101. 

on petition of Donald J. Mulvey and others. 

Article 37 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer 
from available funds $40,000.00 to supplement an appropriation made under Article 31 
of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting, for the purpose of constructing a bath house at 
Pomps Pond. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 38 as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $40,000.00 by taxation, provided that no funds be 
expended prior to receipt of written approval from the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation 
or other State or Eederal Agency providing financial reimbursement. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 

available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 

$9,500.00 for the purpose of improving traffic circulation at Recreation Park, Abbot 
Street . 

Article 39 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name that 
portion of Bridle Path Road lying westerly of Landau Lane as approved by the 
Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Plan of Revision of Part of Carriage Chase, May 25, 1973" 
which plan is recorded with North District of Essex Registry 
of Deeds as Plan Number 6971. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Article 40 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
TALLY HO Lane as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Select- 
men as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision and acceptance plan, Carriage Chase, May 27, 1966" 
which plan is recorded with North District of Essex Registry 
of Deeds as Plan No. 5590. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Article 41 was withdrawn. 

ft 
111 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Whiffletree Circle as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision and acceptance plan Whiffletree Circle 
subdivider: Wyncrest Associates of Andover , December 
10, 1973" which plan is recorded with North District 
of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6997. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Article 42 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws by adding the 
following : 

14 A Revaccination 

1. All owners and keepers of a dog over six months old shall cause said dog to 
be vaccinated or revaccinated by a Licensed Veterinarian with anti rabies 
vaccine within two years prior to the date of application for a dog license. 

2. Application for each annual dog license shall be accompanied by proof of 
vaccination of the dog against rabies within two years preceeding the date 
of the application. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by inserting the following new Section between the present Sections 15 and 16, 
Section 16 Vaccination : 

1. Every owner and keeper of a dog more than six months old shall cause said dog 
to be vaccinated or revaccinated by a Licensed Veterinarian with anti rabies 
vaccine within two years prior to the date of application for a dog license 
for said dog. 

2. Application for each annual dog license shall be accompanied by proof of 
vaccination of the dog against rabies within two years preceeding the date of 
the application. 

and then renumbering the present Section 16 as 18. 

Article 43 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present . 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 12 of the By-Laws by 
adding the following section: 

14B - Fees The fee for every license shall be four dollars for a male dog, six 

dollars for a female dog, and four dollars for a spayed female. Said fees 
are subject to all other conditions as set forth in G.L. Chapter 140, Sec. 
139. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by inserting the following new Section between the present Sections 15 and 16. 

Section 17 - Fees 

1. The fees for dog licenses shall be as follows: 
$4.00 for a male dog, and $6.00 for a female 
dog, unless the female dog has been spayed, 
in which case the fee shall be $4.00. Said 

112 



fees are subject to all other conditions as 
set forth in MGLA , Chapter 140, Section 139. 

and then renumbering the present Section 17 as 19. 

Article 45 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present . 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws by adding the 
following paragraph to Section 13 of the By-Laws. 

d) All dogs must be restrained during trash pick-up time in the areas in which 
the owner or keeper resides. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend Article XII 
of the By-Laws by adding to Section 13 of Article XII a new sub-section (d) as 
follows : 

(d) All dogs must be restrained during trash pick-up time in the general areas 
in which their owners or keepers reside. For purposes of this Section, the 
"trash pick-up time" for a given street shall be from 7:00 a.m. until 5:00 
p.m. on the days said street is scheduled for trash collection in accordance 
with the published schedule which is on file in the Town Clerk's Office." 

Article 44 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws as follows: 

To strike out Section 14 and substitute therefore the following: 

Penalty 

The Town may make application for a complaint in a District Court having 
jurisdiction for violation of any of the provisions of Section 11, 13, 14A, 
and 14B of said By-Laws. 

The penalty for violation of any provision of Section 11,13C, 14A and 14B, 
shall be a fine of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars for each offense. 

The penalty for violation of said sections or any of the sub-sections shall be 
a fine of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars for each offense. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article XII of the Town By- 
Laws by striking out the present Section 14 and inserting in place thereof the 
following new Section 14: 

"Section 14. Penalties: 



1. Upon violation of any provision of Sections 11, 12 or 13 of Article XII of 
this By-Law, the Town may make application for a complaint to issue from a 
District Court having jurisdiction as a result of such violation. 

2. The penalty for violation of any provision of Sections 11, 12 or 13 of 
Article XII of these By-Laws, shall be a fine of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars 
for each offense" 

Article 46 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present . 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed $1,000.00 to pay unpaid bills for 

113 



which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously that the Town raise 
and appropriate by taxation the sum of $411.42 to pay the following 1973-74 unpaid 
bills: 

Massachusetts Mathematic League $75.00 

(Annual League dues for 1973-74 

The Bernardin Insurance Agency 63.00 

(Additional Premium on Workmen's 
Compensation policy for the calender 
year of 1973) 

Andover Consumer Cooperative, Inc. 29.93 

Cambridge Book Co. 243.49 



$411.42 

Voted by more than the 4/5 required, A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 48. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following balances be 
lapsed and returned to Surplus Revenue. 

Schools 

Article 47 1972 Plans Doherty and Shawsheen Schools $ 454.10 
Article 44 1973 Bancroft School Sprinkler System 2,113.86 

Water 

Article 23 1970 Bancroft Rd . , Pumping Station 250.00 

Article 21 1972 Update Water System 375.24 

Article 24 1973 Painting Storage Tanks 1,241.35 

Article 61 1973 Water Mains, Lowell Jet. 368.81 

Miscellaneous 

Article 13A 1972 Construction Outlet, Hemlock Pond 1,065.00 

Article 23 1971 Regional Refuse Disposal 3,000.00 

Article IB 1972 Traffic Lights Lowell Street, 8,000.00 

Greenwood Road 

Article 17 1974 School Zone Signs 7,077.24 






$23,945.60 



ARTICLE 49. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use 
in free cash to reduce the 1975-76 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at 
the 1975 Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Assessors be permitted 
to use $1,200,000.00 in Free Cash to reduce the 1975 tax rate and to offset appro- 
priations voted at the 1975 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws by adding the 
following Section to Article XII. 

114 



Sec. 18 - The Tenant, occupant, or owner of any building on land bordering on 
any street or way where there is a sidewalk or canopy, in the below delineated 
areas in the Town of Andover, shall within 24 hours after the ceasing to fall of 
any snow, cause the same to be removed from the sidewalk or the canopy. 

A. Both sides of Main Street between Elm Square and Punchard Avenue. 

B. North side of Elm Street between Main Street and a point 51 feet westerly of 
Elm Court. 

C. South side of Elm Street between Post Office Avenue and a point 232 feet 
easterly of Post Office Avenue. 

D. North side of Park Street between Main Street and a point 344 feet easterly 
of Main Street. 

E. South side of Barnard Street between Main Street and Bartlet Street. 

F. North side of Chestnut Street and a point 163 feet easterly of Main Street. 

G. North side of Essex Street between Main Street and a point 325 feet westerly 
of Main Street. 

H. South side of Essex Street between Central Street and a point 360 feet west- 
erly of Central Street . 

I. South side of Chestnut Street and a point 125 feet easterly of Main Street. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by adding the following Section to Article XII. 

Sec. 20 - The Tenant, occupant, or owner of any building on land bordering on any 

street or way where there is a sidewalk or canopy, in the below delineated areas 

in the Town of Andover, shall within 24 hours after the ceasing to fall of any 
snow, cause the same to be removed from the sidewalk or the canopy. 

A. Both sides of Main Street between Elm Square and Punchard Avenue. 

B. North side of Elm Street between Main Street and a point 51 feet westerly of 
Elm Court . 

C. South side of Elm Street between Post Office Avenue and a point 232 feet 
easterly of Post Office Avenue. 

D. North side of Park Street between Main Street and a point 344 feet easterly 
of Main Street . 

E. South side of Barnard Street between Main Street and Bartlet Street. 

F. North side of Chestnut Street and a point 163 feet easterly of Main Street. 

G. North side of Essex Street between Main Street and a point 325 feet westerly 
of Main Street . 

H. South side of Essex Street between Central Street and a point 360 feet west- 
erly of Central Street. 

I. South side of Chestnut Street and a point 125 feet easterly of Main Street. 

Article 50 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present . 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amend- 

115 



ed, the fee in the following described parcels of land: 

Lot 60 of Map 83, 2.76 acres 

Lot 62 of Map 83, 27,140 square feet 

Lot 64 of Map 83, 1/4 acre 

Lot 64A of Map 83, 1 acre 

Lot 65 of Map 83, 1 acre, more or less 

All of these parcels are supposed to be owned by Peter R. Christy and are located 
off Boston Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation 
Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C, as amended, the following 
described parcels of land: 

Lot 60 of Map 83, 2.76 acres 

Lot 62 of Map 83, 27,140 square feet 

Lot 64 of Map 83, 1/4 acre 

Lot 64A of Map 83, 1 acre 

Lot 65 of Map 83, 1 acre, more or less 

All of these parcels are supposed to be owned by Peter R. Christy and are located 
off Boston Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Conservation 
Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C , as amend- 
ed, the fee in the following described parcels of land: 

Lot 58 of Map 83, 164,967 square feet, supposed to be owned by Douglas Morton, 
located off Boston Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Con- 
servation Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to enter into contractual agreement with the Department of Natural Re- 
sources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Self-Help Funding to acquire for 
conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, Sec. 8C, as amended, the following de- 
scribed parcels of land: 

Lot 58 of Map 83, 164,967 square feet, supposed to be owned by Douglas Morton, 
located off Boston Road, said acquisition to be made by expenditure from the Con- 
servation Fund and only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen shall approve. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdiction and 
control of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in G.L. Chapter 40, 
Sec. 8C, as amended, the following described land now owned by the Town of Andover: 

Lot 42 of Map 83, 1 acre, off Rattlesnake Hill Road 

Lot 42A of Map 83, 1.25 acres, off Rattlesnake Hill Road 

116 



Lot 42B of Map 83, 2 acres, off Old County Road 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 
53 as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws by inserting after 
Section 18 of Article XII of the By-Laws a new Section 19 to read as follows: 

Section 19. Soliciting: 

A. No person, either principal or agent, whether or not that person is licensed 
as a transient vendor, hawker, or peddler by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
under Chapter 101 of the General Laws or otherwise, shall go to any dwelling 
place or residence within the Town soliciting or taking orders for any goods, 
wares, merchandise, property of any kind or services of any nature, for 
future or immediate delivery or performance, within the Town of Andover, with- 
out having first registered with the Chief of Police and having received a 
Solicitor Registration Card. 

The Chief of Police, following application by such person shall, if satisfied 
with the honesty of the applicant, issue a Solicitor Registration Card to 
that person for a period not to exceed twelve (12) months. Said card must be 
carried by each solicitor whenever soliciting or taking orders for goods as 
provided in the preceeding paragraph, and it must be shown on request. The 
Chief of Police may for cause, and after providing the opportunity for a 
hearing, order any such person who has been issued a Solicitor Registration 
Card to surrender that card to him. 

B. No such person shall in any event engage in any such soliciting or taking of 
orders except during the hours between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the Town By-Laws by in- 
serting after Section 20 of Article XII of the By-Laws a new Section 21 to read as 
follows : 

Section 21. Soliciting: 

A. No person, either principal or agent, whether or not that person is licensed 
as a transient vendor, hawker, or peddler by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
under Chapter 101 of the General Laws or otherwise, shall go to any dwelling 
place or residence within the Town soliciting or taking orders for any goods, 
wares, merchandise, property of any kind or services of any nature, for 
future or immediate delivery or performance, within the Town of Andover, 
without having first registered with the Chief of Police and having received 

a Solicitor Registration Card. 

The Chief of Police, following application by such person shall, if satisfied 
with the honesty of the applicant, issue a Solicitor Registration Card to 
that person for a period not to exceed twelve (12) months. Said card must be 
carried by each solicitor whenever soliciting or taking orders for goods as 
provided in the preceeding paragraph, and it must be shown on request. The 
Chief of Police may for cause, and after providing the opportunity for a 
hearing, order any such person who has been issued a Solicitor Registration 
Card to surrender that card to him. 

B. No such person shall in any event engage in any such soliciting or taking of 
orders except during the hours between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. 

Article 54 passed by a majority vote. 

A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will direct the Moderator to appoint a committee 

117 



to investigate the desirability and the possibility of constructing a Civic and 
Cultural Center in Andover. 

on petition of Frederick P. Fitzgerald and others. 

Article 55 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to increase the membership of the 
School committee from 5 to 7 members to become effective in the following manner: 

In 1976- Four members to be elected, two of whom will serve a term of two years, 
and two serve a term of one year, the two members receiving the least number of 
votes of those elected on the day of election shall serve one year: 

1977- Four members to be elected for a term of two years; 

1978- Three members to be elected for a term of two years. 

and thereafter, four and three members to be elected on alternative years, all for 
terms of two years. 

on petition of Irving L. Newman and others. 

Article 56 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 20D of Chapter 90 of 
the General Laws relative to the mutilation of parking tickets. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 57 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 58 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to 
appoint a Town Center Study Committee to work in collaboration with the Planning 
Board, said Committee to be chaired by a member selected by and from the Planning 
Board; said Committee to develop a strategy for Town Center improvements, including 
study of a downtown bypass or alternative traffic improvements, need for off-street 
parking and better utilization of existing parking facilities, and any other actions 
deemed necessary to help the Town Center to better serve residents; said Committee 
to prepare a report, together with any proposed implementing articles, to be sub- 
mitted to the Selectmen not later than December 31, 1975. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Article 58 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 59 . To act upon the report of the TOWN OFFICERS. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town accept the Supple- 
mentary report published February 20, 1975 in the Andover Townsman which includes 
the activities of various boards and departments for the year 1974. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 10: 00 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



ELDEN R. SALTER 
TOWN CLERK 



118 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 6, 1975 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on September 8, 1975, the Inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and assembled in 
the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Monday, the sixth day of October, 1975 
at 7:30 P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator at 7:35 P.M. 

Check Lists were used at the entrance and showed 551 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The opening prayer was offered by the Rev. J. Lawrence Vaughan of Christ Church 
in Andover. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George Heseltine. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the auditorium. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 18 non-voters to the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the reading of the Warrant 
and the return of Service of the Constable be dispensed wi+h, and that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number. 



Essex, SS . October 1, 1975 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 



Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name that 
portion of Bridle Path Road lying westerly of Landau Lane as approved by the Plan- 
ning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Plan of Revision of Part of Carriage Chase, 
May 25, 1973" which plan is recorded with 
North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as 
Plan Number 6971, 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 1, as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

119 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Tally Ho Lane as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Select- 
men as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision and acceptance plan, Carriage Chase, 
May 27, 1966", which plan is recorded with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 
5590. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on 
file with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 2, as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Whiffletree Circle as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision and acceptance plan Whiffletree Circle 
subdivider : Wyncrest Associates of Andover, Decem- 
ber 10, 1973" which plan is recorded with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
6997. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 3, as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
"Ivanhoe Lane" a certain road approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan, dated August 15, 1966, entitled "Sub- 
division Plan of Abbott Orchards in Andover, Massachusetts made for DeSalvo Con- 
struction", which plan was prepared by Surveyor Clinton F. Goodwin, was recorded in 
the Northern District of Essex County Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 5555 and, along 
with the necessary deed, is on file with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Salvatore DeSalvo and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 4, as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Cardinal Lane as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Select- 
men as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision and acceptance plan, "Dascomb 
Estates", drawn by Albert A. Miller and 
Wilbur Nylander of Lexington, Massachusetts, 
dated April 16, 1970, which plan is recorded 
with North District of Essex Registry of 
Deeds as Plan Number 6235." 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town accept Cardinal 

120 



Lane as approved by the Planning Board and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen on 
September 8, 1975, and as shown on a plan recorded with the North Essex Registry of 
Deeds on Plan No. 6235. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 
appropriate the sum of $4,000 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred 
in the fiscal year beginning January 1, 1973 and ending June 30, 1974, and in the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 1974 and ending June 30, 1975. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from 
available funds and appropriate the sum of $3,959.68 to pay the following unpaid 
bills for which obligation was incurred in the fiscal year beginning with January 
1, 1973 and ending June 30, 1974, and the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1974 and 
ending June 30, 1975: 

TOWN 

Union Petroleum Corp. - Invoice #29, Feb. 28 $ 444.49 

Town Hall 

Camp, Dresser & McKee, Inc. 1,950.67 

Inspection Services April & May 1974 

Andover Inn 37.04 

Meals for Selectmen - Dec. '74 & Jan. '75 

Cyr Oil Company 64.73 

Andover Small Engine Service, Inc. 14.05 

SCHOOL 

Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc. 314.26 

Joseph A. Furnari 568.85 

McVey's Flowers 50.00 

Gestetner 3.90 

Grecoe 5 . 60 

Look Photo 53.82 

F. H. Noyes 17.50 

Doyle Lumber 253.21 

Elizabeth Serbagi 80.95 

Rand McNally & Company 100.61 



$3,959.68 



Voted more than 9/10 vote as required. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and 

appropriate the sum of $9,500.00 to purchase the following equipment for the Andover 

Police Department: One (1) replacement for the 1972 Cushman Police Vehicle; One 
(1) radar machine, speed-gun type; and Four (4) short-wave radios. 



121 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds 
and appropriate the sum of $9,250.00 to purchase the following equipment for the 
Andover Police Department: 

One (1) replacement for the 1972 Cushman Police Vehicle. 

One (1) radar machine, speed-gun type and 

Four (4) short wave radios. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to establish an Industrial Development 
Financing Authority for industrial development purposes, pursuant to Chapter 40D of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, and make the appropriate findings and declarations 
or take any other action with respect thereto. 

Inserted at the request of the Industrial Development Commission. 

Article 8 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to file i] 
behalf of the inhabitants of the Town and in conformity with Public Law 93-383, an 
application for funds in form and manner required by the United States Government. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed; 
in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $235,000.00 
from available funds or by borrowing for the purpose of providing construction plansj 
and specifications for the improvement of the water distribution system and the 
building of a storage reservoir. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the 
sum of $168,700 for construction plans and specifications for water mains and a new 
storage reservoir at Prospect Hill as recommended by the town's master plan for im- 
provements to the water distribution system dated December, 1972 and to meet that 
appropriation the town treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be authorized tc 
borrow the sum of $168,700 and to issue bonds and notes thereof. 

The vote — YES 504, NO — 6 voted by more than the 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way 
Paulornette Circle, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, 
Andover, Massachusetts", by Charles E. Cyr , C.E., recorded in the North Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6292. 

on petition of Peter Mullett and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 11 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town of Andover will accept as a public way, Donna 
Road, as approved by the Planning Board. 

For title, see Land Court Certificate 

5638. Land Court Book 38, Page 153. For 

plan see "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan" 

"Morningside" Subdivider "Magee Construction 

Co., Inc.", Engineer "Fred A. Joyce" Dated 

Feb. 10, 1964 Scale, 1" = 40' recorded in 

Essex County North District Land Registration 

Office in Land Court Book 38, page 153. 

For further description see Land Court Plan 32408A. 

122 



Copies of said plan and description of said road being on file with the Town 
Clerk. 

on petition of John E. Magee , Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 12 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Selectmen, Board of 
Health, or other officers having charge thereof to enter into a separate contract 
for the collection and disposal of garbage in the Town of Andover at the most advan- 
tageous cost to the Town. 

on petition of Stanley J. Niebrzydowski and others. 

Article 13 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept a portion of High Plain Road, 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Plan of 
a portion of High Plain Road", Town of Andover, Massachusetts, Scale 1" = 40', May, 
1975, John Avery, Jr. , Town Engineer, as recorded in the North Essex Registry of 
Deeds, as Plan No. 7259. 

Said portion lies between the 1960 relocation of High Plain Road over 1-495 and 
the intersection of High Plain Road and Cross Street. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town accept, that portion 
of High Plain Road lying between the 1960 relocation of High Plain Road over 1-495 
and the intersection of High Plain Road and Cross Street as laid out by the Select- 
men on September 8, 1975, and as shown on a plan recorded in the North Essex Regis- 
try of Deeds on Plan No. 7259. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, a sum of 
money for the purpose of widening High Plain Road, and to authorize the Selectmen 
to acquire the necessary land therefore, by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Selectmen be authorized 
to acquire by purchase, by gift, by seizure by right of eminent domain the necessary 
land and easements for the purpose of widening High Plain Road and that the sum of 
$1.00 be transferred from available funds to pay any damages incurred by eminent 
domain procedures. 

The Vote — YES 508, NO — 4 voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept a portion of Cross Street as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Plan of a 
portion of Cross Street, Town of Andover, Massachusetts, Scale 1" =40', May, 1975, 
John Avery, Jr. , Town Engineer, as recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds, as 
Plan No. 7260. 

Said portion lies northerly of its intersection with High Plain Road for a dis- 
tance of some 1900 feet. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town accept that por- 
tion of Cross Street lying northerly of its intersection with High Plain Road for 
a distance of some 1900 feet as laid out by the Selectmen on September 8, 1975 and 
as shown on a plan recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7260. 

123 



A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, a sum of 
money for the purpose of widening Cross Street, and to authorize the Selectmen to 
acquire the necessary land therefore, by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Selectmen 
be authorized to acquire by purchase, by gift, by seizure by right of eminent domain 
the necessary land and easements for the purpose of widening Cross Street and that 
the sum of $1.00 be transferred from available funds to pay any damages incurred by 
eminent domain procedures. 

Voted by more than the 2/3 as required. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, land in the 
Town of Andover identified as Lots #68, #69 and #72 on Assessors' Map No. 55, to- 
gether with the buildings thereon, and further to see if the Town will vote to 
transfer from available funds and appropriate a sum of money for said acquisition. 






Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town authorize the Boarc 
of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain, land in the Town of Andover identified as lots 68, 69 and 72 on Assessors' 
Map No. 55 together with buildings thereon; and further to appropriate the sum of 
$161,000 for said acquisition and to meet this appropriation transfer from available 
funds the sum of $7,183.05 and transfer the unexpended balances of the following 
appropriations voted at previous Town Meetings: 

Article 1 - 1966 Town Meeting $16,687.18 

Article 15 - 1970 Town Meeting $92,129.77 

Article 37 - 1972 Town Meeting $45,000.00 

The Vote YES — 525, NO — 9 voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. Keck. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws by deleting 
Article VII and substituting the following Article: VII. 

Article VII. 

Construction Permit Fees 

A. Building Permits 

Fees for the issuance of permits, as indicated in this section, shall be paid by 
the applicant. The amount of the fees shall be determined as follows: 

BUILDING PERMITS (type) COST OF PERMITS 



New Buildings. All types from $35.00 for the first $15,000 

6' X 6' X 7' and larger. $3.00 per thousand over 

$15,000 on the estimated cost. 

Minimum fee of $35.00 on dwellings. 

Additions & Alterations $3.00 per thousand. $3.00 minimum. 

Swimming Pools $3.00 per thousand. $6.00 Minimum. 

124 



BUILDING PERMITS 



(type) 



COST OF PERMITS 



Raze 

Move Permits (structure) 

Elevators - Installations, repairs, 
alterations 

Signs 

Re- Inspect ions 

Air-Conditioning - except units 
included under original 
building permit. 

Heating Alteration 

Change of Ownership permits 

Permit Renewals 

Day Care Centers 

Renewal of Stop Work Orders 

Amusement Parks, Equipment, Tents, etc. 

Requested Inspections Existing Buildings 



$3 . 00 per permit . 
$10.00 per permit. 
$3.00 per thousand 



$6 . 00 minimum. 



$3.00 per thousand. $6.00 minimum. 

$10.00 per inspection, minimum. 

$4.00 per thousand. 
$8 . 00 minimum. 

$4.00 per thousand. $8.00 minimum. 

$25.00 per permit. 

$10.00 

$25.00 per permit annually. 

$10.00 per permit. 

$10.00 per unit. 

$25.00 



All Other Inspections Under Massachusetts As Noted: Table 1-1 Mass. Basic Code 
State Building Code 

B. Electrical Permits 

Fees for the issuance of permits, as indicated in this section, shall be paid 
by the applicant. The amount of the fees shall be determined as follows: 



ELECTRICAL PERMITS 



(type) 



COST OF PERMITS 



RESIDENTIAL 

New Dwellings (one meter) 

Multiple Occupancy Dwellings (apts.) 

Alterations of Dwellings or part of 

One meter service up to 200 amp. 

Service over 200 amp. 

Multiple Meter Service 

Underground Service 

Addition to Dwellings up to 10 outlets 

Addition to Dwelling over 10 outlets 

Fire Alarm System (other than new homes) 

Swimming Pool - Above Ground 



$10.00 

$10.00 plus $5 for each unit over two. 

$10.00 

$10.00 

$2.00 per 100 amp. 

$5. 00 per meter 

$5.00 

$5.00 

$5.00 plus 25£ per outlet 

$5.00 

$10.00 



125 



Swimming Pool - Inground (requires two 

inspections ) 
Temporary Service 

Others (washers, dryers, water heaters, 
oil burners, machine tools, re- 
inspections, renewals, etc.) 

COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL 

New Buildings - up to 10 outlets 
Each additional outlet over 10 outlets 

Alteration to existing buildings 
Each additional outlet over 10 outlets 



$15.00 
$10.00 
$5.00 minimum fee 






$20.00 

$ .50 

$15.00 
$ .50 



$10.00 

$10.00 per meter 

$3.00 per 100 amp. over 



One meter service up to 200 amp. 

Multiple meter service up to 400 amp. 

400 amp. service and above 

Signs (must be inspected before installed) $10.00 

Air-Conditioning per ton $1.00 

Industrial and Manufacturing plants who employ electricians full-time, must pay a 
flat rate of $50.00 per year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by deleting Article VII and substituting the following Article: 

Article VII. 

Construction Permit Fees 

A. Building Permits 

Fees for the issuance of permits, as indicated in this section, shall be paid by 
the applicant. The amount of the fees shall be determined as follows: 



BUILDING PERMITS 



(type) 



COST OF PERMITS 



New Buildings. All types from 
6 ' X 6* X 7* and larger. 



Additions & Alterations 

Swimming Pools 

Raze 

Move Permits (structure) 

Elevators - Installations, repairs, 
alterations 

Signs 

Re- Inspect ions 

Air-Conditioning - except units 



$35.00 for the first $15,000 

$3.00 per thousand over $15,000 on the 

estimated cost. Minimum fee of $35.00 

on dwellings. 



$3.00 per thousand 
$3.00 per thousand. 
$3.00 per permit. 
$10.00 per permit. 
$3.00 per thousand. 



$3.00 minimum. 
$6. 00 minimum. 



$6. 00 minimum. 



$3.00 per thousand. $6.00 minimum. 
$10.00 per inspection, minimum. 
$4.00 per thousand. $8.00 minimum. 



126 



included under original building permit 

Heating Alteration $4.00 per thousand. $8.00 minimum. 

Change of Ownership permits $25.00 per permit. 

Permit Renewals $10.00 

Day Care Centers $25.00 per permit annually. 

Renewal of Stop Work Orders $10.00 per permit. 

Amusement Parks, Equipment, Tents, etc. $10.00 per unit. 

Requested Inspections Existing Buildings $25.00 

All Other Inspections Under Massachusetts As Noted: Table 1-1 Mass. Basic Code 
State Building Code 



B. 



Electrical Permits 



Fees for the issuance of permits, as indicated in the section, shall be paid 
by the applicant. The amount of the fees shall be determined as follows: 



ELECTRICAL PERMITS 



(type) 



COST OF PERMITS 



RESIDENTIAL 

New Dwellings (one meter) 

Multiple Occupancy Dwellings (apts) 

Alterations of Dwellings or part of 

One meter service up to 200 amp. 

Service over 200 amp. 

Multiple Meter Service 

Underground Service 

Addition to Dwellings up to 10 outlets 

Addition to Dwelling over 10 outlets 



$10.00 

$10.00 plus $5.00 for each unit over two 

$10.00 

$10.00 

$2.00 per 100 amp. 

$5.00 per meter 

$5.00 

$5.00 

$5.00 plus 25£ per outlet 



Fire Alarm System (other than new homes) $5.00 



Swimming Pool - Above Ground 

Swimming Pool - Inground (requires two 

inspections) 

Temporary Service 

Others (washers, dryers, water heaters, 
oil burners, machine tools, re-inspect- 
ions, renewals, etc.) 

COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL 

New Buildings - up to 10 outlets $20.00 

Each additional outlet over 10 outlets $ .50 

Alteration to existing buildings $15.00 

127 



$10.00 
$15.00 

$10.00 

$5.00 minimum fee 



Each additional outlet over 10 outlets $ .50 

One meter service up to 200 amp, $10.00 

Multiple meter service up to 400 amp. $10.00 per meter 

400 amp. service and above $3.00 per 100 amp. over 

Signs (must be inspected before installed) $10. 00 

Air-Conditioning per ton $1.00 

Industrial and Manufacturing plants who employ electricians full-time, must pay a 
flat rate of $50.00 per year. 

Article 19 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws by striking out 
Article IX, entitled Plumbing By-Law. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by striking out Article IX, entitled Plumbing By-Law. 

Article 20 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws by deleting the 
following paragraphs: 

Article I. Section 3 (a), paragraphs 3 and 4, which are references to the Plumb- 
ing By-Law and the Building Code By-Law. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-Laws 
by deleting the following paragraphs: 

Article I. Section 3 (a), paragraphs 3 and 4, which are references to the Plumb- 
ing By-Law and the Building Code By-Law. 

Article 21 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town as 
follows : 

By striking out the amount "$50.00" in the 
last line of Section 4 of Article 1, and 
inserting in place thereof, the amount 
"$200.00". 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend the By-Laws 
of the Town as follows: 

By striking out the amount "$50.00 in the 
last line of Section 4 of Article 1, and 
inserting in place thereof, the amount 
"$200.00". 

Article 22 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-Law Section VIII 
A., entitled "Enforcement", by striking out the entire section VIII. A. and sub- 
stituting therefore the following: 

A. Enforcement 

This By-Law shall be administered by the Inspector of Buildings and all local 

128 



Building Inspectors, appointed by the Town Manager. No building shall hereafter be 
built or altered and no use of land requiring a building permit shall be begun or 
changed without a permit having been issued by him. No building so built or altered 
shall be occupied until a certificate of occupancy as required by the State Building 
Code Sec. 120.1 has been issued by him. 

Applications for building permits shall be accompanied by a plot plan of the lot 
in duplicate, drawn to scale, showing the actual dimensions of the lot and the exact 
location and size of the buildings already upon the lot and of the building or 
structure to be erected, together with ways on and adjacent to the lot. A record of 
such applications and plot plans shall be kept on file in the office of the Inspector 
of Buildings. 

Any person violating any of the provisions of this By-Law may be restrained as 
provided by law. 

If any Board, agency, or official or resident of the Town shall complain in writ- 
ing to the Inspector of Buildings that a provision or provisions of this Zoning By- 
Law are being violated, identifying the violation or violations he believes to exist 
and the person or party in violation, the Inspector of Buildings shall investigate 
such complaint and shall respond to the complainant ruling that a violation does or 
does not exist. Failure of the Inspector of Buildings to so respond within thirty 
days (30) after receipt of such complaint shall be deemed a ruling or decision by 
him that no violation exists. If he rules that a violation does exist, he shall so 
inform the person or party against whom such violation is found ordering him to 
cease such violation. Any person or party aggrieved by a ruling or decision of the 
Inspector of Buildings upon such complaint may appeal to the Board of Appeals as 
hereinafter provided. 

If the violation is not stopped within an appropriate time following notification, 
the Inspector of Buildings shall notify the Town Manager for appropriate action. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Town amend 
its Zoning By-Law Section VIII. A., entitled "Enforcement", by striking out the en- 
tire section VIII. A. and substituting therefore the following: 

A. Enforcement 

This By-Law shall be administered by the Inspector of Buildings and all local 
Building Inspectors, appointed by the Town Manager. No building shall hereafter be 
built or altered and no use of land requiring a building permit shall be begun or 
changed without a permit having been issued by him. No building so built or altered 
shall be occupied until a certificate of occupancy as required by the State Building 
Code Sec. 120.1 has been issued by him. 

Applications for building permits shall be accompanied by a plot plan of the lot 
in duplicate, drawn to scale, showing the actual dimensions of the lot and the ex- 
act location and size of the buildings already upon the lot and of the building or 
structure to be erected, together with ways on and adjacent to the lot. A record of 
such applications and plot plans shall be kept on file in the office of the In- 
spector of Buildings. 

Any person violating any of the provisions of this By-Law may be restrained as 
provided by law. 

If any Board, agency, or official or resident of the Town shall complain in 
writing to the Inspector of Buildings that a provision or provisions of this 
Zoning By-Law are being violated, identifying the violation or violations he be- 
lieves to exist and the person or party in violation, the Inspector of Buildings 
shall investigate such complaint and shall respond to the complainant ruling that 
a violation does or does not exist. Failure of the Inspector of Buildings to so re- 
pond within thirty days (30) after receipt of such complaint shall be deemed a 
ruling or decision by him that no violation exists. If he rules that a violation 
does exist, he shall so inform the person or party against whom such violation is 
found ordering him to cease such violation. Any person or party aggrieved by a 

129 



ruling or decision of the Inspector of Buildings upon such complaint may appeal to 
the Board of Appeals as hereinafter provided. 

If the violation is not stopped within an appropriate time following notification 
the Inspector of Buildings shall notify the Town Manager for appropriate action. 

The vote was more than the 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mr. Erickson. 

*At this time Moderator William Dalton stepped down and Mr. Frederick P. Fitzgerald | 
took the gavel. Mr. Dalton resumed the Moderator position for Article 25 and the 
completion of the Warrant. Mr. Fitzgerald had been previously sworn to the faith- 
ful performance of his duties. 

* ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to extend the General Business Distric] 
near the intersection of North Main Street and Balmoral Street in Shawsheen Village 
in a Southerly direction along the Easterly side of North Main Street to include the 
following premises: Being Lots numbered 95, 96 and 97 on the Zoning Assessors' Maps 
and shown on Map 36, said premises being more particularly bounded and described as 
follows : 

WESTERLY 184 feet, more or less, by the centerline of North Main Street; 

NORTHERLY 165 feet, more or less, by the present business zone; 

EASTERLY 191 feet, more or less, by the centerline of the Shawsheen River; 

and 

SOUTHERLY 175 feet, more or less, by Lot t/8 as shown on said Assessors' 

maps . 

on petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to extend the General Business 
District near the intersection of North Main Street and Balmoral Street in Shawsheen i 
Village in a Southerly direction along the Easterly side of North Main Street to in- 
clude the following premises: Being Lots numbered 95, 96 and 97 on the Zoning 
Assessors' Maps and shown on Map 36, said premises being more particularly bounded 
and described as follows: 

WESTERLY 184 feet, more or less, by the centerline of North Main Street; 

NORTHERLY 165 feet, more or less, by the present business zone; 

EASTERLY 191 feet, more or less, by the centerline of the Shawsheen River; 

and 

SOUTHERLY 175 feet, more or less, by Lot 98 as shown on said Assessors' 

maps. 

The vote YES — 413, NO — 64 voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mr. Erickson. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Agawam Lane as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Selectmei 
as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision plan Farrwood Forest, Andover, 
Massachusetts, Roy Farr Owner and Subdivider", 
dated April 10, 1967 which plan is recorded 
with North District of Essex Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 5806. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on 
file with the Town Clerk. On petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 25 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

130 



A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Eagle Way as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Selectmen 
as shown on a Plan Entitled: 

"Subdivision of part of land shown on Plan 
Number 1711A2" Registered with North District 
of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
1711Y, filed with Certificate Number 6721 in 
Registration Book 45, Page 285. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for Recording purposes on 
file with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 26 as printed 
in the warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name that 
portion of Farrwood Drive lying easterly of portions accepted by the Town on March 
7, 1964 from station 14 plus 47.27 in North Farrwood Drive proceeding easterly, 
southerly and then westerly to station 2 plus 99.59 in South Farrwood Drive as 
approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a 
Plan Entitled: 

"Subdivision Plan Farrwood Forest, Andover 
Massachusetts, Roy Farr owner and subdivider", 
dated April 10, 1967 which plan is recorded with 
North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as 
Plan Number 5806. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on 
file with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 27 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Public way and name 
Mohawk Road as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Selectmen 
as shown on a Plan entitled: 

"Subdivision plan Farrwood Forest, owner and 
subdivider Roy Farr", dated July 19, 1968 
which plan is recorded with North District of 
Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6029 
and, Subdivision of part of land shown on 
Plan Number 1711A2 Registered with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds as 
Plan Number 1711Y, filed with certificate 
Number 6721 in Registration Book 45, Page 285. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on 
file with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 28 as printed 

131 



in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Penobscot Way as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Select 
men as shown on a Plan entitled: 

"Subdivision Plan Farrwood Forest, Andover, Mas- 
sachusetts, Roy Farr Owner and Subdivider", 
dated April 10, 1967 which plan is recorded with 
North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan 
Number 5806. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on 
file with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 29 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Seneca Circle as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board of Select 
men as shown on a Plan entitled: 

"Subdivision of part of land shown on Plan 
Number 1711A2" registered with North District 
of Essex Registry of Deeds as plan Number 
1711Y, filed with certificate Number 6721 in 
Registration Book 45, Page 285. 

Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 30 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 10:51 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



ELDEN R. SALTER, CMC, 
TOWN CLERK 



132 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



DECEMBER 31, 1975 



State Equalized Valuation 

Borrowing Capacity 5% 

Town Debt as of December 31, 1975 

Less Debt Outside Debt Limit: 

1957-South School $ 

1961-Sanborn School 

1963-Accelerated Sewer 

1966-New Senior High School 1, 

1966-Fish Brook 

1967-Water Mains, No. St. & 

Bancroft Rd . 
1967-Bancroft School 1, 

1967-New High School Additional 
1968-West Elementary Additional 1, 
1968-Water Bonds, Ind . Park & 

Bancroft Loop 
1970-Water Mains, Lowell St. 
1971-Water Treatment Plant 2, 

1973-Shawsheen-Doherty Renovat ion 
1974-Sewer West Andover 
1975-Water Treatment Plant Additional 
1975-West Andover Sewer Balance 2, 



$350,600,000 
17,530,000 



$14,053,700 



80,000. 

55,000. 
320,000. 
950,000. 
400,000. 

360,000. 
040,000. 
500,000. 
445,000. 

105,000. 

75,000. 
150,000. 
785,000. 
135,000. 

50,000. 
320,000 



$11,770,000 



Town Debt Inside Debt Limit 



Borrowing Capacity as of December 31, 1975 



$ 2,283,700 
$ 15,246,300 



Debt Inside Debt Limit-Appropriation 
Voted but not Bonded: 

1975-Water Mains Elm Street 



$140,000 



133 



Town Debt as of December 31, 1975: 



DATE OF BONDS 

1/15/57 

10/1/61 

11/15/63 

4/1/66 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/71 

7/15/73 

7/15/74 

3/3/75 

12/15/75 



DATE OF BONDS 

2/1/56 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/70 

7/15/71 

5/15/74 

5/15/75 

12/1/75 



OUTSIDE 

South School 

Sanborn School 

Accelerated Sewer 

New Senior High 

Fish Brook 

Water Mains, No. St. & Bancroft Res. 

Bancroft School 

New Senior High Additional 

West Elementary Additional 

Water Mains, Ind . Park & Bancroft Loop 

Water Mains, Lowell St. 

Water Treatment Plant 

Shawsheen-Doherty Renovations 

Partial-West Andover Sewer 

Water Treatment Plant Additional 

Sewer West Andover Ind. Park 



INSIDE 

Senior High School (West Jr. High) 

Municipal Buildings 

Public Safety Center 

Sewer, Ind. Park & Bancroft Loop 

Streets, Ind. Park 

East Jr. High Remodeling 

Land Acquisition-Conservation 

Sewer, Lowell, Chestnut & Summer St 

Public Safety Center 

School Land Acquisition 

Teachers Fiscal Cycle Loan 

Doyle Land Acquisition 

Plans Water System 



$ 


80 


000. 




55 


000. 




320 


000. 


1 


,950 


000. 




400 


000. 




360 


000. 


1 


,040 


000. 




500 


000. 


1 


,445 


000. 




105 


000. 




75 


000. 


2 


,150 


000. 




785 


000. 




135 


000. 




50 


000. 


2 


,320 


000. 



$11,770,000 



$ 5 


000. 


555 


000. 


330 


000. 


325 


000. 


60 


000. 


80 


000. 


135 


000. 


100 


000. 


50 


000. 


70 


000. 


165 


000. 


240 


000. 


168 


700. 



$ 2,283,700 



134 



HCMintD^HOC5Hmoioo(OoOHHOOifiooot>oo5^tDO)Ninon 
ot»^ionwwinocoNmoNHONHNnoonmoooi>toNn* 

ooiflmoNtDOMnNNooo^OHOOOoooo^miN05min*Tfo«) 



HoannmcviNNcit»nMON 
(DmHnNHOnDn^MOOinH 

CM CM rHCMrH CD CM OO rH CD 



05Wlfi!flHHinNMHCOnOMff)C1^ 
HCOtflifln(D!fltDOOHOOC500lO(N001 
i-H CO CM O T^LO^COCniM cd co 
CM rH Tt< 00 CM rf CM CO 

CM CO 



00 

l> 

<T> 
00 
00 
05 
00 



Ph 



co 
<: 

Ph 

Eh 



PS 
Q 



o o o 
o o o 



CM 00 m 
rH l> 



omoo> no 


o 


00 t> <M T}< 00 


00 


o t* o en m o 


o 


CM m CO CM CM 


CO 


O rH O rH o o 


o 


fflTfOMS 


CD 


O CNl o oo ■<* co 


o 


ih cm o m ■* 


t> 


O O CO CO 


rH 


G> CM CD ■* 


l> 


H rH 




H H 00 


CD 






H 


CO 



00O)CT)O00' rt< 00a>^C0^C0aiCOI>CDCMiO00CTiCM- rt< 00 
CM00U^a5CMHCMCT5'HHH00rt<CTi00'*CDHa2OCT>C0CMCM 



o 
o 



in 

CM 



o 
o 



o 

00 



O00t^TfiCD'<*OTt < 



inaiOlOOCOHTfCIN^HOOHKIMOHtONIMOD'O 
COCM HHCDmoOHTpCOCMCCCO rHTj<COm00l>mTF 

HrH rH rHrHLOCO H H CD Tj" 1 

H CM 00 



OOCMOmcO^CTJCD 
r«i>CM^C000OCM 
CM CM 00 H O CO 
■* H CM rH CM 



00 

o 



o 

CM 
CM 

CD 



CM 

O 

o 

CO 
CD 



H 
X 

ft 

o 

CO 
CJ 



co 
Q 



Ph 
< 

cj 

r? 

ft 
CO 

XJ 

c 



Ph 
Ph 

ft 

W 
CJ 



Eh 
CO 

Ph 



CO 
Eh 
H 
CO 



P 



ft 

a 

Jz; 

ft 



rH 
HH 

u 

(H 



PS 
< 
IH 

O 
IH 

ft 
ft 
Sz; 

ft 

co. 



CO 
ft 



CD 
CT5 



o 



o t> 

o m 
o o 

O Tt* 
CD CO 



CM 

CD 



CJ> 



o 
o 

o 
o 

CD 
00 



C0C0CDCDCDi>CMOi>CDO00OOTfimi>C0in00OOI>O03CDi>00C0CMCM 

i>ooooi>ococMcDincMaioooHco , <HCMrj<cooocoincoHCMcoa5rf | CM 
^cDmoomHCMCDC7>HHcoooocTiLnrHinrHOO^mocDi>oinoH 

NNNr^TH^CMCOHCOCMHOOCMt^^CMcOLnrHinCMCMTfCDOCDHOCM 

•*coHcocMH00incocDCMcoinm HcocDcococDco[^oocDmHCDinoc~ 

CMCM rHCMH CD CM G> rH in H CO CO N in in CD CM l> CM c- o 

H CM O-^OCMt* H(N 

CM CO 



o o 


o o 


O 


o o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


H 


i> 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 










00 






o o 


o 


o 


O 


O O CD 


o 


o 


O 00 


o 


o 


o 


m 


o 


m 










00 






o o 


OOOOOthoOOiOCM 


o 


o 


00 


o 


m 










CM 






o o 


in 


m 


O 


O O Tf 


o 


o 


o ■* 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


CM 










CO 






o o 




CM 


CM 


o o in 


CO 


o 


O CO 


CO 


m 


CM 


m 


CD 


CO 










m 






rH rH 








H H 






rH 


rH 


t> 


H 


m 


!h 



ft 

■H 

X 
CO 
Sh 
Rj 
H 
O 


>> 
in 

;>> 

P^ Sh -P >> 
U >> Sh 
>> Sh P E 
•P Sh -P 
-P E CJ 


m 
<* 

CO 


T3 

>> 


rH 
ft 

E 















rH 

























-P 


X 


E -P E 




c 














O 




CO 


W 


CO 












lH 







CJ 


E CJ CO 




D 














O 







CD 















CJ 




E CO CJ E - CJ 


















xi 




N 


N 


N 












H 









CJ X 




X3 














CJ • 


• 


•H 


•H 


•H 












H 




CJ 


c 


CJ CJ C 



















CO 4-> 


p 


^ 


!h 


£ 



















o 


> X Sh -H > 




H 














ft 


ft 


ft 












& 




X 


•H 


O X CO =3 -P 




X2 














C 





















1 


H 


CJ 


■p 


%i -H X CO !h 




Ri 














(DQQ'D'O 


bC • 


• 










>> 


BJ -p 


Sh 


rt O Sh Sh CJ 3 O 




CO 








r- 1 






CD 




ri 


In 


a co 


co 







VI 





Sh 


ft CO 


P 


> 


3 aj M 




•H 








CO OS 




to 


XI iH 


rH 


ai 


Bj 


•H • 


• 




u 


h 


fH 





•H 


X 


Sh 


hCX ftp D til 




Q 






? 


Sh -H 




u 


CO 


XI 


X 


rH M 


h 




a 





a 


■P 


CJ U U 





CO CO <d c 




1 









?H 







•S o 


o 


CJ 





rH • 


• 


H 


SH 


? 


SH 





C 




CO 


•H -P -H -H 




-a 






Sh 


^ 




^ 


d x 


X 


C 


c 


> > 





rH 





rH 


S 


•H -P 


• 


C 


Sh • CO Sh • Sh 











CJ 


E 




o 


X o 


CJ 


3 


p 


ft • 


• 


3 





H 








&5 








ft X P ft 




faD 






CO 


rH 




H 


CO CO 


CO 


ft ft 


CO-^^PhSsPhSsO 


COCJCOCO&CJCOCO 




< 




c 


■H 

P 


H Ph S 




ft 































/-^ *- \ 










lH 




























> > 






CO ^~v/~v ^ 








oj 




d 




























o o 






10^ O H/-nH 








■P 




•H 














c 






& 








Jh Sh 






Sh rH H l> CD CO 








•H 




Sh X3 














C rH 






rt 








o a 














H 




O 












c 


H 


c 




X 














£ 


rH 







■H 


CO 


E 












o 


o u 


H 




CO 








&JD faC 






O 


d 


H 




X3 





& 













■H 


c 


O 












c c 






H Sh Sh Sh U U 


ftX2 




03 


rH 


S 













fafi 


C -H 


CJ 




>> 




T3 Xi 


•H -H 


Sh 




Ph nS d d ci d 


•H 


B3 


c 


X 


oj 


• 


c 










CD 


•H J 


G 









C 


C 


u u 







CJ CJ a CJ u 





rH 








CO 


<n 


Bj 




a 






HH iJ 


-H 




3 




o 





ft ft 5 




S3 


C 


•H 


•H 


Ph 




H 


Sh 


X 











CO HH 




J 




E 


E CO CO 


O 




O H H H rH rH 


•H 


bJ 


p 







Bj CO 


3 


-P 


CO 






c 


• 










>> 


>i 


1 1 


H 




■P Bj rt Ki d d 


^ 


> 


Bj 


Sh 


H 


> 3 


Cfi 


in 


X! 






«S > 


• 




o3 




a 


03 


If) CO Mh 




bC 3 p 3 3 P 


<! 


N 


OJ 


•P 


-a -h 


c 


03 


u u 




S>> 


CJ 


• C 


-"3 


Sh 






Pi K 


5h !h 


1 


a 


C -P -P +J -P +-> 


1 


i 


rH 


& 


■H 


Sh H 


H 


S 


d 




o 


■H 


< -H 




CO-P 









a 





•H 








iH 




Eh 


03 




O 


X ft-P 


u 


Sh 


rH 


a 


rH 


•H 


H 


• 


• 


S* ? 





■p 


H ftftftftftHrHX! 


-P 




H C 


c &■ 


O BJ 


rH 


G 


o3 


s 


>> 


> 


ai h^ 


H 


o o 


H 


H 


Sh Sh Sh U U U 


S 


=5 


CTJ 


CO 


K 


H U 


^ 




•H M 








£ 


• S 


e 


cd 


cd 


S 


• 


• 


rH rH 


H 


aS 


d 





o 


P 


o 


03 


d O 


o 


• 


«PffiU<!«J!WWHQW^Wfeh<tflHftftHpHar>ifHKlHHwUfH< 



t> 

m 



m 

oo 



CM 

CD 



O 

CM 

00 
rr 
CM 
CM 

00 



135 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 



July 1, 1974 



TO 



June 30, 1975 



RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



Local Aid and Agency Funds: 
Machinery Basis 
Veterans Benefits 

Loss of Taxes - State Properties 
School Transportation 
Construction of School Projects 
School Lunch Program 
Regional Public Libraries 
Free Public Libraries 
Vocational Education 
Regional School District Aid 
Natural Resources 

Tuition & Transportation of Children 
Valuation Basis 
Special Education Programs 
School Aid 
Beano Fees 
Lottery 
Highway 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Licenses : 
Dog Fees 
Liquor 
Marriage 
Miscellaneous 

Fines 

Special Assessments: 
Unapportioned Sewer 
Apportioned Sewer Paid in Advance 
Apportioned Sewer Added to Taxes : 

Current Year 

Previous Years 






21,301.83 
73,137.90 
82,469.70 
326,744.27 
141,024.04 
70,651.26 



13,452.41 
143,509.01 

75,728.00 

1,513,462.64 

187.99 

126,976.30 

60,460.72 



883,532.19 
436,530.04 



999.95 

18,035.00 

892.00 

5,919.20 



1,449.85 

15,821.62 
41.85 



2,649,106.07 



1,320,062.23 



25,846.15 
7,207.00 



136 



July 1, 1974 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 
FOR THE PERIOD OF 

TO 



June 30, 1975 



RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES (con't) 



Unapportioned Water 

Apportioned Water Paid in Advance 

Apportioned Water Added to Taxes : 

Current Year 

Previous Years 

General Government: 

Rent of Town Property 
Miscellaneous 

Protection of Persons and Property 
Ambulance Fees 
Building Inspector 
Electrical Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Miscellaneous 

Health and Sanitation: 
Septic Tank Permits 
Plumbing Inspector 
Sewer Installations 
Miscellaneous 

School : 

Summer School Tuition 
Other Tuition 
Rentals and Other 

Recreation : 

Self Supporting Programs 



205.50 

1,324.81 
124.08 



4,408.00 
8,723.50 



4,155.00 
20,882.00 
6,402.00 
1,296.00 
6,173.15 



2,938.00 

970.00 

8,053.50 



3,680.00 

3,848.27 

814.03 



18,904.75 



18,967.71 



13,131.50 



38,908.15 



11,961.50 

8,342.30 
18,904.75 



137 



July 1, 1974 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 
FOR THE PERIOD OF 

TO 



June 30, 1975 



RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES (con't) 



Public Service Enterprises : 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Liens Added to Taxes : 

Current Year 

Previous Years 

Cemeteries : 

Care of Lots 

Foundations 

Tombs and Interments 

Libraries : 

Fines and Sales 

Interest : 

Committed 

Revenue Funds 

Non-Revenue Fds 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Taxes and Assessments 

Tax Titles 

Farm Animal 1 Excise Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Andover Housing Authority 
Lieu of Taxes 



628,966.62 
8,190.51 

30,566.89 
2,380.72 



20.00 
1,510.00 
3,465.00 



7,495.40 

319,443.01 

18,114.98 

779.23 

16,240.66 

4.58 



1,020.00 



670,104.74 

4,995.00 
704.48 



362,077.86 

1,020.00 

2,714.00 

5,154,053.44 






138 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 
FOR THE PERIOD OF 

July 1, 1974 TO June 30, 1975 

RECEIPTS NOT INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 

Tax Title Redemptions 45.10 

Dog Funds - Care and Custody 936.00 

Insurance Claims 10,950.14 

Workmen's Compensation Refunds 2,153.65 
Refunds : 

Departmental 12,431.32 

Petty Cash 1,700.00 

Sale of Equipment 4,480.85 
Recycling : 

Paper 6,408.23 

Glass 3,790.85 

Metal 1,752.81 

Other 1,905.98 13,857.87 

Telephone Commissions 747.57 

Group Insurance Dividends 8,609.00 

Miscellaneous 352.14 

Military Service Credit 785.92 

Refund Ch. 824 Act 1974 5,678.94 

Recreation 1,911.87 

Reimbursement For Taxes CI 22 2,800.00 

Sp Ed Aid to Deaf and Blind 243.00 

Reimbursement - Conservation Land 18,891.25 

Reimbursement - Hwy Sect 1 825 87,397.00 

Spec Gas Tax Aid Chap 58 - 18B 119,786.31 

Corp & Tax CI 37 6 mos. 74 612.50 

CI 37 Fiscal 75 1,225.00 

CI 22 6 mos. 74 1,400.00 

Reimbursement CI 17 Widows 262.50 297,257.93 



139 



July 1, 1974 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 
FOR THE PERIOD OF 

TO 



June 30, 1975 



AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Personal Property Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Real Estate Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Dog Licenses from County 
Dog Licenses to County 
Off Street Parking Meters 
Sale of Dogs 
School Lunch Program 
Andover Athletic Program 
Cemetery Sale of Lots 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Interest : 

Spring Grove Cemetery Funds 

Trust and Investment Funds 

Flower Funds 
Municipal Debt: 

Loans in Anticipation of Revenue 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 

Bond Issue 

Premium on Bond Issue 

Non-Revenue Cash Investments 

Revenue Cash Investments 
Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross and Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

Group Insurance - Optional 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

United Fund 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 

Withholding Taxes - State 

Miscellaneous 
Transfer to Surplus Revenue 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 
Guarantee Deposits 
Tailings 



507,294.50 
2,941.20 



11,590,554.00 
113,444.14 



12,908.69 

13,629.47 

1,435.45 



510,235.70 



11,703,998.14 



8,244.05 

1,763.00 

87.00 

305,338.01 

13,778.87 

4,700.00 

8,100.00 



27,973.61 



490,000.00 

90.00 

800,000.00 

29,650,000.00 

119,844.23 

6,932.59 

12,306.14 

20,732.50 

3,481.59 

1,539,451.35 

394,652.78 

36,368.11 

1,054.49 

375.28 



140 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 
FOR THE PERIOD OF 



July 1, 1974 



TO 



June 30, 1975 



AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS (con't.) 



School Aid - Title Accounts: 
Title I - O. L. 874 
Title I - E. S. E. A. 
Title II - E. S. E. A. - Library- 
Title III - N. D. E. A. 
Title VI - N. D. E. A. 
Title VIB - P. L. 91-230 
Title I - Breakfast Reimb. 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 

Interest on Investments 

Off Duty Police 

Police Legal Advisor 

Sale of Trash Bags 



65,886.00 

44,888.00 

2,500.00 

37,763.00 

37,158.00 
809.34 



189,004.34 

1,771,127.25 

15,072.25 

84,135.64 

8,500.00 

64,240.00 



47,791,586.92 



Group 1 - 5,154,053.44 
Group 2 - 297,257.93 
Group 3 - 47,791,586.92 

53,242,898.29 



141 





CJ CO 

a o t~ 
a p o> 

rH tH 

at 










> 


<D 




a> 







K 


c 






at 





• 


r-l 


p 


Sn 


ni 




3 


DO 




(/) 


a> 




V 


o 




a 


a 




c 


at 





V 


H 


p 


> 


at 




Cl) 


PQ 




K 

a 


<U 




3 


O 




£ 


c 






rt 







H 


P 


m 


a 




(i> 


cu 




OS 


■a 






CD 






■a 






c 






0) 






a 






X 






w 







rH 


o 


rH £) 


o 


cj at 




-p i-i 


in 


-H 


N 


E-l at 


rH 


> 




< 





rl 


<H S 

CO o 

a u 



Ifl 
•p 
a 

•H 
CD 
O 


OS 



rl 


BI 




a. c 







O 




!h 


■H 




q,p 




a 


RS 




< 






IB 






O 






G 


e Tt< 


a 


o 


r~ 


rH 


u 


<35 


Bi 


«H 


rH 


CJ 







00 r-l 
00 rH 


00 00 
<# 00 


in 


•* CO 

CM CO 

rH 


00 rH 
CM 

rH 


rH 
05 
CM 




CM 
rH 


CM 

r-l 




co 

CM 


00 

CM 


CM C5 
rH 00 


CM CM 

m co 


m 

r-l 


m co 
t- m 


r> m 

<tf o 

05 rH 


t> 

05 


•tf CM 


rH CO 
CO 


in 


o o 
o o 


O CM 
O CD 


CM 
CD 


o o 

O 00 
00 CD 


co m 

l> CO 

O rH 


CD 
rH 
00 


■* CM 


CM CD 
CD 


m 


O 

o 




o 
o 


o 
o 

o 




o 
o 
o 








CO 




CO 


o 
o 


O CM 
O rH 


CM 
rH 


o 
o 
o 


O 00 

oo m 

CM 


00 
CO 
CO 








co 


■* 


t~- 




o 
in 


o 
m 




o 


t~ 


o o 
o o 


o o 

o o 


o 
o 


o o 

O 00 
00 CD 


CO o 
05 t> 
t> o 


rH 
t> 


M< CM 


t> CD 

m 


rH 



oo m 


c- t- 

(H 05 


01 rH 

05 C~ 


m t- 

CM CD 


m m 

O rH 


rH rH 
CD CM 


rH CM 

co r- 
in 


00 00 
Oi CO 

o o 


00 o 

CM rH 

05 


c- in 
i> in 


CM CO 

rH 00 

rH 


in rH 

in co 

O rH 



o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 



m o 

H< rH 



co 05 

■* rH 



IB 


CO CO 


CO CO 


CD 


a CD CD 


■H 


O 


CJ O 


hD O 


•H 


E -h to -h m 


-rl 


H > 


P > CD > 


os > 


S5 H ri 


o u co u in 


u 


WOO 


CD CD C O G 


•O 


S P CO 


rH CO J* CO 


C CO 


IS at 


O. G, 


CO at 


OS U rH 


MH K hOrH !«! 

OH (1 UN 


H rH 


w cd at 


H M u 


> T3 C 


<H S S S 


O C C 


O O 


o o u at o ri 


zoo 


a s co 


CO S CO 


W -H CO 


!h 


■O H£ rl £ 


O P !h 


J C CD 


!h P C P 


< CJ 


< SB. 


ni 0, O 5 0, O 


Oh 


02 


O 


PH rH 


W Eh 


m h 


6h W 


55 




< 


w 




Eh 


o 




CO 



CO 

P 

CO P 

n -h 

g 

Oh E 

S3 



•H CO 

> -P 

H CO s 

c at 

CO -P 

a e 



c cj 
ouo 
co < 
u s 
p c 
a o s 
o 

Eh 



CO rl CO 


CJ hCI 

•H CO 3 -rl 

> CO > 

M 10 St H 

C 

CO u CO 

ftp 

■H * I rH 

CS H rl CJ 

C O C 

O rl "P 

CO O CO 

rl XI rl 

P rH 

Oh O rH Oh 
O 
O 



CO 

rl 

CO o 

CO 

CO CO 

S 

CO 

Oh CO 

X < 

w 





J3 T3 

-P rl 

O at 
O 
03 



CO 



o 

•H CO 

> 

rl CO 



CO CO 



o o 

•H CO -H CO 



CO CO 

ho 

s 







a 

CO rH 
Oh 

rH x m 
at W C 
C 3 

O rl O 
CO O 

rl J3 

-P c 

a o s 
o 
^1 



> 
u 
o 

CO 
Oh 

-h a a 

n w u 
a 

O r. rH 
CO O 

ri x; 
c 
O =s 
o 





rt CO T3 rl 
C rl 

CO at CO 
Oh 

rH X CQ rH 

at W at 
C bD c 

OhCO 
CO -H CO 

rl X! n tH 



co -n 

-a 

CO rH 

a -h 



0PC0PC0P 

So JftOsfiO 



co 


(0 

c 

3 CO 
ChD3 Oh 

>h "- 1 >i 

m rH m is 
at c 

!H a O rl 

-H CO 

roti£ 

■rl 0) H-> 

a & o 
I 



rH rH 



0) CO 
o> 0) 


CO 
rH 


co 


CO CO 

oo m 


rH OS 
O CM 


m co 

t^ CO 


o o 
o m 


m m 

05 CO 


©5 05 
CO C~ 


rH rf 
00 00 


O CM 
O CD 


r-t t- 
t~- O 
CM 00 


oo 

CD 
CM 


CM 

co 


in rH 
t> 05 
CD O 


m 

oo 

CD 


m 

o 


CO 01 
t> CM 

oo m 


o o 

O rf 

m cm 


O CM 

n cd 

05 l> 


05 ■«< 
O CM 
CM CD 


rH CO 

■* 00 
05 in 


o m 

rH 05 
O CO 


CT> CD 
rH rH 




CO 


00 O 
"tf rH 


to 


00 


co m 

rf rH 


O rH 
rH rH 


CM 


o m 

rH rH 


t> CM 

rH CO 


rH CO 


O O 
O O 


o 

o 


o 

o 


O O 

o m 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o o 
o o 


o o 

o o 


o o 
o m 


O O 
O O 


O 00 


o o 
o o 


cm m 

r> co 

O) 0) 


o 
o 
oo 


in 

rH 


■* o 

t» CO 

r> rH 


rH 
CD 


in 
CO 

o 


rH in 

CM <tf 

CD O 


o o 
o o 
m co 


m m 

05 05 


in o 
cd m 

CM 00 


CO CO 
l> 00 

cm m 


o in 

rH rH 
O CO 


en co 

rH rH 




CO 


O) rH 
'HH rH 


CD 

m 


oo 


CO 05 
H< rH 


O rH 
rH rH 


o •* 

CM 


rH 00 

rH rH 


00 CM 

rH CO 


rH in 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


T)l 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


X 


o 


o 


o 


1" 


CM 


m 


o 


o 


C75 


m 


CD 


rH 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


CO 


X 


rH 


o 


CD 


CM 


CM 


05 


X 


rH 


co 


rH 


co 


05 


X 




CO 


05 




CD 


CM 


CM 


^1 



cm m 


© in 


o m 


cm m 


co m 


o o 


<tf o 


05 O 


m o 


o in 


r> cd 


O rH 


05 CO 


m co 


CO CO 


o o 


t> 05 


co m 


X o 


O rH 


CD X 


X ■* 


CO 05 


CO o 


t~ o 


m o 


05 X 


CD X 


05 CO 


CD CO 



c 
o 

•H 

CO 

CO CO 

•H 

E O 

E -H CO 

> 

O !h CO 

c 

a w 

O Oh 

•H rH * 

-P at W 

at C 

> o u 

rl CO 

CD U C 

CO P 

c a o 

o 

o 



142 



1) 











10 


c 


o 


t>- 


U-P01 


rH 




i-H 


cd 






ca 






0) 




> 







0) 


c 




cc 


a 


o 




rH 


+» 


Sh 


Cd 




P 


OJ 




w 
















3 


c 




G 


oi 





a; 


rH 


-p 


> 


id 




0) 


no 






<D 




c 







3 


c 




Ln 


cs 


o 




rH 


+-> 


m 


cd 




<i) 


CO 




cc 



T3 


■a 
c 

a 



a> 

I-H rH 
Cd J2 
-P n! 

H -ri 
ni 

> 





<h e 
m o 
a u 
a <h 



u 
at 

(A O 

S3 -P 



■P 

a 

■iH 
V 

o 



U 10 
D, S3 

o o 

in -H 
a-P 

a a 
< 



a 

o 

e a ■* 

at o t~ 

rH U 01 

muH 
ca 







© 
o 






o 
o 






o 
o 
o 

CM 






01 

o 
m 




in 

CO 


CO 
CO 


i-H 
CO 


CD CM 
-r)i CD 






i-H 
CM 


-* 

CM 


O 
i-H 


T)i CD 

oo m 

CM 


o 
[> 

Ol 

I-H 

t> 
m 

CD 

■-h 

CM 




m 
co 


CD 


o oi 

O CD 


in co 


CO 




in 

H 
CM 


O 

o 

CO 

CM 
• CM 


o •* 

O !> 

O CO 

~ r 

CO t- 


t~ CO 

i-H O 
CO t- 

CO 


rH 
rH 
O 

O 
01 
CO 




O 

o 


O 
O 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


X 




o 

CO 


m 

CM 
CM 


o m 

O 00 
O CO 

CD 1> 


CM O 
O CD 
t> 01 

CO 


i-H 
Ol 
CM 

O 

i-H 






o 
o 




o 
o 


X 






o 
o 
o 

CO 




i-H 
X 
CM 


CO 
CM 

X 

m 

CO 

o 
in 

o 

CO 




© 

o 


o 
o 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 




o 

CO 


m 

CM 

i-H 
CM 


o m 

O 00 
O CO 

CO t- 


rH O 
CM CD 
■* 01 

CO 


01 
CO 
CM 

■* 

CO 


c 
c 

•H 
CO 
CO 

•H 










o 
in 

in 

01 
H 



r> i-H 


O 


X M" 


o 


m co 


o 


CO o 


m 


x •* 








in ■* 




CM 





Ol CM 
© O 
t- i-H 



O O 

O CO 



in oi 
co o 

t> i-H 



•* CM 
CD X 


■* X 

t> Ol 


CO Ol 

in cm 

CO 


co m 

itf CO 
CM CO 



t> o 

X rH 


■tf CM 


CO 


rH 


co in 
m co 

X rH 


to 

rH 

X 


CO 




CO 



CO CM 
i-H 01 


X CM 
CO ■* 


o t> 


CO X 

CO rH 


CD CM 
CM O 


o o 

o o 


CO O 
r-t 01 


oi m 
m i> 


X 


01 O 
CO CO 

co m 


i-H CD 

o m 

X 01 


O i-H 

o r> 

O CM 


o o 

CO l> 
■tfl rH 


in ■* 
oi m 

t> CM 


o m 

O t» 

M< CD 


O CO 
CO O 
l> CD 


rH o 
CO X 
CD X 


o 
m 



O CD 
CO CD 
X 



in cm 


m co 


o in 


•* o 


01 o 


o m 


in in 


X CD 


t- o 


co o 


O CM 


CM O 


CO 01 


o t> 


CO rH 


X r-< 


l-H o 


X o 


o ■* 


in in 


o m 


•* co 


o o 


Tf O 



O [> 

CO CD 
X 



O C- 
CO 



o o 
o o 


O X 
O X 


oi m 
o c- 

l> CM 


X t- 

CO 01 
C- CD 






X CO 
CD 


§;" 



X o 
m o 
m t> 



o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 



CO o 


t> ■* 


© m 


X o 


rH O 


o m 


oi in 


X o 


CD O 


CM t» 


O CM 


rH O 


X 01 


o t> 


^Jl i-H 


X o 


01 O 


i-H CO 


o ■* 


co in 


t- m 


•* CD 


o o 


T)< O 



r-N a 

• CD 

+» a 
a a 
o o 

OH IB 10 
*-y CD CO CD 
' CO o 

a -h 
CD > 
p. u 



WrH 

ni 



Cfl 

CD 
O 
CO tlD-H 
S3 > 
CO -H U 
S3 bO CD 
CD < X 
ft 

S3 i-H 
n! 



CO 10 
CD rH 
CO cd 



•rl CO 



& 
|-Hojl2wi3onsl3 tdW 



CD 

CO 

S3 CD CD 13 

CD P,X CD 

a a a 



(H rH 



W H-> <D cd 

O ai si u 

<i p +-> 4-> 

T3 O S3 

fL, a cd 



r( <-> 

CD -H 
J3 CJ 
V S3 
O 3 

(J 



S3 

Sh O SH 

CD CO CD 

J3 XS U Si 

4-> SH CD -P 

O cd a O 

O 

CQ 



10 

CD 
■P O 

S3 -H 
CD > 

a u 

+-> CD 

U X 

cd 
>• an 
Eh cd 
H Q S3 
Ph 
< (0 
X O Jh 

•iH 
UHft 

>-> o 
hh a 
ca 
a 



in 



4-> > 
CO S3 Sh 
S3 

a x 
a-p 
u 

cd cd 

a S3 
o 



N cd cd H 



CO 

10 

S3 
Cfl 

a c 





Q Cfl 

u 


sh a 




u a 


Si r-< 
•P -H 
O > 






+-> r< 


CJ 


CJ CJ o 3 


•H CO 


•H CO -H (fl (fl -H 


> 


> a > cd > 


U CO H 


SH tO tO Sh Ifl Sh 


S3 


S3 S3 S3 S 


X SH 


X HH X X 


ap 


a aiD 


i-h x a 
td w 


i-H « i-H rH X S3 rH 

cd W cd td W cd cd 


S3 O 


O S3 S3 


o u 


Sh -H Sh CO O 


CO i-H 


10 Sh tO P tO 


Sh J3 cd 


Si J3 P U Si Si Sh 


-p a 


P CJ P bo 


a o -h 


a o a o -h a 


S3 


rH 


< 


W ■£ 



•H CJ 



CO to 


CJ O 



tO P -H tO -H -H tfl 





tO Sh 

S3 a 

CO X 

a S3 

bjO (3 
SH S3 
-H tO 
XI T3 Sh 
P rH 
O -H a 



> fe 

to u u to 

S3 S3 

X X 

a a 

W O UW 

•H S3 

nfON 

O tfl 

J3 Sh J3 

P a P 

o tfl a o 

S3 



Q) > 

o <d 

c o ps 

a! +> 



W 



a) 




a) 


o 




3 


c 




C 


rt 


o 


(1) 


rH 


p 


> 


at 




a) 


w 




OS 


0) 




B 


o 




3 


c 


O fe 


cs 


■p 




rH 




(0 


rS 




(1) 


cu 




w 



CD 

•o 
c 

CD 
a 



CD 
r-l rH 

ni X! 
■P ca 

O r-l 

H -H 

C3 

> 



CD 

<H g 

CO O 

C rl 

CS "H 



co o 
e -p 
cs 



i 



rl 0) 

a c 
o o 
^ -h 
a-p 
a cs 
< 



0) 



00 o 
■* o 



CO 00 ■* o 
CO CO 00 CD 



l> © CD CO 00 05 CM 

in •* h oo o i> ■* 



00 CD 
CO o 



oj t> oo co oi m 

lO 1 * rH O IN in 
O 00 N l> CM 



CO O) 
O 05 
0> 05 



MHH C» rH O C~ 
■* CM CD rH 05 05 

in m in tom 



t> co 
t- in 
co co 

t> 



rH CO 
t> CO 



t» in 
to CN 
05 IM 



co t> 

rH 00 



00 O 00 
H 05 CO 
CD t» 05 



05 00 

cm 05 

00 H 



<tf CM 
00 o 

t- o 



CM CO 
IN 05 
CM CM 



O O 

O 00 



CO 05 rH 
CO O 00 



O 00 o 

o o o 



•^ m 

CO 



o o 
o o 



l> o 
05 O 



t- o 

CO o 

l-l t> 



O c- 

05 CO 

OS •* 



I> o 

05 00 
CD CD 



r-l in 

O 00 



rH CM O 

OrlO 

rH oo m 



t> o 
■* o 

CO CM 



00 o 

■* to 



rH in 
m o 

IN CO 



■tf 05 CM 
CO O 00 



to m 

CO 



05 O 
CM O 

to m 



o o 

o o 



o o 
o o 



l> o 


t> o 


o o 


co in 


CM O O 


t- o 


o o 


rH 


00 o 


in rj< 


o> •* 


00 » 


CO to o 


Tj< o 


•-< © 


IN 


to o 


to in 


to to 


o 00 


in t» o 


IM <M 


o to 


CM 



t* ON 
rH U 05 

S'HH 

ca 



CO o 
IN CO 



m cm 

to CO 



rH 05 rH 
CO O 00 



in in Hh- 



05 tO 

m oo 

t> 05 



E 

T3 
CO < 

O cs 

S lH 
II) 

o a 

J o 
ca 
o 
a 



co <u 

cd o 

o a 

•H CO CS 

> 4) a 

h ID V 

CO C P 

CO CD C 

a-n 



■H CO 

> CD bo 

U CO c 

CD G -H 

CO CD -P 

axi 

CUD 



M HX Hli rtljUH « I 

.. W ca H ca W ca W S cs W -i 

C CO B G >, B B J 

O ^ >,0 J< OUUOLitDOU 

CO CD ca CO CD COCDPCOtDrHCOCD-P 

Sh.bs^.ccojh.gco^.sos-i.ecd 

ifpp.BCD-PJ<iCD-PCDCDPiHCD-PCD 

a o boa o^ao^aoxao^ 



CO 



CO 


o 

tH 
> 

h 
CD 
CO 

bo 

B <-i 
•H CS 

s-< c 
cd o 

IV CO 

a u 

•H <1) 

boa 
c 

w 



144 



W O a w 



^H 


fn 





u 


<1> 


a) 


10 


CD 


J3 


-p 


U J3 


■p 


(15 


CS 


P 


o 


e a o 




<D 








O 







05 m 


CM O 


to 


00 00 


CO t~ 


C- 


CM CO 


O 00 


o 


CM CO 


O CM 


m 


■* CO 


in in 


in 








m m 


•* 05 


■* 


CO CO 


00 


to 




CM 


CO 


o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o o 


© 


CM O 


o o 


05 


00 c- 


to C- 


00 


rH CO 


m 05 


o 








t> to 


M< o 


05 


CO CO 


CM 


05 




CO 


CO 



CM O 

r-t O 
00 IN 



CO O 
CM t~ 

rH 05 

"tf O 
CM 

CO 






Q 


to 


CO 




CD 





W 


O 





H 


■H CO 


•rl CO -P 


CO 


> CD 


> CD CJ 


< 


U CO 


sh to ca 


* 


CD C 


tIBh 




CO CD 


CO CD H-> 


u 


a CD 


a c 


a 


ca w co 


rH X 


<; 


ca w cj 




C CO 


s 


z 


o u s 


0^0 


o 


CO <D 


CO CD btJ 


HH 


^ in J3 "O 


h£ 4 


H 


CD CD +> -iH 


CD +-> X! 


< 


S a O rH 


ftOh 


H 


CD 


ca 


I— i 


n co 


U 


Z 






< 






CO 







cd 













e 






ct 


o co 


rH 


+> 


t> 


cd 




en 


to 




r-l 


o 




> 







ID 


a 




05 


a 







rH 


p 




CB 




rl 


CQ 




3 
CO 


CD 











0) 


c 




3 


a 





c 


rH 


p 


ID 


cS 




> 


CQ 




0) 


O 




a 







~> 


a 




fe 


CS 


o 




rH 


P 


CO 


CS 




<D 


CQ 




05 


■0 






o 






■a 






a 






a> 






a, 







1-1 Tj< 

lO CO 

W CO 

GO CD 

CD 



r-l S> 

-P r-l 
O -H 

> 
< 



B) O 

C3 rl 



ri 
CD 
<H 

CO O 
C -P 



■P 

a. 

■rl 
CO 

o 

CD 
05 



I 

•rl 0) 

'h a 
a o 

o -rl 
u -P 

a cij 

a 

<: 



CD 

o 

a e 
a o ■* 

rH rl t- 

CS <H 01 
CQ rH 



ai cd 


o 


m 


■* M 


o 


CO 


00 CM 


o 


rH 


in r-H 


o 


» 


0) CM 


CO 


t> 








CO TC 




00 


lO rH 




CD 


o o 


o 




O IM 


o 


O 
CM 


■* co 


o 




•tf o 


o 


O 


© 01 


CD 


m 






m 


■* ■* 




M 


in rH 




01 



o o 

o o 

CM O 

rH rH 
*? 

CO 



o o 

o o 

cm o 

CO rH 

CO 00 



■* o m 

CO Tt< o 

r-H O 01 



o o o 
o o o 

OlOO 
t- CM O 
TJ< O 



o o o 
o o o 

Tfmo 

CD rH l> 
CD O t> 



r-H P- 
r-H 00 
Ol r-H 

01 CO 

oi m 



o o o 

CM r-H O 


O 

co 


o oo m 
m t> o 
m o in 


CO 
CM 
CM 






m o co 

O ■* t)< 

in CD r-H 


01 

00 
CM 






CD rH 


oo 


CM CM O 

moo 


■rjl 


t- co m 
o cm oi 
i> cd m 


CD 
CM 






rH <* CO 
Tji CO "^ 
l> l> rH 


CI 
rH 
CO 



o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 


oo cm in 
•* m ai 
oo co m 


in 
01 






l> O CO 

■* m tji 

in CD rH 


rH 
rl< 
CO 






CD rH 


oo 


SMCM 

m o 


m 


01 ■* 
m ■* 

00 CO 


co 
o 

CM 






CO CO 

oi m • 

rH 00 


CM 



o ■* 

o o 

O r-H 

O rH 

O •* 



01 O 

co m 
i> in 

O CM 
CO CO 



rH 00 



in ^ 

rH CM 

oo m 

CO rH 



O CM 

O l> 

co o 

O rH 

in o 

CO 00 

00 <-< 

CM rH 



O CM O 

o m o 

CO TP o 
O CM O 
CO O 01 

O CM rH 
CM rH 



O 00 
O CO 
CM C- 



rH CM 

m t» 


CO 


i-H o 

m o 

rH 01 


CM 

in 
o 



01 © 


01 


•rjl rH 


in 


CM CM 


■* 


CO rH 


■* 


t> O! 


to 






■* O 


m 


00 CD 


<* 




rH 


O CM 


CM 


O 00 


00 


•* CM 


CD 


00 rH 


01 


00 X 


CD 






CO CM 


01 


00 CD 


■* 



CM 00 
CO O) 

m t» 

CM CM 

00 CD 







CO 






CO 






<D 






CD 






CJ 




a 









•H 


CO 


o 


•H 




A 


> 


0) 


■H 


> 




■p 


tn 


CO 


+-> 


rl 




rH 


<D 


£3 





<D 




CD CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 




& 




a, a, 




E3 


33 


rH 


3 


CO 

a 


rH 

cti 


j 


<H 


C 




HH 


c 


< 








u 







w 




CO 


CD rH 


CO 


WO 


h 


J3 


aj 


u 


o 


u 

CS 


s, 


P 
O 


a 

■H 


& 


M 


O 






fi 




►J CQ 






< 




CQ 

p 












Ph 















CO -H 

w > 

U rl 
rH CD 
> CO 

05 

w co 

CO c 

n) 

CO Jh 

2 CD 

*« -P 

05 CD 

W > 
E-« 



CO > CD 

rl O 

H OJ R 

etf CO cd 

(3 -P 

O rl CO 

CO CD -H 

rl Si K 

CD -P CO 

On O <5 





co 




c 




0) 














■H 




■H 


CO 


-P 




> 


<D 


cS 




h 


CO 


O 




<D 


a 


O 




co 


CD 


> 




rH 


3 


rH 
CS 




c 




a 




o 


rl 


o 


CO 


CO 


<D 


•H 


►H 


rl 


J3 


U 


8 


CD 


P 


0) 


p. o n; 


a 








o 

CO 




145 



0) 

CD 
O 

•H CO 

> <D 

rl CO 

CD C 

CO CD 

a 
a 

>. CO CD 

05 rl £1 

< CD P 

05 P. O 
CQ 



<u 
o 

C CO 

« Ot~ 

rH 4-> CT> 

01 H 
CQ 



> 

U 

c as 

RS O 

rH 4-> U 

OS 3 

OD CO 







-n 







c 







p 


c 




Uh 


Rj 


o 




rH 


■H 


«i 


rt 




0) 


DQ 




PU 


■a 













■o 






c 






a> 






0, 






X 






w 







a! £i 
■P oi 

O rH 
Eh -h 

> 



U 


<H 

io e 

c o 

OS Sh 

!h <4H 



(1) 
<H 

CO O 
B +•> 

C3 



■H 


10 


u 


c 


a, o 


o 


•H 


r< 


4-> 


a a 


a 




< 




<D 




O 




C 


e ^ 


ca 


O f~ 


rH 


rl Cl 


nl <h H 


CQ 







CD 01 


lO 




oo c- 


cd 


(D 






O 3 


t- •* 


M 


a a 


<-t CO 


m 


as o 0) 


1TJ rH 


cd 


H+) > 


h n 


•» 


Rt 


rH l> 


oo 


m k 


N •-< 


CO 



CO o 
CO CM 
O) rH 



O CT> 
O ^ 

"tf CD 
O O 

in ■* 

CO <-i 
O CO 
CM CM 



CO o 
CO o 



o o 
o o 


o 
o 


co m 

CO CO 
CO t- 


rH 
O 






CO CO 
CD CM 
rH CQ 


rH 


O 
CO 


O 

CO 


•-< 

co 

m 


rH 

CD 

m 



CO 








w 








on 








HH 








« 




m 




U, 




0) 




OS 









w 




•H 


m 


H 




> 





B 




J-l 


in 


W 




11) 


c 






C/J 


<u 


w 






a 


u 




rH 


X 


HH 




OS W 


> 




c 




K 




o 


!h 


W 




10 


(1) 


w 


U 


rl XI 




(1) 


<1> 


+J 


(_> -p D o 


h- 1 


rt 






-J 3= 






CQ 








13 








ft 









o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


CD 


(0 


o 


01 


CO 



o 

CD 


O) 


CD 
CD 


o 
o 


o o o 

o o o 


o 

in 


o 
o 


CD 
O 


rH 
00 
CO 


CO 
CD 
CD 


o 
o 

CO 


00 o o 
CO CD C- 

inn N 


CO 
CM 


o 
o 


en 
m 


CO 

m 


m 


T"H 


in cm 


in 

CM 


rH 



o 


o 


m 


o 


00 o o 


^f 


o 


CD 


CO 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


CO CD t» 


r-l 


o 


O 


in 


co 


o 


CM 


00 


m in c- 


CD 


o 


CO 


rH 



o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


© 


o 


in 


o 


oo 


o 


o 


■rji 


o 


o 


r~ 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CD 


r~ 


r-l 


o 


o 


•* 


t> 


o 


rH 


co 


in 


m 


t~ 


CD 


o 


o 


r-l 


oo 


t~ 


l> 


rH 


m 




CM 


in 


CM 


o 


r~< 


■* 


in 










** 


IN 




o 


0) 


l-t 












CM 






CM 


CO 





r4 


01 


•H 
+-> 

rt 
U 

Si 



r-< 

O 

o 






in 



o 


in 
a 



•H 

in 

c 




D, 


& 

o3 

in 

c 


a 








■P 


•H 






•rl M 


>. 





as 


>, 






•H 


> 






> 


rl 


to 


<-t 


rt 






<H 


■rl 






r< in 





u 


ft 


rH 









U 






a 


+-> 







+J 






13 








CO 


3 


ft 


a 


s 






o 


o3 


in 




Q, 


J3 




o 






CQ 




h 


H-> 


rH x en 


■H 


o 


-H 




Q 







o 


C? 


C 


rt w c 


rl 


+J 


4-> 


+-> 


W 


O 





•H 


"O 





a o 


+■> 




rt 


G 


M 


a 





+^ 


w 


E 


SH -H 


c 


CO 


co 





fc, 


a 


>> 


o 







in in 


o 





a 


s 


1-1 


u 





•H 


U) 


Sh 


'n -C G 


o 


bL 





ft 


co. 


3 


rH 


rl 


a 


■H 


4-10 


i 


a 


a 


•H 


co 


in 


a 


4-> 


Rt 


+J 


ftOA 


a 


e 


g 


3 


< 


c 


1 


X 1 


fn 


a 




o 


cl 





D 1 


J 


t-H 


a 





OS 




z 


a 


u 


W 


U 








+J 














B 








^ 




146 











CD 
o 

G CD 
05 O l> 
rH +-> 01 
03 i-l 
CQ 



CD > 

U OJ 

C K 

OS O 

H -P Sh 

05 3 



co 

O CD 

C 3 

<* o c 

OJ > 

OQ CD 



•a 

§ £ 

as O 

H-P »1 

OS 0) 

cq pa 



<v 
■a 

c 

CD 

ft 



rH .Q 


oJ 


03 


4-> 


iH 





•H 


H 


nt 




> 




< 


s-l 




co 




m 


s 


ffl 





a 


u 


a! 


■H 



SH 

a> 

(0 o 

C 4-> 

as 



i 



0! 

ri C 

a o 

O 'H 

u -p 

ft a! 

a 

< 



o 

o 


00 
CD 


oo 
r- 

50 


lO 

00 



o o o 
mom 



o o o o CM 
o o o m oo 



cm in t> 


in in o t- o 


CO o t> 


cm in oo co en 


O O CD 


O t- O 00 CO 



cm oi ■-< 

■-I CD •* 

CO i-l 


■^ cm cn in in 

CM rH i-l 


o o o 
in o in 


o o o o o 
o o o m in 


cm in o 

IOOt- 
O O CD 


m in o t> o 

CM in 00 CO rH 

c- c- o oo m 


MOIH 
H CO ■* 
CO i-l 


CM i-l rH Tf 



o o o 

o o o 

o o 

in o o 

in en h 

01 CO rH 



o o o 
o o o 

o o o 
o o o 

o o 

in o o 

in 01 rH 

01 CO rH 



o o o o 

o o o o 

o o o o 

o o o m 

CO CD ■* CO 



o o o o 

o o o o 

o o o o 

o o o in 

CO CO ■* 00 



o o o 
in o in 


O O O O O 

o o o m in 


o o o 
o o o 


o o o o 
o o o o 


cm in t- 

mot- 

O O CD 


mmot-o 

CM in 00 CO rH 

i> t~ o oo in 


o o o 
o o o 
o o o 


o o o o 
o o o o 
o o o o 


CO Ol rH 

01 CD -^ 
CM i-< 


tji cm oi in t> 

CM rH rH Tf 


CO o o 

in 01 rH 
01 CO rH 


o o o in 

CO CD Tf 00 



o 
o 


CM 

CO 


CM 
CM 

CO 


m 

01 

t> 




o 

CO 
CM 




CM 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 
o 


CO 

in 

CD 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


in 


o 


CD 






o 


CO 


I-l 


01 




CM 



eg 
w 
a in 

CO C B) 

a o3 c 
w J 

O -P rH 

rH CO O Sh 

> CO CD 

« Sh J3 P 

W CO O 03 

CO -P CO S 

s 

Eh w 

CQ 

W 

a 



CO o 
c J co 
a a 



c 

03 1/1 

Ul Q G 

c J os 

03 Q 

Q CO J 
►J bO 

03 P 

u a co 

CO -H CO 

S (J 'h 

CO Sh P 

CO Q CO 



O >> OS OS 


C C 6 >> 03 


Ul 





^%$S 


O CO 03 i-l P Q 

•riccncooG coiJ 


a 


ft 


03 


3 


• <H 


PS C CJ Jl • <H 


3 


afl as ■ >> 


ft Q 03 03 Q bO OS • 

EjQQOrl'Ono" 
CO ij M 60 rH CO 




T3 co a* U 




CO 


r-l O 03 


>> 


3 


CQ O < U 


T3 rH 03 +-> CQ o <c 


fn 


to 


•H O 


CO Sh !h C CO -H 


03 


CO 


•riflft 


bjococo-hco -rH-a 


U 


HH 


a x> a b 


.G-PSa3S-iG.QG 


O 




3 3 03 CO 


•OOa3CDSH-P33aS 


ft 


•o 


CWSMQWSftJ 


a 


c 




o 


CO 







CQ 


H 


CQ 



147 



a <o 



is 
t» 

CM 

CM 

O 



<u 




> 


o 




0) 


c 




OS 


nl 







rH 


+> 


u 


ed 




3 


OJ 




CO 


<o 




(1) 


o 




=1 


c 




c 


a 





<D 


i-i 


+J 


> 


03 




fl> 


aj 




OS 

■a 


0) 




a 







p 


c 




<H 


at 







rH 


+■> 


w 


nf 




a) 


OJ 




K 



m 


Tf 


m 


CM 


•<* 


m 


00 


en 


en 


CO 


m 


C~ 


00 


CO 


rH 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CO 


r- 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CN 


CO 


rH 


o 


to 


m 


CO 


co 


in 


00 


CM 


CN! 


CN 


en 


r» 


05 


!•- 


rH 


m 


in 


t- 


w 


m 


CO 


m 


m 


in 


in 


CM 


o> 


CO 


CO 


m 


C~ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


co 


CO 


X 



CO 

-r 

CXI 

10 

CO 



co 
o 

CO 



■a 
aj 
•a 
a 

4) 

a, 



in 


CO 


00 


m 


CO 


in 


CM 


o 


Ol 


en 


CM 


CO 


CM 


rH 


rH 


t- 


co 


t> 


CO 


t> 


CO 


t- 


m 


t> 


r> 


CO 


\> 


rH 


t» 


■* 


in 


rH 


CO 


CO 


en 


■* 


CO 


co 


in 


05 


rH 


o 


o 


CO 


t> 


CM 


CM 


CD 


<* 


o 


en 


CD 


■* 


O 


m 


00 


m 


r> 


Tt< 


CM 


-* 


CO 


rH 


CN 


» 



o 


>n 


rH 


■* 


00 


t- 


en 


CO 


m 


en 


r-t 


CO 


CO 


CO 


in 


00 


00 


tc 


CO 


00 


o 


CO 






CM 


CO 


H 



CO 
■H rH 
Ct Si 
-P CS 

S^ 
H -H 

cS 

> 
< 



CM 


-* 


CM 


t> 


O 


o 


o 


•* 


CM 


CM 


cn 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


c~ 


en 


o 


CM 


in 


HI 


t> 


00 


■* 


o 


o 


CO 


rH 


m 


en 


en 


o 


en 


CD 


CO 


CD 


o 


CO 


CO 


rH 


en 


m 


m 


00 


m 


t> 


CM 


rH 


as 


rH 


in 


m 


CO 


CM 


•* 


CD 


o 


in 


o 


en 


m 


CD 


05 


rH 


CD 



en 


rH 


en 


'j' 


in 


CM 


rH 


o 


•* 


00 


o 


H 


CO 


•* 


rH 


Tf 


in 


co 



u 

■H 
01 

a o 



co 


CO 


en 


in 


CO 


CM 


in 


o 


f- 


CM 


CO 


O 


o 


CO 


CN 


CO 


CO 


in 


CM 


en 


o 


CM 


m 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


CM 


00 


•* 


■* 


^p 


00 


CM 


CO 


CM 


o 


o 



■* 


in 


o 


o 


o 


X 


m 


00 


CN 


m 


en 


CO 


o 


CD 


rH 


in 


C- 


r- 


o 


o 


X 


CO 


CM 


rH 


H 


t> 




rH 


rH 


CM 



I 

■H 

U W 

a c 
o o 

U -H 
B.-P 

a a 



rH 


en 


X 


rH 


CO 


C~ 


en 


m 


X 


o 


rH 


t» 


CO 


N 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 


•* 


•* 


en 


CO 


CO 


o 


"tf 


m 


<tf 


CM 


o 


CM 


CD 


o 


■* 


C~ 


en 


CO 


rH 


rH 


CO 



m 


o 


to 


CO 


rH 


CM 


X 


en 


CO 


m 


■* 


co 


o 


CO 






CO 


co 



rH 


CD 


X 


en 


en 


CD 


CO 


CM 


05 



CJ 

(* 0t> 

rH U 05 
CS <H rH 

CO 





o 


o 


CM 








■* 


05 




o 


o 






in 


CO 


rH 








in 


■* 




CO 


o 






in 


t» 


t~ 








CO 


o 


w 


rH 


o 






05 


t- 


05 


r-l 






o 


CO 


-I 


CO 


o 






rH 


m 


X 


<C 






CM 


rH 


o 


oom 


X 








*> 




x 






■V 


■t 


o 


H - 


n 








l> 




o 

a 

CO 

1H 

a 






CM 


•* 


ss 

CJ 
CO 


00CD 
M 


rH 
rH 




H 








w 










1H 


E-« 






SS 








H 




00 






z 


Z 






w 








w 




w 








W 






s 








<s 




c; 






S 








z 


x 






s 




rH 






H 


w 






OS 


w 


6m 






S3 


> 






o 


CJ 






w 


tH 


H 


CO 


°M 


H 


PS 






t; 


HH 


(-1 


w 


> 


o 


w 


fcs 




i-l 


w 






■v. 


> 


M 


o 


(5 


z 


In 


os 


z 


< 


w 






Z 


os 


rH 


IH 


M 


w 


< 


o 


o 


W 






X 


o 


w 


IK 


> 




a 


X 


s 


M 


X 


w 




w 


HH 


X 


rH 


OS 


-1 


< 






H 




z 


00 


HH 


H 




X 


w 


< 




u 


u 


< 


o 


< 


<-l 


OS 


< 


o 


X 


X 


PS 


In 




rH 


H 


rH 


PS 


o 


< 


W 


HH 


3 




w 


(X. 


r-l 


l-l 


rH 


1-1 


w 


o 


PS 


PS 


►J 


H 


z 


< 


CO 


0J 


^ 


m 


H 


X 


ffi 


CJ 


eg 


CJ 


03 


w 


H 


D 


D 


«aj 


3 


5 


o 


M 


w 


s 


5^ 


W 


o 


00 


tx 


0. 


00 


U, 


X 


-I 


as 


a, 


5 


P 



X 
CM 



148 



CD 

CJ 

C CO 

co p t> 
rH o> 

(0 rH 

00 



IM CO 
00 o 

CO CO 
CO t> 

I> 



05 lO rH 

co t> x 

Q0 rH -tf 



omo* 

O rH O 00 

CO t> CM CO 
O rH N 00 
05 r-l CD rH 



> 

O 0) 

S3 OS 

co o 

rH P ^ 

a 3 

CO CO 



o 
o 


o 

rH 


CD 
X 


CO 


o o ■* 

O O CM 


in rH 
CO 00 


o 


05 

05 


o 

oo 


m 


CO 
rH 


o 


oiom 

lO CO l> 
CM O CO 


rH 00 
■tf CD 
CM CO 


o 
o 

CO 


CM 

en 

CM 



0) CU 

O 3 

C S3 

st ID 

rH P > 



73 

0) c 

O 3 

a fe 
cj o 

rH -P 10 

CO 0) 

00 OS 



73 

0) 
73 
(3 


a 



cu 

rH 
H Si 
cO cs 

■P rH 

O -H 

H tO 

> 



















CO C- 00 05 


o 


O O rH 


CO O 




^ 


00 








CO O O 00 


Tjl 


O O O 


CD O 




CD 


CM 








CM CO 05 00 


CO 


o o t- 


O rH 




CO 


CM 








■* CD IM rH 


m 


o o ■* 


O CD 




m 


CD 








05 i— i in in 


r-t 


r> o o 


o in 




^f 


t> 














n « 






* 








o o m cm 


05 


CM t> 


O CM 




rH 


CO 








t> rH t> 


m 


rH 


r-t 




CM 


m 








rH 


CM 


CM CD rH 


CO O CM 


o 


CD CD 


CD 


05 O 


o 


«* 


05 CD 05 O 


t> 


00 o o 


05 O ■* 


H 


CO 00 


m 


CM O 


O CM 


OS O 00 O 


<* 


CO CD t> 


X O CO 


^ 


•-< CO 


00 


o o m m 


HC0t-O 


co 


CO t- •« 


co oo in 


in 


CM rH 


i-{ 


Tt< m co 


t~ 00 00 05 o 


05 


t> t> o 


in ■* C5 


■* 


05 r-i 


o 


NNOnMOOOO 


CD 






















rH C- 


O H CM 




rH CM 


05 


05 


rH 




CD rH m o 


m 


r-t r-i 


l-l 




CM 


co 


r-< 






t> rH O 


rH 



05 00 CM 
05 t> 00 
CM CO C- 



05 
05 


O 

o 


o 

CD 


o o 


CM CO CD 
05 O rH 
CM 05 ■* 


O CD 
O CO 
O 05 



■* 00 CM O CM 
CO CO 



U 

m o 
c u 

u 



Sh 

CU 
■H 

in o 
a -p 
co 



il 

•H 

in in 
a a 
o o 

u -H 

a-p 
a co 
< 



CD 








CM CD rH 


co 


O CM 


O 




CD 


co 


co 


o 








00 


o o 


05 


O ■* 


rH 




CO 


oo 


w 


c 


E-* 






















■ 


eg 


t> 






co 


CD t> 


00 O c-j 


•tf 




rH 


CO 


oo 


i-H 


U 05 






co 


t> ■* 


CO 


oo m 


m 




CM 


rH 


H 


co 


■H •-! 






l> 


t> O 


in ■* 05 


>* 




05 


rH 


O 


CQ 








rH 

o 
o 
si 



CO 

si 


croft School 11, 
st School Addition 17, 
st Jr. High 


o 

rH 


st School Renov. 1, 
aw. Playgrounds 2, 
herty & Shawsheen 




c 

0) 

cu 

Si 

to 
s 

CO 

Si 

CO 

«8 

>> 

p 
u 

cu 

J2 


r-H 
CM 

W 


CM 

CO 
U 

CU 

i-H 

a: 
c 

•rl 

Sh 

a 
co 

■p 

<H 



tl 
o 

c 


05 
CD 










bfl C CD CO 


ho cu si o 




o 


a 


« 












■H 


CO i£ W 


S3 S CO Q 




Q 


CO 












S3 CD 


■H 








•H 
















CO 00 


rH 


05 O CM 




co 


P CO 












■* 


t> CO CD 


cu co c- t- 




r- 


CS 


» 








in 




CDCDO)O573050505 


CO 05 


> 05 








CU 




05 


05 rH i-H 





rH i-H r-t 


a 


r-H 


H 








r-t 




rH 


rH 


e 




cd 




C 



















cu 




rH 




CU 










•iH 






-CQmcSfli^^ftinn;^ 








■P 




CO 


rH 00 rH 




05 rH ■* 




rH 




■* 








U 


DO 
























< rH 


P 


■p p -p 




P -P +-> 




■P 




+J 










o 


u 


h U rH 




U !h U 




h 




Sh 








rH 


o < < < < 




<< < 




< 




< 








CIS -C 
























•H 



























O W 
























CD 


























a 


























CO 























0500Tf05C005CO 
CMOOCM050X05 

oomioHnMc 
^•mcoi>XOTa505 
t>CMOcot>mxa5 



05 rH 


CO 


r-t in rH 


r-t 


C- 


rH [> 




r-t 


rH 


a 




P 


■H 




A! 


3 




a <s 


<y 


& 


as m 


u w 


a 


Eh rH C 


■rl P 


■p 


rH -H 


o c cu 


co 


CU CU « 


> O r-t 


>> 


0C S S 


U -H P 


CO 


CD 
U J Sh 


CU P 3 




CO nj O 


u 


o CU 


CU P 


CU 10 


HH CO -P 


OS CO -P 


p a 


CO C cs 


o 


a -h 


■H S 


■P P 3 S C3 


Ml M 


'H'H Sh 


s 


S3 SH 


OOP 


CO 


•H rH 


Jh fH CO 


P Sh 


rhl( 


o o c 


a cu 


C CU P 


C G O 73 P 


■H +-> CO 


Id rt U 


a C3 


ns nj S3 
ft*H 


CQ CQ 


3 i£ 


CM 






r~ o i> 


CM CO CO CO ■* 


co r- O) 


r- t~ 


r~ t> t~ 


05 05 rH 


05 05 05 05 05 


r-t r-t 


r-t i-H 


HHH 


- «< 


« - 


- .. ^ 


CO CO CO 


rH CO Tf r-t CM 


rH CM rH 


CM CM 


CM CO r-t 



p-ppppppp 

^SH^tlt<^(H(HSH 

c«<:<<<<<<:<3; 



149 



05 O O CD rH 

05 o co in o 


CD 
i-H 


CM CD CD i-H CD 
05 o r-t in CD 
CM 05 TF X 05 


CO 
CO 


■* X CM O CM 

r-t 


(35 
CM 



u 

> 00 

o a 

73 S3 
S3 -H 
< CCS 

Sh CO 

■PQ S 

W Tt 

CU rH CS 
5= rH U 
•H O 
!« <H 
CU 73 73 

s a CSS 

CU CS o 
CO J OS 



X r-t r-t ■<■)< CO 

co r- t~ t> t~ 

05 05 05 05 05 



+J +J 4-> -P P 

u u u u u u 

CU < < <c < < 

& 

CD 
CO 



Sh 


CU 


CU 


s 


r£ 


0) 


CI) 


U) 


CO 






u 


CI) 


9i 


rH 


> 


CS 


o 


> 73 


73 


(3 


h 


<c 


« 




i-H 


p 


rH 


HI 


cs 


0) 


DO S 




O 

a <s> 

« or- 






> 





a) 


a 


OS 


cs o 




rH +-> 


!h 


cs 


3 


cq 


C/J 








o 


3 


a 


a 


a) o 


0) 


rH P 


> 


CS 


(i) 


CQ 


« 




n 


0) 


C 


o 


3 


c o 


£ 


cS P 




rH 


(A 


cS 


1) 


CQ 


CC 


•a 




a 




■a 




a 




0) 




ap 




X 




w 





'.0 


t» 


CO 


o 


O r~ 


m 


-t 


co 


H 


m 


o 


O CM 


CM 


f- 


en (N co o o oo 


m 


CM 



f- 00C0t>CMCMO5r>00 

CO HIOIOCDCOHH 



CT> 


CO 


CM 


00 


rf 




en 




00 





t> O T> r-t 
CO t> ■* 00 

in CN CN 



05 05 05 
h< 05 co 


rH 


oo o in o cm oo 

rH 0) m O I s - CO 


CO 


oo oo oo 
m co •* 
cn m m 


CO 
t> 

co 


l»CBOOQO) 
CO Tf 00 O CO CM 


CO 
CO 

m 










cm in 


00 

I)" 


CC 1* rH O CM rH 

rH oo in 

rH 


(0 

m 

CM 


00 


00 






m 

CM 


m 

CO 
CM 







H 
CO 


rH 
CO 


in 
o 


00 CM 
CM CD 


rH 

m 


rH 

m 


m 

rH 


O O 
CN 05 

co r> 










•* 


H^ 


CO 


CM 00 
O 



CD 
rH rH 

cs s) 
-P cS 

O rH 

H -H 

CS 

> 

< 



CM 


m 


m 


H 


m 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


CM 


in 


cn 


oo 


CM 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


O 


r> 


CD 


r> co o o o in o 


in 


t> CO 


rH 


in 


o 


o o 


CM 


o 


t> 


rH 


05 CM 


t- 


o 


o o 


m 


o 



OOCOOOCMCMOt--* Hi 

rHincOCDH/rHCN CM 

rH -H 



co r» o o <n in o 
oo oo t- o cn t- o 

t> O in rH oo o 

CD t> ■* oo oo o 
m cm cm o> o 

en m 
cm cm 



co oi en o 
■* ■* o o 


CO 

05 


00 o o o o o 

HOllCOOO 


co 

CD 


m oo oo o 
co m co o 
CM cm m o 


CN 

05 

o 


Momooo 
cct-mooo 

CO'JOIOOO 


ffi 

rH 
rH 










CM o 

m 


CO 

m 


co if t> o m o 

rH 00 m rH 
rH CO 


m 



u 



E 

to o 

a u 

CS <H 



^ 



rH 

CD 
<H 

to O 
a p 

crj 
H 
fH 



ta 
■p 
a 



u to 
a a 
o o 
u -h 

Q.P 

a cs 



OllOO 
00 CM O 

co m o 



CD 

o 
c B 

cS O ■>* 
rH u r> 

CS <H 05 
CQ rH 



cm inmrHinooo 

CM in 05 00 CM O O O 



o 


r~ 


CD 


r^ 


CO 


o 


O rH 


m 


r» 


CO 


rH 


m 


O O rH 


t- 


rH 


C35 


CM 


t> 


O 


O CO 



t- o o cm in 
co oo t> o 05 t> 

oo 

• t» o m rH oo 

co r> h< oo oo 

m CM CM 05 

05 
CM 



m oo oo o 
co m CD CD 
cm cm in oo 



00 o o o o 


00 


rH 05 CD O O 


CO 


t> co m o o 


05 


cot-moo 


rH 


CD H< 05 O O 


r-\ 






cd ■* r> o m 


•^ 


rH oo m 


CO 









73 CO 




















>> 


03 




















CO 


to BBS an 




















5 


-P POOOCOrH 






faD 














43 


> tfl CO -H -H -H -H -H -H 




u 


C3 









•o 






M 


fn P P P P cS +j j3 




CD 


■H 




to 




11 fi 

■p to tfl a 






■H 


Q.>HOOOrHfJ M 




•p 


H 




3 








S3 


£!( 1)33 3ft p« 

HH Q, > t( ^ H H > 




G 


O CD 
P O 




CO 

S3 JS 




•HP >, P J 
W Q ^0 
►J cS (J 








E -H +-> P P J3 P C3 




U 


•H -H 




o o si 








o 


CDrHOiCOt/imWJt/ia 






C tfl rH E tfl 




B X -H -P 




■H U rH 






c 


bo a c e: -h a 




>. 


!h O (j P 




CS rH +-> CS 




CS Si CS >. 






3 


CS -1000033010 




■P 


.-: CD 0, -h £i 




Q Q cs CQ 




O tfl -H O 






>-5 


IhPPOOO u^ 

CCS CO C o3 rH 




CD 
♦H 


+J M 00 
CD CD CD O Al -H 




> 
TJ T3 O 73 




J3 E-i J E-i Q 

CJ H-> 






rH 


O id o o o o a 




CO 


c s a ?h o J 




C S3 S3 S3 




CO . -H - • • 






rH 


H 6O5O5O>t0O5 S 




CO 


O CS a 3 









tyco o* cs* cr 






0) 


C CD CD tO © 






£1 ocE-i >i o 
a S3 >. H -H 




a a cs a 




?h O O O o 






s 


s>coaaaoo.T3 




o 








< rH < < < 






3 


O-HnJcScarjSfHrt.H 




•H 


CD -H O P *H 




10 CO CO 




Ph 






HcaWx!J3X!CJx;cO 




rH 


rH X CD CD CD "H 




a a cio a 




T3 73 T3 T3 








CJ CJ o o 




£1 


Sh T3 <H ^ CS 




E E T3 s 




■a B£ b e a 






CD 


O O O •* Tjt 

r-r>OrHCMcot>-tft> 




3 
Oh 


Eh CS -H CS -H U 

a > CO Ph P 




o o o a 
a a J a 




C cS o cS cS a 

u»ato J j j 


to 




C5 


o>0)05t>t>t>05r>05 






rH 






S3 J 


CD 




rH 


rHrHrH050505rH05rH 




05 


r> co co co co ■* 




O rH CO ■* 


O 


00 O CM CO ■* 


rH 






rH rH rH rH 




CD 


05 t> r> |> t> t> 




r~ r~ t> t^ 


■H 


co co t> r> i> t> 


o 




•■ 


-v « as >. *v 


>>oi 


rH 05 05 05 05 05 




05 05 05 05 


P 


CO 05 05 05 O 05 


■H 







<C < O - - -rH --3H 


+-> 


rH 


rH rH rH rH rH 




rH rH rH rH 


■H 


05 rH rH rH rH rH 


■P 


to -* 


coM'incDcocoinco'* 


CD 




n 






tfl 


rH 


rH 


> 






SH 


•• 




S3 


f. *k M m 


■H 




< 


a 


•p 


-p-p-p-p-pp-ppp 


cdTfm<;orHCN< 


00 rH in rH 


3 


-< in t> < 00 




S 


u 


uuuuuuuuu 


MHH^IHHHTJ 


•H 


CO CD CO CO 


C3"rH -^ rH CO CM TS< 


rH X) 


<c<<<:<<<<:< 








P 




o 




CS 


bX 






o 


•P 


■P +-> P -P H-> ■¥> 


CS 


H-> -P -P +-> 


< -P -P H-> P -P P 


•H 


■H 






•H 


H 


H H H Sh Jh Sh 


CD 


H !h h U 




f-i U H fi U U 


O 33 






rH 


< < "■: i.- 


M < < < < 


■o < 


CD 








£) 






o 




S3 




a 

CO 








& 




150 


CD 

(a 




cS 





<u 
o 

3 to 
d O t> 

rH -p cn 

CTJ r-l 

CQ 



OrHooooom 
omooooocM 


OrHOOOOOrH 

ooioinmmmsi 
otomcor>mr>oo 



00 CO rH iH rH 



O O CM 


CM 


O 


to 


m co •* 


rH O C- 




00 CO TP 


in 


O 


cn 


CM O CM 


CO o t^ 


to 
in 


Tti cn cn 


CO 


r-l 1 


1 CM 


1 r-4 CM CO 1 


i to o cj> 


Ht-lfl 


to 


1 


1 tO 


cm m to i 


1 TJI O CJ) 


to 


tO CO 


in 




CO 


m ih co 


t> O CO 


•* 














m 


CO 00 


eg 




CO 


CM rH iH 


in cm 


* 


IM CO 


ID 










co 



<u 






CJ 




> 


3 







d 


o « 


rH 


-p 




rt 




Sh 


CQ 




3 
W 


0) 




(1) 


CJ 




3 


c 




C 


d 





(1) 


rH 


-p 


> 


d 




0) 


CO 




-a 







c 


u 




3 


3 




in 


nJ 


o 




rH 


■1-1 


01 


d 




a> 


CQ 




W 


XI 













■v 






3 






<U 






a 






X 






w 







© 

rH rH 
CIS .Q 

■P d 
OH 

Eh -H 



OH.OO 

onoo 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o m 

O CM 


O rH O O 

o cn o in 
o to m co 


O O O rH 

in in in o 
r> in c~ oo 





rH in 

m to 


to 

rH 


oo m co 
m m m 


rH 




•* CO 
■* CO 
CM 00 


CO 
t> 

o 


rH CO o 
O CO CO 
CM l> rH 


O 

r> 

o 














CO o 

CO rH 


■* 
•* 


rH tO rH 
rH tO 


CJ) 


ID 


rH in 

in to 


to 

rH 


oo in o 

CO CO o 


CO 
CM 


CM 
00 


* CO 
tp CO 
CM 00 


CO 

o 


to t> o 

rH rH O 
CM ■* O 


CO 

to 












in 

CO 


CO o 

CO rH 


■* 
•* 


rH O O 
rjt o 


rH 



CJ) o 
m o 

oo o 

rH O 

o 



O CM 
O CJ) 
O rH 



o 
m 


m 
r> 


CO 0) 

o to 


CO 

o 


in 

o 


CO 

m 

oo 


00 

t> 


co co 

t> CJ) 

co co 


co 

rH 


rH 

to 


IN 








•* 



OOOOtOOOCOitfrHCOOOO 

©minoomoocMtoooooo 

rHCOOOOCMOOCMCOCMCOOOC- 
inrHOlDtOOiniOCJ>t>'3<OrH 

co onoiOHCOHntDo^ 1 



It) 




in 


in 










o 


o 
















03 




CM 
rH 


CM 
rH 










o 
o 


o 
o 
















■H 




CJ) 


CJ) 










o 


o 
















U 03 




oo 


oo 










o 


o 
















p. s 




- 


- 










- 


- 





















00 


oo 










o 


o 
















S* -H 




rH 


rH 










o 


o 
















a-p 
















r-i 


r-l 
















P. d 

< 




































O rH O O O O O 


rH 




rH in 


to 




co in 


CO 




o 


O CJ) 


O CD CJ) O CO ^< rH 


00 


O O O 


O 


CJ 
CJ 




o in o o o o o 
O rH o o o o o 


in 

rH 




m to 

■^ CO 


rH 
CO 




CO 00 

to r> 


CM 




o 

rH 


m m 


ocnmoocMtoooooo 


■* 


co co 


O CM t> O CM CO CM 


CO 


o o r> 


CM 


s E-* 




o cn o in m m in 


CJ) 




1 ■* CO 


t> 




rH rH 


CO 






m t-i 


o co to o m to cj> 


r> 


f OH 


•* 


d r> 




o to m co r> in r> 


o 




1 CM CO 


o 




CM Tf 


to 






00 


O CO CJ) O rH CO rH 


CO 


OO* 


CO 


rH ^ CJ) 






- 




- - 


•* 




•. ■, 


" 






- 


*.-•.*.*.*. 




- - - 


- 


d <H rH 




m o r> t- to cm to 


r> 




CO O 


■* 




rH O 


rH 






CM 


CO CO 00 CO rH CJ) 




rH in CM 


rH 


CQ 




tion 8 
3 
zulla 

Land 1 

Land 
y Land 1 


to 

rH 




CO rH 


•* 




•* 
U) ID 


•* 






rH 

rH 
rH 

d 


■o 

CQ 

03 • rH 

CJ -P iH 

P, 0) -P 3 CJ 




03 

3 3 
d 

rH -H 


in 






r3H N 41 3 






CJ 3 






a c 






bfiK 


03 3 -H -H ^ 




ft 03 








> -O CTJ rH >, rH 






3 03 






•H 'H 






3 




•H CO d M O 


•-< 


rH 03 








Sh a U >> d >>rH 






3 -rl 






d Rl 






•H 


3 


Q -H S 3 J 





3 -rl 








CJ 3 -P Sh 






•H <H -P 






Si !h 






>: 


■£ 03 


■P r-l -H £ 


^ 


(. E 








DlfeMQftQO 






■P ID CJ 






Q Q 






h 


CJ 


CJ d rH 03 J^ 03 ^ 


+J 


■P -H E 








a 






OE O 












d E-i C 


03 U -H ^ tc -P 


3 


3 -P O 








osssssss 






0) rH 






■a "o 






P, 


•H 


3 <H d £ CQ 





O -H O 








oooooooo 






rH 3 rH 






cs Ctj 








03 x; 


(h p,T3 +j a bD 


o o 








•rl -H -H 'H -H 'H 'H 






■H =£ 






O 10 






c 


3 CJ 


O 3 -H -P 




TJ rH 








• +-> -P -P -P -P -P -P 






o 






K BK 






3 


Oder; dSrHjo 





< d 








0*ddddddd 






O rH 






•H 






a 


•H s 


rH »J rH 3 


+J 


■P O 








o>>>>>>> 






CJ 






rH d rH 








■p 


-rH tJ3 d CJ P, 


■H 


•H >>-H 








<^hrHh!H^^ 






"H bo 






rH ^ rH 






rH 


d M 


3 -H >> 3 S3 -rl -P 


3 


3 !h ^ 








CD CJ CJ (1) CJ CJ 






03 O d 






d Q d 






d 


3 3 


*H CB -H "H 03 


cr 


D" d 








7303030303030303 






3 XJ 






■p +J 






-P 


p, -n 


■H "O > X 3 <H 3 


in 


03 U +J 








'BSSSS3SS 






<h -p Sh 






IB -O 03 






c 


CJ +J 


hD-C ^ m ? d 





J2 03 








dOOOOOOO 






CJ 3 ctl 






C d C 






OJ 


-P 


0d3dOrnOS 


S -H -H 








JUUOUUOU 






OS O O 






H OH 






« 


rH>aS K JCOP,HE-' 




rJ 03 




















a 








< 


CM 


CM 


CO 








OrHCMCMCOCOCOin 






CO CO CO 






CM ■* 






O) 


o 


rH rH rH rH rH CM t> 


i> 


r> CO CO 






03 


*>t-t>t>r>t>r>t~ 






l> t> l> 






t> CO t~ 






to 


ot>r>c-t>t>r>t>CJ)Cj)Cj)t>t> 






CJ 


CCJ)CJ)CJ)CJ)CJ)CJ)CT)CJ) 






CJ) CJ) CJ) 






CJ) t> CJ) 






CT) 


r>cj)Cj)Cj)Cj)Cj)Cj)Cj)i— i 


rH 


rH CJ) CD 






rH 


OrHrHrHrHrHr-lrHiH 




rH 


rH rH r-l 






rH CJ) rH 






rH 


CJ) rH 


rH rH rH rH rH rH 




rH rH 






O 
•H 
■P 


•H 
ltJt>CJ)rHCMCJ)Or-ICO 




d 
W 










rH 




03 

3 





rH 


- 


- 


" 








m to o 






W -rH 




00 


-CO COintOCJ)tOCQCMTt<rHT}<^< 






h 


>COCOCOCOCO**rH 




p.m in m 






rH CJ) rH 




ID 


CM 


0) rH 


CM CM CM CM in rH CM 


CM 


rH rH CO 






< 


h 




w 












a 


















Cj-p-p-p-P-P-P-P-P 




•H 


■P -P -P 




CJ 


■P -P -P 




Bj 


4-J 


•P P 


-p +J -P +J +J +J +J 


•P 


P -P -P 






rH 


ni^uui-iu^uu 




Q 


u u u 




hi 


^ >H tn 




rH 


h 


u u 


U U U U U U U 


rl 


U *W U 






d 


C < <1 <C <C < <<<! 






<<< 




d<<< 




rH 


< < 






t\ 







CJ 






c 






0) 
















CJO 




p 






•rl 






CJ 























DO 






cti 






03 
















P. 






d 






h 






•H 
















CO 






■* 






Q 


151 




s 

















CD 




o 




cm m t> © 


O CD 


CO 




in 




o 




HNOIO 


CO o 


in 





CD 




<* 




00 r4 CN O 


C- m 


in 


o 


■* 




m 




o m oo o 


00 00 


r4 


C CD 


in 




CO 




o oo'to m 


O Tt< 


m 


(8 O C» 


M 








* - « 


M - 


•» 


r-l P O 


CD 








•>s< co m 


m t> 


CO 


« rH 


rH 








in 


i-i 


o 


OQ 














rH 


(1) 


0) 


m 




CO 






O 


> 


t~ 


CO 




o 






in 


a <d 


• 












• 


as O K 


00 


CD 




CD 






rH 


|H +> 


t- 


o 




r^ 






CD 


a u 


rH 


rH 




o 






CO 


co 3 


~ 






•• 






•» 


OT 


o 

CM 






r~ 









CMt-OlClCOt-COCD 
cocoaiCM00rHt~r- 

COCDOOM'OCDCOCM 
OO" 0)Ot-COM 
CNCNOOOOOCOinO) 



co m 

CO rH 

m in 



i-icooocomodcDin cm co 
HinMHN<cmoo coo 

rH rH Tl< CM rH rH 



to o o> m oi oo 
oi ^ oi in tj< ^ 



t> o cm t> in m 
<* o o t> co co 

O CO CN rH rH CN 



o 


CO 


CD 
CO 


r-l 
CD 


CN 


O 



CD <D 

O 3 

a a 

OS 

rH P > 

a © 

pa k 



T3 

a fc 
cs o 

H-P IB 
OS CD 



c 
<u 
a 
x 
w 



o ■* oo m co 
o ai oo t> o 



CD CO rH 00 O 0)O 

01 CM 01 ^< rH •* O 

oo en ■* rH oo m o 

rH CN rH t» rH O 



CN •* 

rH r-i 

ci in 



oo o cn ■* m rH m 

CN ■* CD 0) t> CO ci 


CO rH Ol 
rH C~ m 


CN CD 01 00 00 rH in 

co in m O) oo m in 
c- rH tj< cm ai ■* m 


00 O rH 

t> t- t> 

O O 00 



co oi m t> ai ■# f~ 

m in co cm h 

CN co 



CD 
r-< 
.Q 
rH IS 
CCS r-< 
■P -H 
O a! 
H > 


O 

CN 
CO 

rH 

m 


o in 

O CD 


oooooooo 

OOOOOOCDO 


O O 
O O 


m 

CD 


O CD 

o o 

O r^ 
CD 


0000000)0 

mooooo^o 
cNOinommmo 

Nom^t- o 

CN CO r-t 


O O 
O o 
o o 

l> o 
•-f CN 


00 
t> 

o 



cot-ooor-cDoococDcom cm 

inTjiCDt-OOlCDOrHCNCO 0) 

oocor-nomcNaicNoo'^oo in 

rHOlWCDinOlrHOOt-CO-* CO 

OCOincOrHOrHOlOCOC- "Cf 

OlinoO'CfCDCO'^in'^rHTt' t> 

corHt>cNinint»oo'ci , '*o <* 

Ti< rH -<tf mrH rH CM CO 



u 

CD 

<H E 

to o 

c u 

ai sh 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 

o 
co 








o 




(1) 




as 




i 

■H 




u 


in 


u a 





o 


u 


•H 


a-p 


Q. a 


< 





cooooooooo 

■^OOOOOOCDO 



o o 
o o 



ooooooooio oo 
aimooooo^o oo 
cocNomommmo oo 



cm cn o m <ct< CD 



■*^ooNom 
o ■•* o o m o cn 


O CO 
O O 


CO X ■"C* O 01 O rH 

o^Honocs 

O rH CM O rH O 00 


O !> 

o ai 

O Ol 



■ oi co m co o oo 

CO 




O 

a e tc 
a ot- 

rH ^ 01 
C3 <H rH 

m 



O CD S> 
O O 01 
O rH CD 



CDCOCDOOOOlOOrH 
W^rHt^OCOCDin 


CD CO CM 
rH CM CD 


OOOCOCDincOOlrH 
rHOlCO-^minrHOl 

OCO^HHOlrlO 


00 "* rH 

i> co m 

O CO I> 



O)l>01rHrHCO'Cfl>-*rHTj> 

cooocnoco co co •* ■* m 

CO rH CO CM rH 



bO O 








S3 O 
•H 








r-< -P J3 








•H 00 








O >> -rt 








CCOtOrH S X-PCffl 








3rlH C( IB rH BH 








OHH J) K CH • l-i 


QD 






CJ -H -H T3 bfl S OS ^1 S -rt 


C 






CQOQrH-H 0BB'-3 003 


■H 




S3 


hi) M OT fH W 


+J 







3 - - a +> a - 


si 




rH -rt 


h ID It II) B, » (R H Dl 


bo 




ni -P 


Q^mifidoe ?h 


■H 




•H as 


N id O 3HSBS ol 


J 




S3 > 


• to tSl O" PS 






a u 


'-vS>h>-0 H I) IB >< 


P 







+-> OS OH U u 







■p <; to 


- i-lS ( S(d0'O'H-HSSi 







CHfi 


S3 00>0CaSaS O 


S-i 




CQ o 


• -H -h ^ J3 3 O, a o3 -H 


p 




o s o 


■^oaAOTOTOTasasmK 


ra 




•H 






CQ 1 1 


coco , ct* , ct < ^ , ^^ i ^^ , ^ 


m 


in m m 


CO B!t>l>r~l>c~r~t~t~t^t>Oi 


t- 


t> c- t> 


3oioiooicnoio)0)oiGirHaiGiO)Ci 


r-l Qr-lt-tr-lr-tr^rHr-l,-ir-lr^ 




rH 


rA rH i-i 


O 


T 1 






■P aS00CM<<l>O00CM00<O<<<:00 


SfH^mcOOlHCOHMCDH 


rH 


rH 


CM CD rH 


< rH 








0-P4J-P-P-P-P-P-P-P-P 


P 


■P 


■P -P J-> 


rHCJti^^SH^SHSH^^SH 


U 


Sh 


^1 SH SH 


ns co<<:<<<<<<:<<<:<<<<: 


■H -H 

















a 








OT 









■P Bi 

■H C CO 



152 



a 

CCS 

o 





to o o o 

<H C -H -H Q, 

OS 3 -P CO S3 

CO OT -H o< a( -h oi 

>» +J O > Q QSJrH 
OS O OS < U OS rH 

SH^S-H0 00C0 

00X!rHjHT3tOP-HO 
-P S OOil O S3 C tO OS CO 
aS0-H30alOoSSH-H 

SCOtafidiJUSQS 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1975 



Employees' Payroll Deductions: 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Blue Cross 

Group Life Insurance 

United Fund 

Savings Bonds 
School Aid: 

P.L. 874 

Title VIB 

Title VIB Project S8475 

Title III 

Title III 

P.L. 92-318 

Title I - E.S.E.A. 

Title II - E.S.E.A. 
State and County Assessments: 

County Tax 

Examination of Retirement System 

Ipswich River Watershed District 

Air Pollution Control 

Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 

Group Insurance - Elderly 

Group Insurance - Retired Teachers 

State Parks and Reservations 
Refunds : 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Water Rates and Services 

Miscellaneous 
Police Off-duty Details 
Police Legal Advisor 
Trust Funds 

Cemetery Perpetual Funds 
Other Refunds 
Purchase of Trash Bags 
Dog Licenses to County 
Sale of Dogs 
Walter Raymond Fund 
Petty Cash Advances 
Revenue Cash Investments 
Non-Revenue Cash Investments 
Temporary Loans: 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Federal Revenue Sharing Cash Investments 
Insurance Claim Recoveries 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 
Andover Athletic Program 
Miscellaneous 
Tailings 
Retirement System 

Non-Contributory Pensions 



1,539 


999.68 


402 


754.91 


115 


611.78 


21 


855.58 


3 


904.33 


20 


831.25 


129 


982.63 


19 


,286.79 


7 


191.45 


25 


,670.61 


14 


567.05 




284.75 


44 


,603.25 


11 


837.85 


627 


,889.65 


3 


,312.59 




769.90 


1 


,503.17 


3 


,049.20 




742.65 


15 


,966.99 


122 


,368.13 


56 


,812.73 




295.40 


18 


,282.55 


1 


,390.01 




705.15 


82 


,687.99 


14 


,189.32 


16 


,527.90 


6 


,650.00 




180.07 


54 


,091.20 


8, 


244.05 




78.00 




566.44 


1, 


700.00 


31,100, 


000.00 


1,000, 


000.00 


150, 


000.00 


1,480 


054.25 


1, 


349.22 


143, 


727.47 


306, 


393.72 


13 


775.84 




80.02 




94.05 


248 


868.00 


25 


428.50 



37,866.156.07 



153 





o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


■o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


CD -P 


o 


o 


o 


o 


3 CO 


•> 


•V 


•» 


». 


a cd 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD > 


o 


o 


in 


lO 


> c 


■* 


CM 


co 


01 



00 


oi 


00 


oi oo 
co m 


01 


01 
oo 


CO 
CO 
CN 


01 
CN 

co 


O) CO 
CO 00 


co 

CO 
CN 












eg 

CO 
CO 


o 
co 
m 


CM 
CTJ 

00 


CO CO 

in 

m 


o 
co 
in 


in 




m 









r-l 


o 


00 


CO 




00 


•* 


f- 


Tl< 




00 


o 


01 


01 




00 


00 


oo 


t~ 




•* 


■* 


rH 


t- 


CO 










H 


o 


o 


rH 


01 


CS 


01 


01 


m 


CN 


■P 


CO 


•* 


00 


o 


O 










H 


m 


00 
00 


00 


CO 



T3 




CD 




■P 




in 




bCI CD 




d > 




■H S3 




U i-i 




3 




s: 




ra 


CO 




CO 


CD i-l 


■ 


3 ni 


•* 


£3 U 


01 


CD 


CO 


> a 


« 


CD CD 


o 


PS o 


o 



m 

CN 


m 

CN 


o 
o 


in 

o 


m 
o 


o 
o 
o 








o 

X 


00 
CO 
CO 


CN 
H 
r-l 



O 


m 


oo 


in 


CN 


m 


Ol 


■* 


01 


Ol 


m 


CO 


rH 


o 


X 








CO 


o 


CO 


00 


co 




c- 


00 





c 


n! 


CD 


r-l 


e 


re 


CD 


CO 


to 




u 


bfl 


3 


a 


a 


•H 


w 


•a 


■H 


a 


Q 


H 



in 


Ol 


■^ 


m 


CN 


X 


r-l 


X 


01 


CO 


01 


CM 


l> 


X 


co 








01 


CN 


<N 


■* 


■* 


01 


CO 


CN 


X 



CN 

CM 


CO 

CO 


CO Ol 
O CO 






01 
«cf 


o 
o 

r-l 






r-l 





73 


CN 


CD 


• 


-P 


Tf 


CO 


CN 


CD 


rH 


■P > 


■« 


a c 


m 


re m 





CD iH 

e re 

-P Sh 

re cd 

cd a 

U CD 

B o 



CD 




3 


o 


a -o 


o 


CD CD 




> +-> 


o 


CD CO 


o 


03 CD 


o 


1 > 


•s 


c a 


o 


o <-* 


o 


55 


CN 



X 

CO 


r-l 

in 


CO 


t> 
o 
o 


01 

t> 

Ol 


CN 

in 

rH 








X 

© 

X 


in 
o 


t> 
O 
rH 



O 




a 




re 




re 
CO 




tm 




a 


CO 


■rl 


•P 


C5 


D. 


S 


■H 


■H 


CD 


hfl 


O 





CD 


DQ 


K 



Ol 


■* 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


CO 








CO 


CN 


CO 


in 


in 


in 


■* 


■* 


m 








rH 


CN 




m 


in 





CM 
CN 


Ol 

t> 


CN 
CO 


01 

CO 


1> 
CO 

o 


X 
01 

co 


rH 
CO 


Ol 

CO 










01 

in 


co 
m 


CN 

m 


CO 

in 

m 



■* 






» 


t> 






\ 


\ 




CO 


o 


r-l 




■p 


CO 


\ 




c 


V. 


t> 




CD 

6 


co 


M 


CO 


CD 


■t 


CD 


■p 


CO 





O 


a 


h 


o 


13 


•H 


3 


a 


re 


CD 


XI 


re 


r-t 


O 


10 


rH 


re 


CD 


•H 


re 


03 


« 


a 


co 



^< 






in 


» 






t> 


\ 






\ 


o 




CO 


o 


CO 




•P 


CO 


\ 




c 


\ 


co 






S 


CO 




CO 










■p 


CO 





o 


a 


r< 


o 


c 


•H 


3 


a 


re 





.Q 


a 


r-t 


o 


to 


!-t 


re 





-H 


re 


CO 


OS 


Q 


CO 



154 



w 



o m m o 


O 


CO 


CM 


O r-t OO vO 


<f 


CO 


<t 


• • • • 


• 


• 


• 


O 00 vO iH 


m 


CO 


<f 


OOiOPI 


vO 


i-H 


r~- 


O <!• iH vO 


vO 


vO 


<T 


«\ rt *t «s 


#% 


#\ 


r> 


O <i- CM vO 


CO 


r»» 


CM 


m (7i h r*> 


i-H 


CM 


CM 


CO i-H 1^ 


m 


CO 


i-l 



m 

c^ 
oo 

vO 
CT. 
CM 

00 



O 

<: 



CU 




co 
















4-1 




J-l 
















CO W) 




CO 


m 














^ e 




CU 


r^ 














•H 




>>o>. 














X 4J 






r-4 






T3 








CO CU 




h 




X 




CU 




CM 




4-1 CU 




o 


>■> cO 




T3 




o 


CO 


£ 




•H 


> 


H 




C 






4-1 


CU 


co 


J-l 


01 






CU 




co 


a 


cj C 


4J 


CU 


rJ 


>> 




& 




CO 


•H 


d 5 


a 






4J 




CO 


cu 


cu 


TJ O 


•H 


1 


X 


U 




CU 


c 


o 


CJ 


CU H 


CU 




CO 


a> 




c 


o 


X 


cu 


u 


CJ 


CO 


H 


a. 




3 


•r-l 


cu 


c* 


M-l 


CU 


CU 




o 






4J 






O O 


Pi 


4J 


CU 


u 


m 


M-l 


CO 


c 


T3 


4J 




CO 


4-1 


CU r- 


o 


•H 


•H 


CU 


CU 


T3 


e 


cO 




o> 




J-l 




4-1 


J-l 4-1 


CU 


•H 


4-1 


r-l 


i-H 


J-4 


a 


co 


CO 


CU O 


4-1 


4-1 


co 


cO 




CU 


O 


4-1 


£j 


M-l > 


CO 


CO 


W 


C 


!^M-i 


U 


a. 


•3 


CO 


B 


CU 




o 


> 


CO 


a. 


•H 


•u 


C !>. 


•H 


u 


i-H 


co 


cu 


e 


a 


CU 


CO 


cO X> 


4J 


CU 


CO 


J-i 


J 


CO 


CO 


o 


w 


J-i 


CO 


> 


CU 


CU 




J-l 




cu 




H 


w 


o 


pi p-< 




H 




Pi 





> 

3 



m 
i^ 



o 

fn CO 

O 
<U 
C 

CO 



i-H O i-l O 

oo vo vo m 


vocTiincyiOcoovo 

^■invOO^CMCTiOsf 


o cy> 
o> vO 


VO 
CO 


m 




CM CO vO vO 

CO N LO CO 
00 VO VO 


r^cMcMvocTva^iOvo 
r^rH<j-vo<l-vTiOcyi 
m co i^ cri o mo r- 


CO vO 
vTi i-l 
O 00 


00 


o> 

00 

o^ 




CM <f VO 

r- vo 


CO CO UO CO rH <t 

cm i-i m 


CM vO 
r-4 


CM 

m 


vO 
CM 




m 

i-i 






iH 


00 

I-l 



























4J 


















e 










VD 


O 


















cu 








4-1 


VO 


•H 


















■u 








O 


r^. 


J-l 


















co 








•H 




4-1 








<f 


CO 








>•> 








J-l 


J-i 


CO 








1^- 


4-1 








CO 


>, 


co 


CO 


4J 


CD 


•i-l 








cy> 


Cu 










i-l 


J-i 


I-l 


CO 


4-1 


Q 








iH 


•H 




• • 




4J 


!-i 


cd 


i-H 


•H 


P-. 








CU 




CU 




CO 




C 


cu 


X 


•H 


Q 


CO 


T3 






d 


U 


o 




4-1 


CO 


cu 


-a 


CJ 


CO 




x: 


CU 






c 


co 


cu 




c 


CO 


B 


i-i 


CO 




i-l 


u x; 






CD 


cu 


Pi 




CU 


CD 


cu 


w 


CD 


CD 


O 




CO 






> 


>-i o 






e 


^ 


m 




H 


co 


J-l 


i 


J-l 






CD 


r^ 


T3 




co 


< 


•H 


i 




•H 


■U 




CU 






oi 


i-i cy> 


cu 




co 




4-1 




rH 


O 


c 


fi 


4-1 








CO i-H 


4J 




cu 


ti 


CD 


0) 


CO 


X 


O 


o 


cO 






CO 


CJ 


CO 




co 


o 


Pi 


CJ 


aw 


o 


•H 


IS 






3 


CO 


e 




co 


•H 




c 


•H 






4-1 






TJ 


I-l 


•rl +J 


•H 




< 


4J 


M-l 


CO 


CJ 


CU 


c 


CO 


J-i 




0) 


Cu 


h «H 


4-1 






CO 


O 


J-l 


•rH 


r-H 


o 


O 


CU 




T) 


U 


o 


CO 




o3 


CU 




d 


a 


O 


•H 


d 


> 


m 


T3 


3 


6 -h 


W 


CO 




!-i 


E 


CO 


3 


•H 


4J 


13 


•rl 


i^. 


CO 


CO 


O M-4 




CD 


co 


CJ 


CO 


c ^r: ,-c 


3 


w 


tf 


CTi 






U CU 


o 


X 


<u 


CU 


X 


M 




CD 


i-H 






1-1 


co 


o 


ih tj 


4-> 


CO 


X 


Pi U) 




TD 


> 


i-l 


I-l 


X! 




CU 


4-1 






H 


CO 






^ 


CD 




O 


CO 


o 




r-l 




cu >> 


CO 




H 


0) 


CD 


4-1 


U 


J-l 


PL, 


•H 


•r-l 


>, 4J 


CU 


CJ CO 


4-1 


>> 




4J 


4-1 


i-l 


•H 


O 




O 


£ 


cO 


•H 


CJ 


C .-i 


CU 


•U 


0) 


CO 


CO 


CO 


4-1 


4J 


J-l 


CU 


CO 


r-l 


H 


C 


CO M 


CO 


C 


4-1 


4-1 


4-> 


CD 


CD 


o 


•H 


Ch 


a 


J-l 




co 


tH CU 


M-l 


3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ts 


Pd 


£ < 


CO 


M 


CU 


X 


rH 


CO > 


M-l 


o 


4-1 


















> 


cO 


cO 


CO O 


o 


o 


CO 


















o 


H 


PQ 



155 



«tf 


v£> 


CM <?i O 


<t 


o> 


<f 0> VD 


• 


• 


• • • 


CO 


CO 


<+N H 


00 


r>- 


st CTi N 


<f 


CO 


CT> CM 


A 


ft 


CN A 


CN 


CM 


n <r 


00 


r-i 


CM 



CM 



vO 


r-» 


CO 


r-~ 


• 


• 


<r 


o 


00 


o 


r^ 


CTi 


#■ 


r 


CM 


LO 


m 


r^ 


<t 


vO 


ri 




i-H 


co| 



O 



w 



> 



CO 
CO 



o 



o 

CO 

CD 

c 

3 



CO 

I-) 

CO 

>■< 

I 




o 

CO 



o 
o 


CM 


o o 
o o 


<y> co 
o> c^ 


o 
o 

CM 


i-i 

00 


O CM 

O i-l 

o c^ 


r^ i-i 
o o 




m 
m 


O CM 

o 

CM 


t-i <r 

CM 






1-1 


CM 







156 



Q 
85 

PH 





o 


o 




O 


CM 




o 


o 




o 


co 




• 


• 




• 


• 




o 


o 




o 


00 




o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 




9\ 


*\ 




•N 


r> 




o 


o 




CO 


r-H 




00 


ro 










<f 












r~- 






T3 






CT\ 






QJ 






T~\ 




C 


T3 
CJ T3 






•\ 




qj 


•h aj 






i-H 






O T3 
CO C 




MH 


r-H 




o 


QJ QJ 




O 


•H 




0) 


Pi a 






Sh CO 




I-l 


i X 




CU 


Ph D 




0) 


CO QJ 




4-1 


<J i-H 




co 


QJ C 




o 


(X 






co p 




> 


" Sh 




o 


a 






bO p 




4J 


qj m 




>. 


d CO 






£° 


CO 


XI 


•H 


e 


Sh 


H 




4-1 >-. 


o 


QJ 


W QJ 


CU 


Sn 


QJ CO 


•H 


<4H 


o 


MH 


0) 


qj i-h 


■u 


co 


u c 


CO 


4h 


S n 


co 


C 


QJ CO 


e 


co 


QJ 


X 


fl^r-l 


CO 


cj 


£ > 


CO 


u 


4-> CO 


Sh 


CO 


£ o 


H 


H 


O PQ 


H 


Sh 


o 










H 


H 











CM 
co 

00 
O 
O 

<T 

r-l 



Pi m 
W r^ 

W t-i 

Pi 

o 

Pn ro 
O 

QJ 

co 3 

M >-) 
CO 



o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O O 

o o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O00<r 
O 00 00 


CM 00 

i-Ki- 


CM 
CO 


o o o 
o o o 

CM O O 


o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 
o 


o o 

O vO 
O CO 


o 
o 

o 


o 
o 

I-l 


o o 
o o 
cr> o 


o 
o 
o 


o o o 
o o o 
r^ Ch o 


o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 


r-~ r^ co 

CTi <t 00 
00 <f- CM 


00 i-H 

cm cr> 

CM 


00 
O 
O 


rH i-l IT) 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


i-H 


CO CO 


<t 


i-H i-H 


rH 


CM 
i-H 


i-H 


rH i-H 


CM 


r-H 

















co 
































CO 








CO 








QJ 
































QJ 








4-1 








O 
































co 








Sh 








•H 






















CO 










C co 








3 








E 






















QJ 










QJ QJ co 




CO 




o 


4-1 


CO 








CO 




CO 












CO 










Ph CO CJ 




a 




c_> 


a 


fi 




QJ 






CJ 




CJ 


co 










a 










X C! i-H 




o 






CJ 


o 




CO 






O 




O 


QJ 










CU 










W QJ Ph 
Ph Sh 




•H 




CO 


O 


•H 










•H 




•H 


co 










co fu 
QJ X 




CO 


co 






4-J 




•H 


O 


4J 




CO i-H 






4J 




4-J 


c: 












QJ 


CU 




Sh X CJ 


UH 


CO 




CJ 


o 


CO 




QJ CO 






CO 




CO 


QJ 






Sh 




co W 




O 


o 




QJ W CO 


O 


U 


CO 


c 


< 


Sh 




co C 






Sh 


CO 


Sh 


& 


CO 




O 


co 


CJ 


CO 


•H 


•H 


CO 


XJ 




4J 


QJ 


QJ 




4-1 




c o 






4J 


QJ 


4J 


60 




4J 


QJ 


CU Sh 


QJ 


E 


E 


QJ 


•U Sh ^ 


>■> 


co 


O 


H 


c 


CO 




a) co 






co 


CJ 


co 


W 


C 




O 


CJ 


pu QJ 


CO 


CO 


O OJ co 


4J •• 


•H 


•H 




CO 


•H 


CO 


Dl, Sh 
CJ X CU 


co 


CO 


•H 


■H 


•H 


CO 


■H 


co 


QJ 


■H 


X £ 


C 


QJ 


cu 


CJ 


1 XJ r-H 


•H 0) 


00 


E 


i 


i-H 


60 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


WJ 


> 


W) 


QJ Sh 


T3 


QJ 


a 


E 


W 4J 


QJ 


CO 


M co 


QJ 


co 4J Sh 


U QJ 


QJ 




P-< 


QJ 


co 


OWPm 


a 


co 


QJ 


Sh 


QJ 


co QJ 


i-H 


co 


CO 


O 


& 




CJ 


^ 


bO O QJ 


O 4-1 


Pi 


QJ 


<J- 




Pi 


a 


•H 1 


•H 


a 


Pi 


QJ 


Pi 


CJ X! 


•H 


SH 


C 


QJ 


Sh i 


i-H 


•H i-H 


13 i > 


Si +J 




CO 


r-» 


c 




QJ 


4-> Sh CJ 


> 


0) 




CO 




QJ 4-> 


D 


QJ 


M 


CO 


QJ r-H 


W 


CO 


4-1 CO 


W 


r-H Sh o 


4-i -H 


t8 




cr> 


O 


c3 


^ 


Oh QJ O 


Sh 


B* 


oa 




^ 


puO 


PQ 


& 






,C QJ 




C 


4-1 C 




PQ QJ 


3 u 




i-H 


i-H 


•H 




6 X -h 


QJ 




i-H 




X i 




r-H 


r-H 


4-1 CO 


Sh 


o 


bO O 


Sh 


bOo 


co e 


CO 


CO 




4-1 


CO 


W 


QJ 4-> 4-1 


CO 


w 


CO 


CO 


CO 


W CJ 


rH 


W 


CO 


CO 


o c 


QJ 


CO 


•H co 


QJ 


rH CO 4J 


o 


C 


C 


rv 


CO 


C 




T3 O CO 






CJ 


c 


CJ 


QJ 


CO 




CJ 


c 


" CJ 


X 


Sh 


.J Sh 


XJ 


CO CJ 


>->C_) 


O 


O 


CM 


CO 


O 


Sh 


QJ 1 ;> 
Pi QJ 5H 


r-H 


Sh 


o 


O 


o 


QJ B 


a 


Sh 


•H 


o 


!>> O 


4-1 


QJ 


CU 


4-) 


Ph CO QJ 


x> 


•H 


CO 


CO 


C 


■H 


QJ 


CO 


a; 


•H 


CO 


•H 


•H 


QJ 


Sh 


co 


Sh U 


o 


Ch 


4-1 Ph 


o 


•H S cj 


cu 


4-> 


U 




QJ 


4J 


xJ 


O CU 


Sh 


x; 


4J 


Sh 


4J 


£1 CJ 


a 


X 


4J 


Sh 


CO 


1 


1 


0) 1 




CJ pj 


CO CJ 


O 


QJ 


• 


CX 


CJ 


4-» 


T3 -H co 


4-> 


4-1 


CJ 


QJ 


O 


4-J QJ 


•H 


4-1 


CJ 


QJ 


Sh CJ 


0) 


QJ 


QJ QJ 


QJ 


■rJ C & 


u c 


QJ 


Ph 


4-> 


6 


QJ 


o 


Ci r-l 


C 


o 


QJ 


PM 


QJ 


O r-H 


c 


o 


0) 


Ph 


X3 3 


Sh 


Sh 


Sh Sh 


Sh 


C ^rH 


QJ CO 


i-H 




U 


o 


i-H 




O O O 


QJ 




r-H 




i-H 


QJ 


3 




rH 




•H O 


•H 


•H 


4-J -H 


•H 


CJ O co 


Trans f 
Fin 


w 




< 


u 


w 




PQ Ph U 


CJ 




W 




W 


CO 


s 




w 




hJ H 


tn 


h 


CO Ph 


fc 


S HcS 

















































157 





m 






t> 






CD 






rH 






O 




PS 


CO 


CQ 


w 




H 


> 
o 

Q 


fa 


O 


55 


•"3 


O 


< 


1 




fa 


H 




O 


fa 


HH 




fa 


s 


55 


CQ 


w 


£e 




55 


o 




fa 


E-" 


w 
cj 

55 
>< 

HH 

CQ 


O 













m 




CM 




00 








CO 


















O 












00 




CO 




l> 








I> 


















CO 












CD 




CD 




m 








O 


















m 












TT 




in 




CD 








Tt< 


















l> 












O 




co 




00 








"* 


















CD 












m 




M 




CM 


























O 












t> 


































CD 
rH 


CQ 














































fa 


rH CD 


i-H O 


rH 




CO 












CO 




o 




H 


O 


Cj 


m 


t> CT5 Tf 


a 


o t> o 


> 


co m 


CO o 


CO 




CO 












t^ 




o 




00 


l-H 


C2 


00 


CD 


CO CO 


rH rH (X ■ 


PS 


• • 


• • 


• 




• 












• 




• 




















w 


CD 00 


in cd 


in 




CM 












CO 




•* 




rM 


i-H 


rH 




CO 


m m 


rH 


O CO o 


CO 


rH O 


00 t> "* 




rH 












r-< 




CM 




Oi 


c- 






m 


m 


00 Oi i-H O 


fa 


-* CD 


t> m 


01 




t> 












r-l 




CO 




CO 


co 






CM 


CO 


oo 


rH tJH m 


PS 


CO 


Cft rH 






r-i 




















t- 


rH 






00 




CM 


m •<* 


o 


fi <*3- 


■^ CM 
























. . 




rH 






CM 








55 





CO 
























■a 










H 








< 


•H 
P 



X Cfl 























(fi 


•H 












«aj 






CO 


O 


Si (DO 


















u 




-o 




















w 


53 


Eh X i-H 




i 














rt 


(fi 


c 


r-t 












• 




Q 


1— 1 


TS 


rt 


0) 


0) 














=H -O 


3 















T3 W 






H 


(fi 


faJDH -H 





o 














rH 


c 


fa 


O 












C 




p 


HH 


Q TJ 


fi x: 


fi 


e 




• • 






(fi 








3 




x: 












53 • 




H 


•J 


S3 


•H bC CO 


eri 


Oj 




CO 






X 


E & fa 


ri 


o 












Eh CO 




aS fi 


h- 1 


rH O 


T3 fi 


h 


M 




p 






CJ 












CO 
















Ph O 


CQ 


iH CQ 


rH -H 


3 


3 




•H 









o -a 





■s 


1 












fi • 




•H 


< 





OO 3 


CO 


CO 




(fi 






X! 


fi 


c 


rH 


o 


(fi 








o 




W 




OOP 


HH 


U (fi 


X! rH rH 


(3 


fi 











cj 


M 


o 


aS 


rH 


p 








i-H 




73 




CO CO aS 


HH 


>> faC 


x: CQ 


I— i 


hH 




a 










E O fa 


fl 








CM 




H 1 




(M CM CJ 




Bi CO 


P X! 1 








0) 






TJ 


(fi 


>> 






a 




I-H 




1 


-* 


03 


CQ 


1 1 53 




a -H fi 


•h x: tfi 


<n 





r-i 


p 









73 


as 


>, 


>, 


u 




H 




CO l> CQ rH 


r— 1 


t-i r-l T3 




> 3 £e +-> 02 


P 


P 


aS 




>, 




s 


fi PS 


Sh 


rl 


o 


1— 1 


i— i 


> oc 


00 


hH 


>■ a ; 




- a fa 


•H O 


•H 


•H 


fl 


>> d 


(fi 


•H 


53 






















(fi 








tfi CO 


rH g= Sh rH hh 





p 


£ 


be 


a 


fa 


• 


p 


P 


i-H 











• 


• 








• • r-< 




T3 


ci o 






•H 


fi 


X! 


c 


i-H 




J 








oS 


rH 


rH 


rH 


hJ -: 


X! rH 


rH 


>-l i-H OS 




. 


h 0> 


a 


CX+J 


OS 


be 


•H 


CJ 


P 




E 


E 


u 


+-> 


P 


P 






bep 


P 


•H 




>>CQ P 


p 


=s 


3 


a 


U 


•H 


r-i 


c 


tfi 


• 











■H 


•H 


•H 


• 


• 


3 -H 


■H 


• • CJ 




O tCO (S 3 





o 


a a 


•H 


50 


fi gs O CJ 


"OEhEhH&hC1h|I!EhEhPhC1h 




r-l • C 


P i-H 


u 


?H 




53 




rt 




fn 

























ft 




a 53 PhCOOJOO 

S3 




o 




Eh 




H 








fe 
















CO 




fa 













































CO 

en 
t> 
i> 

CD 
CM 
O 

co 



o 


o 


CM 


co 


t> 


00 


CM 


o 


l> 


m 


•N 


•\ 


<# 


o 


rH 


m 


CO 





CO 


CD 


H 


CO 


M 


• 


CO 


"tf 


CO 


CD 


< 


CO 




CO 




m 




m 



m- 



oo o 
m o 



CD o 
co o 
oo o 



CD CM 



CO CO 

O <tf 



CO CM 

cd m 

CO i-H 



o 



p 

c 
a 

r-i 

53 Ph 

fi 

P 

> fi 

73 

PS bCrH E rH 

fi d P P a 

l-H i-H -H Sh (fi aS ^ 

aS d U 

^i *h aS G > U C 

x: a i-< 

C XS CO O l-H O 

• •0 ^ 

X! O fa 

(fi p 

a a 

o ^ 



o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
m 

CD 



(fi 

P 

C 



E 

p 

T3 (fi 



P > 

(fi C 

l— I 

> 

fi 

hH 3 

c 

> 



PS 



o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

CO 



(fi 
p 
fi 



53 E 

fi P 

(fi 



> 


PS 

I 

c 
o 

55 



CO 
CM 

m 

CD 
CM 



O CO 
00 CM 



X) 
aS 
> 

•H 





PS 

(fi (0 



.. .. 

CM P CO 

t> a! t> 

CD P CD 

rH (fi rH 

H 



CD CD 
CD t> 
t-i CO 



>> 

p 

H 


a 
o 

Jh 

Pi P 

oS 

rH P 
(fi 

H 



O rH 

OS 

>> 

> PS 



HH 



O Tf 

rH O 



rH OS 
fi 

HH O 

O (fi 

H 
>> 

> Ph PS 


HH 



O H 

O 

CJ 



CM CM 

i> m 

rH "H 

m 

CM 



>> 
p 

*H 



Ph 

o 

in 

Ph P 

OS 

l-H P 

(fi 

fa 



o o 

CD O 



O 
CD 



<* CO 
thh t> 
CM CO 

o m 

rH <tf 
CM 

>. 
P 
U 


a 
o 

•• Sh 
m a P P 

t> OS -H 

CD rH P hh 
rH OS (0 

fi fa fi 
SH O -H 

O (fi rH 

rl OS (fi 
>, 

> a ps X! 




CO 
CO 
CO 

in 



c 
o 

■H 

P 
OS 

be 



oS 



CM 00 
CO CD 



(fi 
fi 
O 
•H 
(0 
(fi 

(fi 
(fi 

o 

a 



o i> 

m m 

o -* 

CD rH 

CM CM 



fi 



CO 

fi 
o 

•H 

(fi 
(fi (0 

«j 

rH CO. 

(0 P (fi 

-H O 

rH h a 

p 

■H X X 

Eh 03 OS 
H Eh 

03 

Eh 



158 









to 


iH 


o 


o o o o 


O 


o 


o 


in 








1-1 


O 


CM 








CO 


O 


CD 


Oi 


O 


O 


o 


O 


«tf 


o 


<x> 








t> 


O 


CM 








CO 


00 


00 


t> Oi 


in 


o 


© 


00 


CD 


CO 








CN 


m 


CM 








o 


O 


CO 


mioco 


o 


o 


00 


CM 


00 








CO 


t> 


C5 








oo 


m 


r-i 


CD CM m 


o 


m 


CD 


Oi 


Oi 








CM 


o 


rH 




K> 




•s 


«-. 


•s 




•* 


•v 


rv 


♦v 


*-. 


~ 


•* 








" 


•N 


•> 




H 




rf 


00 


co 


O CO CD 


o 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CM 








O 


rH 


*tf 




> 




<tf 


"* 


00 


00 


rH CM 


CM 


CD 


CM 


CO 










CO 








tf 






1-1 


CD 


■* 


CO 




H 


in 






















W 








•N 










- 






















w 








r-i 


CD 








>* 








• • 














H 










iH 
















c m o co 








P3 




CO 00 CN 






















o «? 


H 


iH 












m t> co 






















•rl 


• 


• 


• 












• • • 






















p 


ih co m 








P 




CN O O 






















a 


t> O 00 








^ 




t»- H CM 










CO 












•H CD ■* rH 








<! 




[> 00 CM 






iH 




O 




73 








!h 


•> 




•. 


CO 










.. n n 






o 




05 




CD 








ftt> 




CM 


73 










TT CO CD 






rl 




rH 




3 








O 






CM 


(3 






co 




CO 






p 








CO 




73 




u 








3 






w 










£3 




CO 




CO 




$3 


CD 


ft 








Ph 






M 




r-i 






o 




(3 




•rl 


73 


P 


3 


ft 














H 




•rl 






o 




o 




S3 


a 


Ph 


rH 


< 








CD 






HH 




€ d 




CO 




CD 


•H 




S3 


3 




d 










rl 






_1 




d P 


CO 


CD 


c 


t> 


CO 






Ph 


CO 


> 


u 








a 






M 




U 


>> 


CJ 





Oi 


S 




73 




p 




o 








o 






CQ 




bD O 


d 


(3 


•H 


H 


CD 




CI 


CD 





£ 


«H 














< 




O CO 


£ 


d 


p 




ft 




a 


P 


J 


O 








CQ 


r-i 






M 




h o >. 


x: 


1-1 


ri 


s 




CD 




a 




iJ 


73 






CD 


d 






J 


• • 


ft -rl P 


bD 


d 


•rl 





>>t> 


73 


p 


>> 




CD 


CO 


>> 


•H 


3 








(0 


■P 3 


•H 


CQ 


h 


p 


Jh O 


CD 


CO 


u 


<H 


> 


u 


Ph 


U 


p 








73 


X! 73 


a 




ft 


CO 


O rH 


N 


w 


CD 





u 








a 


CD 




a 




S3 


O iH 1 




S3 





>>p 




•H 




P 




CD 


P 


S3 


u 


ft 




w 




3 


S3 X! «H 


o 


O 


u 


CO 


3 73 


u 


iH 


CD 


73 


CQ 


CD 


•H 


X5 


5h 


CQ 


& 




fa 


3-P=H 


p 


■rl 


ft 




X5 


S3 





a 


E 


a 


CD S XJ 


•rl 


CD 


CD 


fc 






j<o 




P 


ft 


p 


•H 


3 


X! 


CD 


CD 


d 


P5 




CJ J 


ft 


X 


1-1 




bD 




73 


d 


<2 


CI 


fn Eh 


p 


PS 


O 


•J 




faC CJ 






d 


E-i 




CHrl (1) 


•rl 


■rl 




CD 


P 




3 








CQ 


S3 S 


O 


>> 


Eh 


55 




•H 


o OO 


<tj 


ri 





s 


c 


CD 


< 


tH 


«H 


«H 


P 


•H 




P 


U 




O 




> 


O -rl 




ft 


3 CD 


CD 


o 


> 




o 


O 


o 


ft^l 73 




CD 


>> 


O 




iH 


X! X! iH 


0) 


O 


S3 l> 


^ CJ 


U 


CO 








•H 


u 


d 73 


P 


P> 






o 


O O 


p 


Jh 


CD C5 


•H 


1 


CD 


d 





CD 


CD 


CD 


d 


o 


•H 


CD 


S3 






> 


CO CO ft 


d 


ft 


> iH 


P 


a 


CO 


ri 


1-1 


r-i 


rH 


O 


ft PC, a-J 


E 


3 


1 









p 


ft 


CD 


CD 





CD 


o 


a 


ri 


d 


CD 








CD 


O 






PS 




CO 


< 


PS 


PS ^ C4 


-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Cti 








O 


CJ 



CO 



O 
O 
O 

< 








CO 
















t> 




m 




t* 
















CO 




o 




m 
















CM 




CO 




CD 
















oo 




w 




iH 
















o 




Oi 




t> 




















CD 




m 




















rH 




CM 
























cd m t> -« t> 






O O 00 






oo oo 




CM rH 




ooo^ooo 


CO 


CQ 'JT Ol tH i-l 






Oi CM O 






o o 




CD Tt< 




in CD rH O O O 


Eh 


•rl * • • • 






• • • 






• • 




• • 






H 


O CM CM CO Tt* 






O CD r-i 






"* "* 




t> 00 




o t> oo t> Tf m 


CO 


X CD CM CO ■* 






CM 00 CD 






CM CM 




r-i Tji 




o i> C5 1> m cm 


CO 


H CD C75 Tj< iH 






rH rH 






rH r-i 




CN rH 




CM Th O CD CM rH 


<3 


^1 CO Tf r-i r# 
<D t> O 
rH iH 
•rl 














P 






Ci Tji r-i r-i 

r-i 

CQ d 

P S3 CO P 




a 


CO 


• • 






• • 




CQ 






(3 O P CD S3 




u 


P 


co cm co m 




co co m 


CD 






CD -H S3 O CD 




Eh 


S3 


CD 


t> t> t> 




CD 


t> t> 


U 






P g P CD -H Pi 






CD 


X 05 Ci Ol 




X O 05 


CD 


co m 




S3 P d S > 




o3 


a 


d 


rH r-i r-i 




d 


i-i r-i 


P I> t> 




CD U rH P Sh >> 




cm co tj< m 


CO 


H 






p 




S3 o a 




S d H ^ CD P 




CD t> t> t> t> 


CO 




«H «H «H 






«H «H 


t-H 


rH r-i 


• • 


P ft d d CO in 




i— i ci o en ctj 


CD 


o 


O O 




o 


O 






r-i 


U P ft 




O H rH rH iH 


CQ 


p 






p 




73 


<H «H 


d 


d Q CQ - ft 




•rl 


CO 




>»>»>> 






>, >> CD 


o o 


p 


ft S3 Q CQ O 




X! «H «H «H «H 


< 


73 


> > > 




73 


> > 


P 




S3 


>,r-i (3 U 




IDOOOO 




.. CD 


CD CD CD 


• • 


CD 


CD CD 


P 


>> >% 


CD Q d r-i d ft 




> 


r-i 


M'OJJJ 


f-i 73 HH HH 


•H 


> > 


S 


^ ^1 O $H 




>>>>>>>, 


a 


CD 73 




CD 73 




S 


CD CD 


P 


X! O S3 




^ > > > > 


•rl 


£«: 




P 


< 




6hlJ 


rl 


^ be £ X! P £ 




O CD CD CD CD 


O 


CD 




d 






o 




d 


•H -H QJ O 




P HH J J HH 


CD CO 




& 






CJ 




ftfn S3 CO CO > H 







ft 
















CD 






S 


CO 
















Q 





159 



o 


o 

o 


CO 


O 

O 


CD 


CO 


O 

CD 


CO 

CO 


CD 
O 


in 

CD 


CD 



m 







00 
m 


O 

O 


t> 




CD 
CM 


o 
o 


CD 
CD 


00 

CM 

rH 


in 

CD 
rH 


CD 


CM 


m 

CD 
CM 


CO 

in 

CO 


in 

<* 
m 


CD 
CD 

CD 


H 
O 

m 


00 

CO 
CO 


O 
O 
O 








CO 
lO 




CM 


<tf 


rH 


m 
00 


CD 





CD 

m 


00 
m 




CD 


in 























CO t> CD 






in rH 
































CM rH CO 






CD 00 














GO 


















co m 






O ■<* 














H 


















+-> rf m 






m <d 














> 


















g cd m 00 






m cd 














OS 


















CD - - ~ 






- ., 














w 
















CO 


6 CM O rH 






CO CO 














go 
















c 


CD <tf ^ 






CO 














w 



















4-> 




















PS 









4-1 






CO 


•H 










CO 




, . 








Q 








d 






G 


d 


< 








h 


to 


M 








52; 






-p 


4-> 






O 


> 






• ■ 


+-> 


CD 


£S 


C 








<c 








•H 


w 






CQ 


5-i 
CD 


H 






-P 


G 

G 


•H 


•H 


•H 
M 








CO 






H 


1 






G 


CO 


=H 




d 


O CD 


d 


d 


d 









w 






4-> 








O 


CD 






rH 


O E 


4-> 


x: 


x: 


S 






rH 






03 


CO 


r-t 






OS 


TJ 




P< 


O O 


G 


CO 


CO 









H 






•H 


CD 


O 


CO 


4-> 




CD 






< O 


O 













rH 






Q 


O 


H 


d 


CO 


T3 


> 


CO 


4-> 


c 











c 






J 








H 


4-> 


d 


CD 


C 


h cm co m 


G 


g 


CI rH 




3 


3 


1— 1 






1— 1 






H 


3 


G 


O 


r< 


d 


l> t^ l> 


rH 


CD 


O 





c 


fl 








03 


CO 


(0 








O 


iJ 







co cd cd cd 


A 


E 


•rH 4-> 


4-> 








4-> 




Q 


<d 





fafl 


> 


w 


O 




+J 


CO 


CD rH rH rH 


u 


+-> 


4J fl 


CO 


> 


> 


c 


CD 


W 


M 


CO 





•H 


CD 




c 


c 


.W 


OS 


G 


d 


O CD 


d 











CD 


£> 


J 


c 


Q 


OS 


PS 


C 





h-i 


H 


'H'H =H 


co 


CD 


3 £ 


^ 


OS 


OS 


E 


t> 


!5 




0) 















d 


CO 




H 


H 4-> 








4-> 




1— 1 







<H 


x: 


rH 


•H 


a 


T} 


P. 


>, 


>> 


H 


4-1 CO 


<H 


rH 


rH 


CO 


H 


£h 




•H 








d 


+-> 


3 


CD 




d t>i ^*> p^ 


d 




CO CD 





d 


d 








125 




rH 




•H 


H 


3 


•H 


3 


CD 


rH > > > 


rH 


H 


G > 




U 


5-< 


> 


4J 












pf 


3 


rH 


E 


H 


4-> 


SW CD CD CD 


U 


CD 


O CS 











c 


a 







fcuo 


rH 


CO 


4-> 


rH 


CD 


O 


d 


<D J J J 


CD 


4-> O rH 


rH 


X5 


T3 


1— ( 


d 









d 


a 


d 


O 


H 


O 


4-> 


> 


> 


d 




d 










X! 






Q 


w 


1— 1 


Iz; 


(h 


Ph 


<: 


GO 


O 


O 


!=£ 




02 


rH 


fe 




O 



CO 



O 

o 














m 






CD 










































CO 






00 










































m 






•* 










































in 






CD 










































CM 






l> 










































00 






CD 










































CO 






rH 










































rH 












































co m 




l> rH C5 




<N ■* 







O 


O 


O 






O 


















O O 






m cn 




O rH Tj< 




t> 


rH 







O 


O 


O 






O 


















O O 






r> ^ 




CO C7) O 




t> 


t> 







O 


O 


O 






O 


















O O 






-tf if j 




CO CO CO 




CD 


CM 







O 


O 


O 






O 






O 











O O 






CO r-i 




■<tf -^ 00 




rH CD 







O 


in 


O 






O 






O 











O O 


CO 




CTi t> 








rH 


in 







CM 


CM 


-* 






O 


















r-i O 


H 




(N 








rH 






<M 












m 






O 




<N 






CM 


W 




r-i 












































CO 


CO 






























•> 
















•, 


CO 




























+-> 


r-i 




P 


r-i 








>i 


CM 


<d 






CO 



X 

d 












I> 

CD CD 


H 

4-> 

c 



>.CO 




-a 
d 


OS 

CO 4-> 
CD «H 



t> 


a 

d 

rH 
& 

c 








d 

rH 
4-> 

d 





CO 
l> 




CO 


4-> 
H 


XI 
O 

P 


Schools 
73 

Andover 








cm co m 


• • 






TJ CD ^! CD 


4-> CD 


fi CD CD 


E 




CD 


s 




CD 




CD 




CD 4-> 








4-> 


O t> t> 


cn 









rH rH 


rH 


rH U 


l-H 


+-> 




r-i 


+-> 




r-i 




rH 


CO 


AH CQ 










CJ1 CD CJ5 


>> 






N 





SH 


•H 







d 






d 






■M 




G 











xj 


rH rH rH 


d 






•H 


- H - 


d - 


P 


- c 


•- 







•. 







r, 


O 


•> 


O 


•>£: 













^ 






h CO CQ <| 


CO 


d 


CD d CD 


H 




CD 


U 




CM 


3 m 


•H 


X! t> 








X! 


iHtHH 


x: 






O ■* 


rH 


> 


rH PQ CM H 




co E- : 




r-i 


H 


H 


4-> 


CO rH 1 






CO T3 


OOO 


bfl 






X! 


CO 


O 


rH 


1 
















Eh 




d 


£ 






<3 




•H 






4-> 


U 


■H 





M 





H 







H 












> 


a a) u 











>>>>>, 


K 




>> 


3H COH 


rH rH 


CO rH 


rH 







r-* 







rH 





rH 


O 


XJrH 






CO -H 


(0 


> > > 







4-> 


< 


O MOXI U 


C 


O £ 





4-> 




O 


+J 







H 


O 


G 


CO CJ £ 




. . 


> 


S3 





O 


4-> 


c 




•H O -H 


(X 4-> 





•H 


•H 


d 




•H 


d 




•H 


•H 


■H 





•H 




H 


4-> 5h 


J hH HH 


4-> 


d 


3 


CO 4J DS 4-> 


O 4-> GO V ss 




4-> 


& 




4-> Ph 


4-1 


OS 


o3 4-> CO 







d 


•H 






+J 





fi 


^1 ?H 


H 




H 


Sh 






H 






H 




f-l 




?H 




4-1 


OS CO 


rJ 




T3 K' C. 


d «a3 <: 


< 




<: 


< 






< 






<n 




< 




< 




d 








•H 









































3£ 








< 






J 

































160 



Q 

W 

i— i 

o 
o 



CO 



o 
o 
o 






K2 

> 
05 
W 
CO 

w 

05 



Q 
< 

CO 



CQ 



O 

to 

oo 
o 
m 

o 
m 



o 
u 



-p 

G 

3 


> 
H 
CO 

co 0) 

rH 

05 p 



CO 


"tf 


o 


CO 


•* 


oo 


00 


1— 1 


o> 


^ 


o 


m 


a> 


t> 


CO 


i-H 


i> 


rH 


r-i 


to 


tO 


to 




o 


t> 


r« 


•\ 




•* 


• 


o 


■* 




'tf 


Oi 


00 






o 


CO 


■* 






IM 


o 

CNI 



co t> m m to 

t> cm o co oo 

m co co m ■<* 

to to (M m <y> 

r-i <J> Oi (N t> 



t> 
m 



T3 
G 

a to 

■H 
Q) o 

r-i X 

o w 

•H 
•G ^ 



> rH 

■H 

H OS 

o 



o 
o 

o 
o 
m 

to 
to 
m 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 



to 00 

rH CO 



CO 



CO 
+-> 
e 
cu 
s 
co 
co 

CU rH 

en as 

CO -P 

<: g 
o 

a p 



co 
a 
G 

hfi 






•H 

o 

0) Q,P 
a CU «J 
CO Q 



i== < 



CO 
0) 
•H 

Jh 


> 
O 
O 

03 



•H 
« 
rH 
O 



o 
a 
a 
u 

3 
CO 

G 



m 
as 

i> 

to 



oo -tf co 

t> rH O 

t> -tf to 

rH 00 ^ 
CM CO 



CM 
t> 





p 



o 
o 



o 

C7> 



oo 
<* 

t> 

to 
m 





3 
a 

> 


03 

CO 

3 

rH 
ft 
H 
3 

CO 



to 
to 
t> 

O 

CO 

o 
t> 

CM 



o 



CO 

w 

CO 
CO 



G 

•H 

a} 

m 

C- H 

<X> 

rH P 

as 
-is 

rH • 

P 
(1) CO 

rH 
O S 

•H rH 

P W 
H 

< 



a 
=s 

a 

H 

H 

> 
O 

T3 

G 

cti 

CO 

P 

a 

B 

•H 

P 
CO 


u 
< 

T3 

a 





e 
o 
o 

G 

IH 



CO o 
T3 CO 
G -H 

a > 
<3 



H rH 

rt sS 

U M 

>J 

^i 


P o 

-H 
S rH 
O 
U ft 



CO 


a 
a 

be 

G 



to 

t> 

en 




3 
G 

> 

03 



161 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded and 

Fixed Debt 12,905,000.00 Article 10, 1955-High School 5,000.00 

Article 1, 1975-South School 80,000.00 
Article 24, 1961-Sanborn SchoolllO, 000.00 
Article 14, 1960-Sewer Trunk 

Line 15,000.00 

Article 1, 1963-Sewer APW-46G 360,000.00 
Article 8, 1964-High School 1,950,000.00 
Article 6, 1965-Fish Brook 400,000.00 
Article 11, 1965-Municipal 

Buildings 555,000.00 

Article 1, 1967-Bancrof t 

School 1,135,000.00 

Article 1, 1966 and Article 

3, 1967-High School 550,000.00 

Article 13, 1967-Water 

System Projects 420,000.00 

Article 16, 1967-Municipal 

Buildings 360,000.00 

Article 8B, 1968-and Article 

17, 1968-West and Bancroft 

Schools 1,560,000.00 

Article 10, 1967-Land 

Acquisition 150,000.00 

Article 15, 1968-East Junior 

High Remodeling 120,000.00 

Article 4C 1967-Street 

Construction 90,000.00 

Article 4A, 1967 and Article 

32, 1968-Water Projects 120,000.00 
Article 4B, 1967 and Article 

16, 1968-Sewer Projects 355,000.00 
Article 19A and 3B, 1969- 

Sewer Project Lowell & 

Summer Streets 120,000.00 

Article 5, 1968 and Article 

2B, 1969-Water Project 

Lowell Street 95,000.00 

Article 14, 1969-Municipal 

Buildings 60,000.00 

Article 26, 1970-Water 

Treatment Plant 2,350,000.00 

Article 15, 1970-School Sites 140,000.00 
Article 15, 1973-Shawsheen & 

Doherty School Renovations 885,000.00 
Article 1A, 1974 Fiscal 

Cycle Loan 330,000.00 

Article 26, 1970 Water 

Treatment Plant 100,000.00 

Article 17, 1973 Sewer 

West Andover 180,000.00 

Article 48, 1974 Land 

Acquisition 310,000.00 

12,905,000.00 12,905,000.00 



162 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 178,541.55 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Revenue Due in 1975 178,541.55 



Apportioned Water Assessments 

38,385.54 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 



Suspended Water Assessments 



9,653. 03 



2,341.66 



Apportioned Water Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1975 
to 1995 Inclusive 38,385.54 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Revenue 9,653.03 

Suspended Water Assessments 

Revenue 2,341.66 



228,921.78 



228,921.78 



163 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
December 31, 1974 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1974 
Merrimack Valley National Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Provident Institution for Savings 

Receipts : 

Payroll Deductions 

Make-up Payments 

Transfers from Other Systems 

Pension Reimbursements from other Systems 

Transfers from Savings 

Appropriations : 

Town 248,868.00 

Housing Authority 2,230.00 

Investment Income 

Miscellaneous Refund 



14,179.92 
10,101.00 
43,000.00 



170,971.85 
2,125.66 
5,599.72 
4,262.60 



251,098.00 

101,188.52 

177.30 



67,280.92 



535,423.65 
602,704.57 



Disbursements : 

Administrative Expense 
Salaries 

Other Expenses 3,211.24 

Refunds of Accumulated Deductions 19,179.27 

Annuities Paid 33,885.88 

Pensions Paid 294,204.29 

Interest on Refunds 320.17 

Purchase of Securities 170,514.64 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 1,047.93 

Pension Reimbursements to Other Systems 3, 130.54 



525,493.96 



Cash Balance, December 31, 1974 
Merrimack Valley National Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Provident Institution for Savings 



14,109.61 
50,101.00 
13,000.00 



77,210.61 



164 



m 


ci 


i-l 


co 


00 


m 


X 


o 


i> 


CO 


CI 


(M 


l> 


CO 


CO 


o 


■* 


CO 


o 


CD 


m 


rH 


00 


I-l 


00 



co 


CO 


rH 


oi 


o 


o 


co 


co 


(M 



CO 



01 



CI 
CM 

l> 

m 



oo 

01 



s 




w 




H 




CO 




!* 




co 




H 




S5 




W 




s 




w 


<tf 


« 


I> 


M 


+-> c> 


H 


rH 


W 





« 


XI - 




CO rH 




CO 


>H 


(1) 


pej 


o Sh 


O 


C 


H 


03 X! 


P 


^ g 


CO 


(S 0) 


i—i 


cq a 


« 





H 


Q 


^ 




O 




o 





« 



o 

Q 



T3 


XJ 










C 


H 










3 


3 











(H 


fcH 




u 


o 

•H 




00 







o 


> 




&0 


> 




«H 


?H 




c 


Sh 






CD 




■H 





T3 


-a 


co 


x> 


> 


03 


C 


c 




c 


Ki 


CD 


3 


3 


>> 


3 


CO 


C4 


fe 


fe 


5h 


Pn 


>> 


>> 


a 


rH 


+-> 





+-> 


-(-> 


o 


as 


•H 


CO 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•iH 


rH 


a 


3 


3 


CO 


O 


•H 





C 


a 


a 





S 


a 


c 


a 


iP 


a 




X 


< 


< 


o< 


CO 




H 



rH 


r-i 


^ 


Ol 


CO 


m 


m 


o 


rH 


Ol 


CO 


r-i 


O 


o 


o 


i> 


t> 


o 


01 


CM 


Ol 


rH 


t^ 


CM 


Ol 


Ol 


co 


r-i 


o 


l> 


o 


<-{ 


m 


CO 


00 


r-* 


oo 


O 


m 


m 


rH 


CO 


CO 


m 


Ol 


t> 


CO 


r-i 


Ol 


<# 


<tf 


CD 


CO 


m 


Ol 


CO 


CM 


CO 


co 


rH 


r-i 


rH 


"* 


r-f 


Ol 


00 


i-i 


CO 


CO 


00 




CO 


r-i 


CO 


^ 


r-i 


r-i 






Ol 





















w 




















T3 




















c 




















O 




















CQ 












CO 




















TO 








C 












a 








O 












o 














CO 






CO 


CO 






-P 






T3 




CO 




■a 






CQ 






C 


CO 


■v 


>> 


a 
















T3 


c 


■p 


o 




CO 


r) 






co 


c 


o 


•H 


CQ 




M 











o 


CO 


rH 




CO 


c 


+-> 






+•> 


CQ 




■H 


rH 


J4 


aJ 


a 






q 







+-> 


03 


o 


CQ 


hH 




CO 





X3 


c 


D 


•H 


o 











s 


aJ 







Sh 


•p 


CO 


X3 




•rH 


S3 


O 


XI 


O 


-P 


CO 


hD 







+-> 


U 


Sh 


a 


•H 


CO 




c 


3 




■H 





t-H 





rH 


3 


^ 


•H 


Sh 




u 


> 


>H 


rH 


X! 


-a 


c 


> 


O 


X! 


3 


o 


05 





3 


c 


oi 


OS 


O 


CO 


O 


a 


W 


H 


Dh 


HH 


CO. 


CO 


< 


a 





















V 


CO 



















165 







a 






-p 






o 






H 






&<* 






•H r> 






Xi\ 






CO iH 






U CO 






d)\ 






42 CN 






S rH 






CD 






s 






CO 






+-> 






c 






CD 






s 






CD 




CO 


Jh 


m 


PS 


•H 


w 


w 


-P 


H 


CQ 


CD 


w 


§ 


tf 


|X 


w 




CO 


s 




H 


w 


CO 


SS5 


> 


u 


H 


1— 1 


CO CD 


S 


Eh 


73 <H 


H 


o 


fl T3 CO 


B3 


<n 


3 a C 


i— i 




<h c*. as 


H 




CD fn 


H 


1 


Pi H 


DS 


>H 




>H 


H 


CO 


« 


1— 1 


!m 


o 


> 


CD -0 


H 


I— I 


X CD 


13 


H 


S rH 


cq 


CJ 


iH 


M 


<! 


S O 


tf 




Sh 


H 




& G 


& 


ft 


CD 


O 


1— 1 


S 


CJ 


CO 




« 


H 


a 


H 


CQ 


•H CO 


> 


s 


XI t> 


O 


H 


CO \ 


Q 


s 


U rH 


£ 




CD CO 


<C 




X\ 

0) rH 



IH 



IH 



Ph 



fe 



CD 


00 


O 


Ol 


•* 


t> 


0) 


<* 


o 


"<* 


<M 


CM 


•HH 
rH 


CD 


m 


LO 




CO 



lO CO Ol rH CM CM 

CM CN H O H 



CM 



CO 



■* CM 



Oi 



m 



m 



oo cm m o> *# 
** cd "^ m 



CM 



CM 

00 



oo 

CM 



CD 



CJ 



CM 



CO 



CN 



H CM CO CO 



CO ■* O CD r-i CM 
<N CM CM OS H 



CM 



00 CM CO O) -hh 
■hh CD ^ m 



"tf 



m 



CD 



CM 



m 






CO 
CM 



to 








CO 

















M 








o 




CO 




u 








•H 




a 




o 








=H 




■H 




^ 






>J 


H-i 


>> 


Sm 










^ 


O 


1H 





tH 


o 












rt 


4-> 


o 


■H 


CJ 




■P 


S3 


U 





o 


H 


■H 








£s 


X! 


<H 


X! 


X 


rH 


u 


s 


O 


■H 


rt 


o 


3 


O 


•H 





Eh 


hJ 


a 


CO 


Oh 


Oh 


IH 


CJ 



166 



re 
p 
o 

H 



IM 



00 



in 



(M 



m 



CM 



CO 



co 
o 



\ 

•h on 

co cm 

Cxi d iH 



Ph 



x 



CT5 



05 



05 
CM 



CM 



<tf 



05 



CM 



CO 



in 



CM 



CM 

LO 



LO 



T3 P 



CO 



CO 



CM 



co 










a 






?-< 









■H 


rH ^ 






+-> 


Sh CO 


CO 







3 


cr; 




tf 


O >" 


w 








CO 








s 








H 








s 








Q 


05 






w 


rH 


TS 




tf 




0) 


+-> 


i— i 


.. 


CO 


G 


H 


i-H 


re 





W 


CO 





Sh Sh 


« 




o 


u re 




u 





3 




<x> 


p 


o >-< 


Pm 


XI 






O 




o 






W 


0) 






•J 


Q 






^ 




T> 




Q 







-* 


H 




^ 


=H 1> 


B 




•H 


o\ 


t_) 




P 


rH 


CO 







CO \ 






P3 


C0 rH 



f=H 



CD 



05 



CM 



CO 



05 

CM 



Tf 



CM 



CM 



CM 



CO 



05 

















p 


















•H 


















«H 
















>» 



















p 


c 














>> 


•H 

















p 


H 


CQ 










o 


Q 


■H 
H 


•H 

42 


XI 










a 


a 


■H 


re 


p 










o 


o 


,Q 


en 


re 










•H 


•H 


re 


•H 













P 


P 


co 


Q 


a 










a, 


a, 


•H 














o 


o 


Q 


rH 

re 


rH 

re 




< 


CQ 


o 


Sh 


Sh 


>> 


p 


p 










O 





Sh 


B 


G 




a 


C 





> 


> 


re 













o 


o 


•H 


•H 


G 


T3 


T) 


r-i 


•H 


•H 


•H 


> 


> 


■H 


•H 


•H 


a 


4-> 


p 


p 


Sh 


^ 


-a 








p 


a 


a 


a 


3 


3 


?H 


O 





o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


<5 


<J! 


H 



167 



CO 

55 <* 

Oh CD 



O 



to 



+J 




















g 




















(D rH 


in 


rH 


CM 


CM 


m 


m 


CD 


rH 


O 


O <H rt 


o 


CO 


X 


rH 


CM 


Tt< 


CD 


CO 


o 


Jh -P 




















o 


cd 


CD 


o 


CM 


CO 




CO 


CO 


o 


Oh H 


rH 




CM 


CM 






rH 




o 








bfi 


Sh 


a 


U 


u 


.Q 





a e 


> 





< 


s 



o 


CD 


cd 


CM 


cd 


CO 


^ 


cd 


co 


CO 


m 


m 


CM 


CO 


t> 


CM 


CO 


^ 


rh 


CM 


CM 


m 


CO 


^ 


CO 


<tf 


^ 


co 


m 


co 


CD 


CM 


co 


en 


m 


CD 


rH 


m 


CM 


o 


•* 


^ 


rH 


m 


rH 



CO 



CM 



CO 



CO 



m 



CM 



CO 



CO 

H 

55 
H 

m 

< 



55 

o 



a -h 

cs g g 

4-> G 

o < P-i 



o 



CM 

CO 



co 
o 



o 
co 



CO 



CD 






CD 



CM 



CO 
CD 



CM 



t> 
CM 



m 



o 

CO 



co 
co 



CD 


rH 


TF 


CM 


CO 


•* 


CO 


CM 


rH 


CD 


CO 


rH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


in 


t> 


rH 


Tf 


CD 


00 


o 



CD 
CM 

co 



CO 

<; 

55 

<; 



u u 

















0<H X! 


O 


CM 


rH 


EOS 


CM 


rH 


CM 


3 








55 S 









CM 



m 



m 

CM 



co 
o 















>> 




w 














-P 




cs 














•H 




•H 














fn 




Jn 


+-> 












O 







g 


w 




03 






X! 




-P 










M 






-P 







S 


o 




u 






3 




<HH 


4-> 


•H 




o 






< 




bJ 


ft 


<H 




& 










U 


«S 


<H 


>> 








faD 






a 


o 


U 


o 







G 


rH 


rH 







a 


•H 


O 




•H 


O 


o 


Q 


g 


u 


rH 


■H 





W 


O 


o 




£ 


& 


& 


rH 


u 


3 


.G 


Xi 




o 


•H 


3 


O 


•H 


O 


O 


o 




H 


•J 


Oh 


Ph 


Eh 


w 


CO 


CO 



168 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 



ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Milton Greenberg, Chairman - 1977 
George E. Heseltine, Vice-Chairman 
Edmund J. Sullivan, Jr., Secretary 
Alan F. French - 1978 
Janet D. Lake - 1977 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Francis E. Griggs, Jr., Chairman - 1977 
1976 George F. Olesen, Jr. - 1977 
1976 David R. Ahouse - 1976 

Robert B. Mclntyre - 1976 

Elaine F. Viehmann - 1978 



TOWN MODERATOR 

William J. Dalton - 1976 

T RUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 

Charles F. Dalton, Chairman - 1977 
Frederick E. Cheever - 1976* 
John M. Murray - 1978 



*Deceased 



4/24/75 



R EGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Fred S. Tarbox, Andover - 1976 

John P. Ford, Lawrence 

Patrick McCarthy, Lawrence 

Joseph F. Sweeney, Lawrence 

Charles McLean, Methuen 

John W. Regan, Methuen 

John J. Caffrey, North Andover 



2. 



Ahouse elected March, 1975 for one 
year to fill vacancy created by resig- 
nation of John G. Wragg effective 
September 19, 1974. William V. Wash- 
burn filled that vacancy by appointment 
from November, 1974 to March, 1975. 

Mclntyre appointed September, 1975 to 
fill vacancy created by resignation of 
John F. Lyons effective June 30, 1975. 



TRUSTEES, PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Arthur W. Cole - 1976 
Fred W. Doyle - 1976 
William V. Emmons - 1976 
Malcolm J. Ruhl - 1976 
Harry Sellars - 1976 
Rev. J. Everett Bodge 
Rev. Otis Maxfield 
Rev. J. Edison Pike 



A NDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Thomas P. Eldred, Chairman - 1976 
Richard A. Savrann - 1976* 
John B. White, Jr. - 1980 
Winston A. Blake - 1978 
Thomas R. Wallace - 1979 

*Appointed by Commissioner of 
Department of Community Affairs (State) 

APPOINTIVE 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr., Chairman - 1976 

Virginia H. Cole - 1978 

Dana R. Duxbury - 1978 

Leo F. Griffin - 1978 

Donn B. Byrne - 1977 

Paul C. Dow, Jr. - 1977 

Melvyn Miller - 1977 

James B. Watt - 1976 

Robert S. Zollner - 1976 

John C. Doherty, Chairman* 
*Term expired, 1975 

Peter W. Holland* 
♦Resigned, 10/75 

MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 

J. Maynard Austin 

Donald J. Mulvey, Alternate 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Albert F. Cullen, Jr., Chairman 
Robert P. Domingue 
Jane E. Griswold 

Domenic Terranova, Chairman* 
*Term expired 6/75 

Associate Members: 

Grover H. Nix 
Willard M. Walsh 
Wesley E. Whitney 

Virginia H. Hammond* 

Victor J. Mill, Jr.* 

*Resigned, 10/75 

TRANSPORTATION POLICY ADVISORY GROUP 
Sheldon S. Cohen 



169 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Archibald D. Maclaren, Chairman 
Phillips B. Marsden, Jr. 
William H. Russell 

BOARD OF RETIREMENT 

David L. Nicoll, Chairman 

Leo F. Daley 

Wendell A. Mattheson, Secretary 

TOWLE FUND TRUST 

Robert A. Watters, Chairman 
Anna M. Greeley* 
Irene H. McCarthy 

*Deceased - 11/28/75 

PLANNING BOARD 

David M. Erickson, Chairman 

William E. Bant on 

Margaret R. Keck 

Donald J. Mulvey 

Stanley Saba 

C ONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Virginia H. Hammond, Chairman 
Albert I. Alexander, III 
Stephen R. Duly, Esq. 
Robert M. Henderson 
Dr. Edward M. Lenoe 
Virginia H. Riddiford 
Dr. Richard T. Secord 

Joseph L. Monan, Chairman* 
*Term expired 6/75 

Ralph T. Preble* 

♦Resigned, Spring, 1975 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Herbert M. Oshan, Chairman 

John Dilorio 

H. Thomas Dill 

S. Joseph Hoffman 

Dorothy Sherrerd 

Dr. Lawrence Spiegel 

Dr. Thomas Swift 

George Ziady 

Thomas W. Tavenner* 
Term expired 6/75 

AMBULANCE STUDY COMMITTEE 

Dean K. Webster, Chairman 

William L. Lane 

William D. Martin 

Dr. William R. O'Reilly 

Louise B. Stupack 

Dr. Harry S. Westcott 

Christine H. Young 

Lt. Raymond Collins, Police Dept . 

Deputy Chief William Downs, Fire Dept 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 

Dr. William R. O'Reilly 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

Benjamin Brown (American Legion) 

John O'Connor (V.F.W.) 

John J. Lewis (Veterans' Service Agent) 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Thomas P. Brennan 
Harry Sellars 
Eugene A. Zalla 
Elden R. Salter 

TRUSTEES, MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Frederick S. Allis , Chairman 

Robert G. Butler 

Dr. Ernest F. Costello 

Edward I . Erickson 

Marta B. Hornidge 

Cornelia W. LeMaitre 

Richard C. MacGowan 

Dr. Fred G. Arragg* 
Resigned, 11/74 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Philip K. Allen, Co-Chairman 
Philip A. Dargie, Co-Chairman 
Stanley Butcher 
Edward M. Harris 
Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 
Margaret H. Thompson 

Arthur E. Kerwien* 

*Resigned, Spring, 1975 

Irving 0. Piper* 
♦Term expired 6/75 

RECREATION/COMMUNITY SCHOOLS COMMITTEE 

James A. Flynn, Chairman 

Thomas F. Comparato 

Willis E. Gray, Jr. 

Richard Marciano 

Douglas Mitchell* 

Robert R. Radula 

Charles C. Rancour t 

Patricia C. Saalfrank 

*Chairman through April, 1975 

Carol A. Dowd* 
Resigned, 11/74 

Barbara R. Swift* 
Resigned, 9/75 

Don P. Scott* 
Resigned, 1975 



170 



CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON OIL 
REFINERY PROPOSALS 



Dr. Pasquale A. Marino 
William W. Lewis 
Frederick E. Snell 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 



Chief David L. Nicoll 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Town Manager J. Maynard Austin 

William E. Banton 

Francis C. Emmons, Jr. 

Francis J. Trombly 

SACRED HEART PROPERTY STUDY COMMITTEE 



Austin E. Anderson, Chairman 
Robert G. Butler 
Ralph S. Crossan 
Ruth H. Dunbar 
Willis E. Gray, Jr. 
Francis E. Griggs, Jr. 
George E. Heseltine 
Elinor M. Ristuccia 
Stanley Saba, Jr. 
Frederic S. Stott 

BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

Norma A. Gammon, Chairman 
Virginia H. Cole 
William J. Dalton 
Francis A. Demers 
Joan M. Dill 
George W. Glennie 
Edward M. Harris 
William E. Hart 
Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 
Dorothy S. Hill 
Barbara G. Lampe 
John D. Lewis 
James W. McLeod 
Gary C. Ralph 
Barbara T. Saulnier 
Dorothy M. Sherrerd 
Helen M. Watkinson 
Sidney P. White 

RECYCLING ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Gail E. Anderson 

Helen F. Anderson 

Judith M. Block 

Susan B. Dennett 

Alexandra Driscoll 

Elaine Katz 

Jacqueline M. Kovacs 

Margaret A. Pustell 

Lolli A. Sumberg 

IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT 
John Avery 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade, Andover's Represent- 
ative to 1/14/77 



BIKEWAYS COMMITTEE 

Richard E. Chapell 
Margaret R . Keck 
Audrey R. Kenney 
E. Mark Klempa, Jr. 
H. Barbara Lybrand 
John M. McCoy 

HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Frank A. Demers, Chairman 

J. Radford Abbot 

Eugene A. Bernardin 

Elizabeth A. Fields 

William P. Foster 

Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 

Margaret R. Keck 

C OUNCIL ON AGING 

Don P. Scott, Chairman 

Leslie S. Bartow 

James A . Booth 

James Caldwell 

Gertrude M. Harris 

Florence McGrath 

Pamela H. Mitchell 

Edith St Jean 

Gary C. Ralph, Ex Officio 

Joseph B. Doherty, Jr.* 
Resigned, 11/75 

T OWN MEETING STUDY COMMITTEE 

Frederick P. Fitzgerald, Chairman 

James D. Doherty 

Albert Greenberg 

Norman P. Merrill 

Forrest H. Noyes , Jr. 

Irving 0. Piper 

Francis P. Reilly 

Janet L. Scheerer 

Gerald M. Silverman 

G REATER LAWRENCE SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 
Edmund J. Sullivan, Jr. 
J. Maynard Austin* 
Robert E. McQuade* 
*Ex Officio 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 
James W. McLeod, Chairman 
John D. Lewis 
William D. Martin 
Robert E . McQuade 
John H. Obert 
Gary C. Ralph 
Francis P. Reilly 

T RUSTEES - SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Gilbert J. Cromie , Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever* 
Irving J. Whitcomb 

♦Deceased - 4/24/75 
Leo F. Daley* 

*Term expired -6/75 



171 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 

Edward W. Brooke, 535 Beacon Street, Boston 
Edward M. Kennedy, 1702 P.O. Blsg., Boston 



FIRST ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 1, 2, 3, 4 
William X. Wall, 179 Spruce Street, Lawrence 

SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 5, 6 
William L. Saltonstall, 388 Summer Street, Manchester 

TWENTY-SEVENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Gerald M. Cohen, 5 William Street, Andover 



172 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1975 



Animal Inspector ....... 

Assessor 

Civil Defense Director .... 

Collector-Treasurer. ..... 

Director, Memorial Hall Library 
Director of Public Health. . . 
Director of Public Works 
Dog Officer. ...... 

Fire Chief ...... 

Forestry Superintendent 
Game Warden. ..... 

Deputy Game Warden . 



Gas Inspector. .... 

Highway Superintendent 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Inspector of Buildings . . 

Ass't. Inspector of Buildings. . . 
Inspector of Wires ......... 

Ass't. Inspector of Wires. .... 

Police Chief ............ 

Police Legal Adviser ........ 

Recreation/Community Schools Director 
Sanitary & Plumbing Inspector . . . ♦ e 

Ass't. Sanitary & Plumbing Inspector 
School Department : 

Visual Consultant ......... 

Head Nurse ............. 

Physician. ............. 

Attendance Officer ......... 

Dentists . . ....... 



Sealer of Weights and Measures .... 

Superintendent of Schools. ...... 

Superintendent of Spring Grove Cemetery 
Town Accountant. ........... 

Town Clerk ..... 

Ass't. Town Clerk. 
Town Counsel .... 

Ass't. Town Counsel, 
Town Engineer. . . . 
Town Manager .... 

Ass ' t . Town Manager 
Town Constables. . . 



Veterans' Service Agent. . . . 
Water and Sewer Superintendent 



Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

William Russell 

James F. Johnson 

Myron H. Muise 

Nancy C. Jacobson 

Neal D. McDowell 

Robert E . McQuade 

Donald V. Porter 

Henry L. Hilton 

James L . Bamf ord 

Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

James V. Deyermond 

Clifford A. Westcott 

Eugene A. Zalla, Jr. 

Walter R. Vogt 

John M. Lynch 

Thomas P. Walsh 

Arthur Peatman 

Sam J. DeSalvo 

Donald J. Ward 

Gilbert DeMoor 

David L. Nicoll 

John J. Willis, Jr. 

Gary C. Ralph 

Walter R. Vogt 

Harold A, Rutter, Jr. 

William V. Emmons, O.D. 

Ruth Westcott 

John J. McArdle, Jr., M D. 

Joseph Hastings 

Drs . Bernard Daly, Stephen H, 

Halem, Thomas J. Lamson, and 

Thomas J. Swift 

Newton A. Jones 

Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert 

Stephan J. Bamf ord 

Wendell A. Mattheson 

Elden R. Salter 

Olga Palenski 

Alfred L. Daniels 

Fredric S. O'Brien 

John Avery 

J. Maynard Austin 

Sheldon S. Cohen 

Benjamin C. Brown and Thomas 

P. Eldred 

John J. Lewis 

Ernest J. Cote 






The following people served during part of this 18-month period: 



Highway Superintendent ....... 

Housing Authority Executive Director 
Police Legal Adviser ........ 

School Attendance Officer. ..... 



Stanley Chlebowski 
James E . Manning . 
Laurence P. Melia. 
Richard Aumais . . 



Died 6/19/75 
Retired 1975 
Resigned 8/75 
Resigned 7/1/75 



173 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection . . . 
Assessors ■■.....'.... 

Assistant Town Manager. 
AVIS. . .....oo 

Bicentennial Committee . 
Bikeways Committee . . „ 
Board of Appeals. . . 
Board of Health „ . . . 
Board of Selectmen. . . 
Building Inspection . . 
CETA Program. ..... 

Civil Defense ..... 

Collector-Treasurer . . 
Conservation Commission 
Council on Aging. . . . 



Development and Industrial 

Commission. ......... 

Directory of Department Heads . 

Directory of Town Officials . . 

Dog Officer .......... 

Electrical Inspection ..... 

Engineering .......... 

Financial Statements. . . . . . 

Fire Department ........ 

Forestry. 

Fourth of July Celebration. . . 

Game Warden .......... 

Greater Lawrence Community Drug 
Council ........... 



69 
20 
11 
48 
46 
36 
33 
51 
5 
30 
14 
28 
19 
40 
42 

35 

173 

169 

25 

29 

69 

133 

24 

75 

50 

28 

56 



Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School ...... 59 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District. 58 

Greater Lawrence Solid Waste 

Committee ............ 57 

Highways. 73 

Historical Commission. ....... 49 

Housing Authority . , 36 

Inspection Services. ........ 29 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund. ... 13 

Jury List - 1975 .......... 80 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 68 

Memorial Hall Library. ....... 43 

Parks 74 

Planning Board . 32 

Police Department. ......... 26 

Recreation/Community Schools .... 38 

Sale of Property .......... 68 

Sewers ............... 72 

Solid Waste. ............ 77 

Spring Grove Cemetery. ....... 76 

Town Clerk ............. 16 

Town Counsel ............ 15 

Town Manager . 7 

Town Meeting Minutes - 1974. .... 86 

Town Meeting Minutes - 1975. .... 91 

Traffic Committee. 45 

Trustees Punchard Free School. ... 79 

Veterans' Services .... 47 

Water Department .......... 70 

Weights and Measures ........ 34 




ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASS. 



Annual 
Report 
for tlxe 

Town of 
Andover 



1976 



(January 1, 1976 through 
December 31, 1976) 

prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 

Chapter 40, Section 49 

of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

and Article II, Section Four 

of the By-Laws of the 

Town of Andover 




Board of Selectmen 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
01810 

March 8, 1977 



Dear Fellow Citizen; 



Since the first letter I have written on September 4, 
1974, Town Meeting time has been a time when I have urged you 
to balance your hopes and desires for Town services against 
the ability to pay in the form of taxation. 

As I wrote on September 4, 1974: 

" Impinging in substantial measure for the first time on 
Andover ' s local governance were some powerful external influ- 
ences: Regionalization, and problems of sewerage, clean water, 
and transportation; county government, with its problem of pro- 
fligate management and lack of orderly procedure; and lurking 
behind all these the possible disintegration of home rule through 
creeping metropolitanization. We must be ever vigilant to the 
negatives of these forces, while trying to achieve common solutions 
with our neighbors." 

Those words are as true today as when they were written. In 
addition, disposal of solid waste has moved to the top of our 
long-term "needs agenda." Above all, external resources to help 
reduce Andover ' s tax burden are diminishing. I know that future 
Boards of Selectmen will devote much effort to the external 
resource side of the ledger. As of today it is stylish to state 
that Andover is a "wealthy community." That simply is not true 
in its implications. Andover needs help as do other less fortun- 
ate communities in assisting worthwhile programs which will help 
solve problems of oar aging and marginally poor, as well as many 
capital expenditure programs. 

I believe Andover still remains healthy, but as I have 
said on numerous occasions, she needs your attendance and thought- 
ful support at Town Meeting. Andover is served by a dedicated 

cadre of employees and citizens performing public service they 

deserve your participation. 

And as I close my term as Chairman I wish to thank the 
many, many citizens of Andover who have helped make this great 
adventure in public service to the community I cherish a glorious 
and rewarding experience. 

Sincerely, 




Milton Greenberg N 
Chairman 



Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen held 23 regular meetings and 24 special meetings to- 
gether with one joint meeting with the School Committee during the period January 
1, 1976 through December 31, 1976. 

At the organizational meeting of March 23, 1976, following the election of 
Susan T. Poore and Richard J. Bowen to the Board, the following officers were 
elected by the Board: 

Chairman Milton Greenberg ; Vice-Chairman Alan F. French; and Secretary Janet 
D. Lake. 

Licenses and Permits 



In fulfilling the Selectmen's responsibilities as the Local Licensing Authority, 
the Board at every formal meeting considered applications for various licenses and 
permits required by State Statutes. During the calendar year of 1976, the following 
were granted. 



New Common Victualer 2 

Renewal of Common Victualer 32 

Renewal of Inn Holders 3 

Liquor : 

One-day Permits 10 

Law Violation 1 

Change of Mgr/Ownership 3 

Renewals - All Types 21 

Street Openings 73 

Class I Used Car 2 

Class II Used Car 



Storage of Inflammables 5 

Pole Locations: 

New 11 

Relocations 7 

On New Streets 35 

Underground Utilities 14 

House Moving 2 

Automatic Amusement Devices 5 

Auctioneer 5 

Approved Corporate Locations 6 



Bicentennial 

The Board of Selectmen enthusiastically supported the outstanding program 
developed by Andover's Bicentennial Committee under the leadership of Norma Gammon 
in celebrating our Nation's birthday. The members participated in numerous events 
of the year. These events are fully reported in the Bicentennial Committee's report 
in this Town Report and referred to in the resolution adopted on October 4, 1976. 

Flood Hazard Boundary Maps 

Conducted a public hearing on the preliminary flood hazard boundary maps, 
following which the Board recommended to HUD that the identification of flood hazard 
areas be limited to the flood plains of the Merrimack River and the Shawsheen River. 



Open Meeting Law 

While supporting the intent of the Open Meeting Law, the Selectmen expressed 
dissatisfaction with those restrictions within the law which do not allow private 
discussions with the Town Manager while exercising the Selectmen's responsibility 
under the Charter to support, apprise, evaluate and oversee the action of the Town 
Manager in his administration of the Town. 

Industrial and Commercial Development 

Established goals, duties and implementation guidelines for the Andover Devel- 
opment and Industrial Commission. 

Assigned to the Commission the task of securing a site within the Central 
Business District for a new postal facility. 

Requested the Development and Industrial Commission to promote the acquisition 
of the Sacred Heart property by an industrial, commercial, residential or institu- 
tional user whose development and use of the property would be in the best interest 
of the Town. 

Solid Waste 



Received through the year numerous reports from Selectmen Sullivan and Poore , 
the Town Manager and Public Works Director McQuade on the progress of the North East 
Solid Waste Committee in arranging for the construction and operation of a resource 
recovery facility by private industry in the area. Adopted a policy in October, 1976 
directing Andover 's representatives working with the North East Solid Waste Committee 
to strive for the completion of a contract with Universal Oil Products for a re- 
source recovery facility capable of generating electricity which would be the most 
financially advantageous from the standpoint of the Town of Andover as can be nego- 
tiated. The Selectmen shall, upon completion of the contract, intend to review its 
acceptability to the Town of Andover and applicability to the needs of Andover, to- 
gether with any available alternative and, if found acceptable, submit same to Town 
Meeting for acceptance. 

Local Growth Policy 

Established a Local Growth Policy Committee in accordance with the Massachusetts 
Growth Policy Development Act for the formulation of a growth and development policy 
for the Town of Andover. The Committee comprised the full Board of Selectmen as 
voting members, together with eleven non-voting members representing seven other 
Town boards and four private/public service organizations. 

Supported the soliciting of the views of the citizens through a successful 
growth policy questionnaire. 

Conducted two public hearings on the proposed growth policy and adopted a pol- 
icy in November and filed the same with the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission 
and the Office of State Planning. 

Recreation/Community Schools Program 

Agreed to evaluate the Recreation/Community Schools Department budget in terms 
of net cost, i.e. gross cost less revenue from fees charged for academic, enrichment 
and recreation activities. 

Ballardvale Community Center 

Established a nine-member Ballardvale Community Center Study Committee to study 
and report on the current condition of the Ballardvale Community Center and its 
present and potential use. 



Street Layouts 

Laid out nineteen new streets for consideration by Town Meetings for acceptance. 

Traffic 

Amended the Town Traffic Rules and Orders several times during the year to reg- 
ulate parking on Whittier Street, Central Street, Essex Street and Ballardvale Road 
and regulated the speed of traffic on Salem Street and Lupine Road. 

Approved a set of pedestrian regulations. 

Commuter Rail Service 

Because of the decline in patronage and the three-fold rise in the cost to the 
Town of commuter rail service between Andover and Boston, voted to notify MBTA to 
terminate passenger rail service as of April 15, 1976. 

Friendly Visitor Program 

Endorsed the concept of the Friendly Visitor Program and accepted money from 
the Smith-Puren Fund as seed money for the program through June 30, 1978. If suc- 
cessful, consideration would be given to continuing the program utilizing Town funds. 

Post Office 

The matter of a new postal facility for the Town of Andover was discussed nu- 
merous times during the year. Several conferences were held with the Planning Board 
and representatives of the U. S. Postal Service. The Board actively opposed the 
Andover Street site on the property of Sidney P. White and rejected Dale Street and 
Stevens Street as possible sites. The Board followed a consistent policy that any 
new postal facility should be a full-service facility together with mail handling 
and should be located within the Central Business District. 

The Board is confident that such a full-service facility, within the Central 
Business District, is achievable. 

Sacred Heart 

During the year the Selectmen received and discussed numerous reports by Town 
officials and committees on the efforts of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart to dis- 
pose of their property. Particular consideration was given to the proposal of the 
Crowninshield Corporation for the use of the main Sacred Heart Building, the former 
American Woolen Corporate Office Building, for conversion into apartments. 

Sanitary Sewer Improvement Program 

Reviewed a four-part sanitary sewer improvement program, having an estimated 
cost of $9.46 million dollars with Federal and State funds participating at the rate 
of 90 per cent. The Selectmen selected from that program the reconstruction of the 
Riverina Road Pumping Station and the reconstruction of the outfall sewer from the 
pumping station to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Interceptor Sewer along 
the Merrimack River. It was the intent of the Board of Selectmen to request $15,000 
at the Special October Town Meeting for initial engineering relating to the project. 
However, the October Town Meeting failed to materialize by reason of a lack of a 
quorum. The Selectmen later decided to postpone the project for one year. 

Harbridge House Report 

The members of the Board of Selectmen participated during the first six months 
of 1976 in numerous conferences with members of the Harbridge House, the Town Man- 
ager and the Assistant Town Manager in developing communications and recommendations 
for improving the execution of the Town's general management functions. In June, 
the Board decided not to proceed with the recommendations contained in the report 
for the employment of a second assistant administrator and instead reaffirmed 



its direction that the Town Manager to employ a central purchasing agent. 

Superintendent of Maintenance of Municipal Buildings 

At the conclusion of a June joint meeting of the members of the School Commit- 
tee and the Selectmen, it was decided not to employ a maintenance engineer with res- 
ponsibilities for both the School and Town buildings. Instead, the decision was 
made that the School Committee would proceed to hire such an individual for its 
buildings. 

Town's Credit Rating 

Chairman Milton Greenberg led the Andover delegation to New York City in Decem- 
ber in an effort to have Moody's Investment Service change Andover' s credit rating 
from Aa to Aaa. While the application was denied, foundation was laid for future 
improvement in the rating which bears on the interest rate charged the Town for bond 
issues . 



Town Manager 



As the Town Manager approaches the end of his three-year appointment as 
Andover' s Town Manager, it seems appropriate to comment not only on the activities 
and problems of Calendar Year 1976 but also on the past eight years, both as to 
achievements and major disappointments. 

First, addressing 1976, areas of special concentration of time and effort by 
the Town Manager included the Harbridge House study, regional solid waste, post 
office site selection and the Sacred Heart property. Each of these has long-term 
significance in the life of Andover. 

Post Office 



U. S. Postal Service officials advised the Town in August, 1975 that the pre- 
sent Post Office building and yard were inadequate for mail handling and that the 
Postal Service wished to construct a new facility in Andover. By fall 1975, the 
Postal Service had obtained an option from Sidney P. White for a parcel of land on 
Andover Street south of Argilla Road. The Selectmen and the Planning Board found 
this site to be unacceptable as it would serve as a nucleus in years to come for 
another commercial area in close proximity to Andover 's single Central Business 
District. Through the balance of 1975 and 1976, numerous conferences were held 
with postal authorities in an effort to reach an amicable solution. Both postal 
authorities and town officials submitted sites for consideration. These were 
located in the Central Business District, on Stevens Street, in Shawsheen Plaza, 
on Lowell Street, Frontage Road and Dale Street in Ballardvale. 

The Selectmen believe that the continuation of the Town's principal post office 
in the Central Business District is an important factor in the preservation of the 
Central Business District. Consequently, they have followed the policy of insisting 
that any new facility be located within the Central Business District and that such 
a facility not only contain full-customer service, but also provide for the mail 
handling operation. Promising sites on Dale Street and Stevens Streets were re- 
jected. The last action of the Selectmen in 1976 was to restate their policy and 
express optimism that their objective was achievable, even if not now evident. 

Sacred Heart 

The Brothers of the Sacred Heart announced in September, 1975 the closing of 
the junior high school that they had been operating for approximately 25 years in 
the former American Woolen Company's corporate office building in Shawsheen. The 
Brothers gave the Town the opportunity of acquiring that property, including the 
former office building, playing fields and the Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium. A study 

8 



committee was formed in November, 1974 with representatives from the Board of Select- 
men, School Committee, Recreation/Community Schools Committee, Planning Board, 
Conservation Commission, Library Trustees and citizens. They reported on November 
24, 1975 that they found no municipal use for the office building. In essence, Town 
officials did not consider the building suitable for a school, Town offices or a 
public library. 

In August, 1976, the Brothers located and brought to Andover The Crowninshield 
Corporation as a potential purchaser of the office building for conversion to a one 
and two-bedroom apartment building. 

With the help of the Development and Industrial Commission, the Planning Board, 
Conservation Commission, the Recreation/Community Schools Committee and the Select- 
men, the proposition was examined. The matters of zoning, traffic, land use and 
parking were considered. The proposition was found to be advantageous to the Town 
as the office building would be utilized in a manner generally acceptable to the 
area residents and returned to the tax rolls. 

This concentration of some 90 residential units in an already compact area of 
industry and residents requires that the bowling green between the Shawsheen River 
and South Main Street and the athletic fields south of Balmoral Street remain open 
and undeveloped. Town ownership of these areas would satisfy Andover' s long-standing 
zoning policy and provide open space for active and passive recreation. The year 
ended with The Crowninshield Corporation preparing for presentation of its case for 
a use variance before the Zoning Board of Appeals and the Town negotiating with the 
Brothers for the acquisition of the land and the gymnasium as authorized by Article 
47 of the 1976 Annual Town Meeting. 

Harbridge House Study 

The matter of the organization of Town Government to handle the business 
functions of the Town has been a concern of the Selectmen for several years. The 
1975 and again the 1976 Annual Town Meetings appropriated funds for the addition to 
the Town's staff of a Data Processing Coordinator, Purchasing Agent and Superin- 
tendent of Municipal Buildings. Each of these individuals was to be responsible 
for his respective functions in both the Town and School Departments. 

Questioning the wisdom of adding three individuals to the Town Manager's staff, 
all of whom would report to the Manager, the Selectmen directed the Town Manager in 
the spring of 1975 and again in the spring of 1976 to refrain from filling these 
positions. A series of conferences were held with the Town Manager and the Assis- 
tant Town Manager on the subject of organizing the Town for the business functions. 
Both the Selectmen and the Town Manager put forth proposals. No accord was reached. 
Consideration of the matter was dropped in March, 1975. 

Chairman Greenberg proposed in the fall of 1975 that a consulting firm be 
employed to produce recommendations for improving the organization and the manage- 
ment of the Town's information, financial management, central purchasing and build- 
ing maintenance functions. Harbridge House, Inc. , was jointly agreed upon as the 
consultant because it was believed it was well equipped to enhance communications 
and clarify understandings of the relative roles and responsibilities of the Select- 
men and the Town Manager in the execution of the Town's business functions. Harbridge 
House was to identify differences and help find a common ground for agreement on how 
to reorganize the top levels of Town Government for more efficient and effective 
operation of the Town's business functions. 

For purposes of the study, it was agreed that the business function would be 
defined as: 

Financial management/budgeting 

Data processing/management information 

Procurement/purchasing and contracting 

Building maintenance and alterations 

9 



It was also agreed that the principal thrust and primary objectives to be 
accomplished by reorganization of the Town's business functions would be: 

1. Improved flow of meaningful management information within and between 
the various major elements of Town Government. 

— Enhanced management, analytic and information processing capacities 
within the top echelons of Town Government 

— Less reliance on manual processing of data 

— More timely readouts of budgeted versus expended dollars, by 
department 

— Better fiscal and statistical forecasts and projections 

— Initiation of productivity and cost effectiveness computer analyses 

— Introduction of performance ratios into management reports 

— More systematic analyses of cash flow implications (such as lease/buy) 
for decision making 

2. Implementation of recent recommendations for upgrading specific Town 
business functions. 

— More cost effective purchasing through centralized procurement, 
volume buying and better specifications. 

— Expanded and centralized computer processing facilities for the 
Town and School Department. 

— More efficient and higher quality building maintenance and alterations 
through centralized administration under a technical specialist. 

3. Closer supervision and coordination of Town officers, employees, boards 
and committees. 

— Clearer articulation and documentation of Selectmanic policies and 
priorities 

— More rapid, accurate and forceful transmission of Selectmanic policies 
and priorities to Town officers, employees, boards and committees 

— Reduction of Town Manager's span of control to more manageable 
proportions 

— More effective use of staff meetings by Town Manager and his 
administrative personnel 

After having reviewed thoroughly the present execution of the Town's business 
functions and having given due consideration to the advantages and disadvantages 
of alternate organizational approaches within the context of Andover's Town Govern- 
ment, Harbridge House recommended the following structural changes for improved 
execution of the Town's business functions: 

1. The immediate office of the Town Manager shall be reorganized and re- 
structured as shown in the Chart below. 

2. The Town Manager should be supported by three Deputy Town Managers — for 
Administration and Finance, Community Planning and Development and Public 
Services — each of whom should function with a significant level of pro- 
fessional latitude and autonomy while reporting directly to the Town 
Manager. 

10 



3. Initially, the present Town Manager should also fill the newly created 
position of Deputy Town Manager for Public Services until such time as 
it becomes feasible and necessary for the Town to hire a full-time 
professional for this position. (The incumbent Town Manager should not 
receive added compensation for serving as Acting Deputy for Public 
Services. ) 

4. The position of Assistant Town Manager should be abolished and the 
position of Deputy Town Manager for Community Planning and Development 
should be created in its place. The present Assistant Town Manager 
should serve as the new Deputy for Community Planning and Development. 

5. A professional with at least five years of experience in municipal 
government and a strong financial analysis background should be re- 
cruited to fill the newly created position of Deputy Town Manager for 
Administration and Finance. 



Immediate 
Office of 

Town 
Manager 



Town Manager 



Deputy for 

Administration 

and Finance 



Town Counsel 



Deputy for 
Public Services 



Deputy for 

Community Plannin; 

and Development 



Personnel Director 
Purchasing Agent 
Data Processing Spe- 
cialist 
Town Clerk's Office 
Board of Assessors 
Town Accountant 
Collector-Treasurer 
Retirement Board 
Towle Trust Fund 
Cornell Trust Funds 



Police Department 

Fire Department 

Public Works Department 

Board of Health 

General Construction In- 
spector 

Electrical Inspector 

Building Inspector 

Sealer of Weights and 
Measures 

Inspection Services 

Library 

Council on Aging 

Veterans Services 

School Building Com- 
mission 

Greater Lawrence Sani- 
tary District Repre- 
sentative 

Greater Lawrence Solid 
Waste Commission 
Reoresentative 

Fourth of July Commis- 
sion 

Patriotic and Civic 
Celebrations 



Planning Board 

Planning Board of Appeals 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Recreation and Commun- 
ity Schools 

Development and Indus- 
trial Commission 

Conservation Commission 

Historic Commission 

Andover Historical Dis- 
trict Study Commission 

Merrimac Valley Planning 
Commission Representa 
tive 

Greater Lawrence Com- 
munity Action Council 
Representative 

Regional Transportation 
Authority Representative 

Ipswich River Watershed 
District Representative 

Transportation Policy Ad- 
visory Group 

Building Maintenance and 
Alterations 



Following the submission of the report in April, 1976 several conferences were 
held by the Selectmen with the Town Manager and the Assistant Town Manager. The 
Selectmen raised the question as to whether the Manager was sufficiently committed 
to the concept of the report to effectively implement it. The Town Manager believed 
that initially the function of budget analysis should lie with the Planning and 
Development Deputy. The Selectmen aligned themselves with the consultant that this 
function should be handled by the Administration and Finance Deputy. 



11 



The assignment of functions between the various Town departments is the respon- 
sibility of the Town Manager. By Charter, he is authorized to make such assignments 
without the approval of the Selectmen. He is then held accountable for the results 
of such assignments. 

It became evident that it was up to the Town Manager to resolve the impasse so 
as to be able to proceed with the implementation of the report and to carry out the 
intention of Town Meeting to employ professional people to handle central data pro- 
cessing, centralized purchasing and supervision of the maintenance of all Town and 
School buildings. 

By a communication of June 23, 1976, the Town Manager advised the Selectmen 
that he had no problem accepting the concept of the Harbridge House report, as 
jointly developed, and would assent to the Selectmen's position that the budgetary 
function be assigned to the A & F Deputy. Unfortunately, by that time the Selectmen 
had decided not to implement the Harbridge House report, but instead directed the 
Town Manager to employ a central purchasing agent. Following the Selectmen's meeting 
when that decision was announced, the Town Manager was advised by the Chairman that 
he would not be reappointed come September, 1977. 

Regional Solid Waste Problem 

The Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee was formed in December, 1973 with 
Selectman Edmund Sullivan serving as Andover's representative. Public Works 
Director McQuade and the Town Manager instituted the practice of attending the 
Committee's meetings with Mr. Sullivan. This practice has continued, with the 
Town now represented by Selectman Susan Poore. 

This is really the area's third attempt at finding a solution to the solid 
waste problem. The first began in 1969 with an informal committee of regional 
municipal officials with Selectman William Stewart, Joseph Odium and Dr. Douglas 
Dunbar as Andover's representatives. This was followed in 1971 with the inaugura- 
tion of the Greater Lawrence Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board, established 
under certain sections of the statutes with Town Meeting approval. Robert McQuade, 
Joseph Odium and Eugene Hand were appointed by the Town Moderator to represent 
Andover. 

Utilizing State funds, Camp, Dresser & McKee made a study of alternate solutions 
to the problem and recommended a regional landfill in Methuen as a temporary solution, 
awaiting further development of solid waste technology. This solution was unaccept- 
able to Methuen and the plan died. 

With the State Bureau of Solid Waste serving as catalyst to bring together 
representatives from the cities and towns and providing funds for professional 
consulting services, the Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee started to explore 
alternatives. The approach recommended by the Bureau of Solid Waste was that the 
cities and towns organize on a volunteer basis, select a site for a resource recovery 
facility, select a process and a contractor to construct and operate the facility 
and actively participate in the development of a contract between the successful 
contractor and the cities and towns. 

A request for proposals developed by the Mitre Corporation in consultation with 
the Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee went out in November, 1974. Members of 
the Committee, representatives from The Mitre Corporation and the Bureau of Solid 
Waste collectively reviewed the proposals. By August, 1975, Universal Oil Products 
(UOP) was selected as the company to build and operate a resource recovery facility, 
which would burn refuse in a Martin Boiler and generate steam, which in turn would 
be used to generate electricity for sale to Massachusetts Electric Company. The 
site selected by the Committee was an isolated parcel of land adjacent to the 
Merrimack River in Haverhill. The site selection process has had to be repeated, 
however, as Haverhill's voters, in November, 1976 disapproved the facility being 
located within their community. 

In addition to attending the regular meetings of the Committee, which has now 
been expanded to some 14 communities and renamed the North East Solid Waste Committee, 

12 



the Town Manager has served as Chairman of the Negotiating Committee. Currently, 
the UOP contract is in its third draft. The Committee is assisted by The Mitre 
Corporation, Bureau of Solid Waste and former Maiden Mayor } Attorney Walter Kelliher, 
serving as the negotiator for the cities and town. 

These We Did Together 

Achievements under any administration are never the sole accomplishment of the 
chief administrator. This is certainly so in Andover and the administration of 
this Town Manager. In every achievement, members of elected and appointed boards, 
department heads, employees and citizens contributed significantly and I wish here 
to so acknowledge. 

The Department of Public Works - The Department of Public Works was established in 
July, 1970 with the appointment of Robert McQuade bringing together under a depart- 
ment head former departments of Highway, Parks, Water, Sewer, Vehicular Maintenance, 
Solid Waste, Forestry and Cemetery. The Town Manager was aided in this selection 
process by a selection committee consisting of Joseph McCarthy, Robert Radula and 
Sidney White. 

Mr. McQuade came to Andover as an exceptionally well-qualified sanitary 
engineer with extensive knowledge of the Town and its water and sewerage system. 
This has been an excellent appointment, as Mr. McQuade has contributed significantly 
in the administration of the department, the construction of the water treatment 
facility, planning for improvements and extensions of the water and sewerage systems, 
and in the area of solid waste collection and regional solution for solid waste dis- 
posal. Few managers have lucked into the availability of such a qualified individual 
living within the Town. 

Landfill Closed - Municipal Refuse Collection Inaugurated - The landfill area off 
Ledge Road in West Andover was closed in June, 1973. By that date, the area was nearly 
filled and was a source of pollution to the Town's water supply. Andover's first 
municipal rubbish-collection program was inaugurated in July, 1973, using the 
services of a private contractor. Separate garbage collection was terminated in 
May, 1975, allowing a combined collection at a substantially reduced cost to the 
taxpayer. 

The rubbish collection system chosen was curb-side collection utilizing the 
plastic bag as the only accepted container for citizen use in disposing of his 
waste. The bags are purchased wholesale and sold to local merchants for retail 
sale to the citizens. The result has been an efficient collecting process which 
has been reflected in the price bid twice by the successful contractor. Public 
Works Director McQuade and Veterans' Service Agent John Lewis contributed signi- 
ficantly to the success of the transition from the landfill to Town wide rubbish 
collection with out-of-town disposal. 

Recycling - With the persevering and enthusiastic Recycling Committee of the League 
of Women Voters under the chairmanship of Elaine Katz and later Margaret Pustell, 
the Town inaugurated a curb-side pickup of such recyclables as tin, glass and paper. 
The Committee's ever-present assistance in the public educational program and advice 
to Town officials on customer reaction has contributed immeasurably to the success 
of the program. Again, John Lewis contributed measurably to the success of the 
program. 

Appointments - Among the department heads appointed during this administration were 
Assistant Town Manager Sheldon S. Cohen, Public Works Director McQuade, Town Clerk 
Elden Salter, Recreation/Community Schools Director Gary Ralph, Public Health 
Director McDowell and Myron H. Muise as combined Collector/Treasurer. The Town 
Manager is well pleased with these appointments. 

Drainage - An annual storm drainage program was inaugurated in 1970 with an appro- 
priation of $50,000. Each year thereafter, $100,000 has been appropriated. Some 
7.23 miles of new drains have been installed, alleviating drainage problems in many 
sections of Andover. Projects have been selected on the basis of greatest need. 
Unfortunately, the program must continue for many years before these problems are 
completely eliminated. 

13 



Water Treatment Plant - Ground was broken in 1970 for the Town's water filtration 
plant on the shore of Haggetts Pond. This construction culminated planning which 
was begun under Town Manager Thomas Duff and continued under Town Manager Richard 
Bowen. The plant went on-line in May, 1974 following a trying construction period. 
Fortunately, under the watchful eyes of Robert McQuade, representatives from Camp, 
Dresser & McKee and several subconsulting firms, Project Engineer Chester Pease and 
Inspector Albert Guerin, the plant was satisfactorily completed. 

With nearly continuous consultation with Camp, Dresser & McKee' s Charles 
Parthum and his staff, Robert McQuade and Town Counsel Alfred Daniels, negotiations 
were carried on with the contractor to keep the contractor on the job nearly to 
completion. The project was concluded without any litigation between the Town and 
the contractor. Under the conditions that existed throughout the project, this was 
indeed an accomplishment. The building design, both architecturally and function- 
ally, and the construction are a credit to the Town and the members responsible for 
each pnase of design and construction. 

Recreation/Community Schools Department - The Town Manager, with the assistance of 
School Superintendent Kenneth Seifert and Recreation Study Committee Chairman 
Richard Barney introduced the Community Schools concept in Andover in 1971. The 
Selectmen and School Committee accepted the concept and the Recreation Study Commit- 
tee assisted effectively in the selection of Gary Ralph as the first director in 
June, 1972. 

Through Mr. Ralph's able and effective leadership and with continued advice 
and assistance from Dr. Seifert and members of the Recreation/Community Schools 
Committee, Andover today has an excellent program for citizens of all ages. The 
program addresses the recreation, academic and enrichment needs of the citizens 
throughout the year. For the Fall of 1976, 123 courses were given for 2,212 
citizens, with a Winter enrollment for 313 courses of 1742 and a Spring enrollment 
for some 12 courses of 240. There were also many youths and adults of both sexes 
being involved in physical recreation programs at the various school gymnasiums. 

The summer playground program has been improved to include instructional 
activities as well as an extended play program. An all-purpose concrete slab was 
constructed at Recreation Park providing for summer basket ball and winter skating. 
Pomps Pond bathhouse was constructed with the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, U. S. 
Department of the Interior, providing 50 percent of the construction cost. The 
beach front has been improved substantially eliminating the disagreeable bottom 
and riley water. 

Assistant Town Manager - With active support of Chairman Milton Greenberg and the 
Selectmen, an appropriation was obtained in 1973 for an Assistant Town Manager. 
Aided by the Selectmen in the selection process, Sheldon Cohen became Andover 's 
first Assistant Town Manager on August 13, 1973. The choice has proven to be an 
excellent one, Mr. Cohen brought with him a background in public housing adminis- 
tration, grantmanship, planning and budgeting. Mr. Cohen has worn many hats carrying 
the budget-making process, the development and filing of applications for Federal 
grants, assistance to the Development & Industrial Commission, Recreation Open Space 
Advisory Committee, purchasing, personnel administration and collective bargaining. 
He further serves as the Town's representative on the Merrimack Valley Planning 
Commission's Transportation Planning Group. 

Water System Improvement Program - With the completion of an updated water system 
master plan in December, 1973, several projects for improving the water distribution 
system have been undertaken in accordance with the report's recommendation. Some 
3.64 miles of new water mains have been installed in various areas in the Town. 
The Holt Hill open reservoir has been replaced with a three million gallon enclosed 
concrete tank. This tank will be put on line in the Spring of 1977. 

Financial Reporting - At the instigation of Selectman Milton Greenberg, the Town 
Manager developed an annual waterworks balance sheet format portraying the expendi- 
tures and revenues of this self-sufficient department. 

At the request of Selectman Alan French for a better approach to analyzing the 

14 



proposed expenditures and revenues and their effects on the tax rate, the Town 
Manager developed the tax model. This model is now an integral part of the budget- 
ing process. It formally integrates the State cherry sheet, the recapitulation 
sheet and the school tax rate computation sheet. The latter two are state forms 
used in the development of the tax rate. 

Inspection Program - As residential construction has continued at a substantial rate 
in Andover and as that construction has been taking place at an increasing rate in 
poorer land, inspection services have required strengthening. These involve the 
Building Inspection with the addition of an assistant inspector, employing full-time 
electrical and plumbing inspectors instead of part-time inspectors, the adding of 
two technicians in the Health Department, replacing the part-time sanitarian to 
handle the individual subsurface sewerage disposal inspections as well as the in- 
spection of food establishments, and the appointment of a construction inspector to 
oversee the construction of subdivisions. Far better control over these construction 
activities has been achieved through these appointments. 

Building, Construction and Renovations - The West Elementary School addition was 
completed in 1970 and the Doherty and Shawsheen Schools were renovated in 1973. 
The two school building committees under the chairmanship of James St. Germain 
gave the Town the benefit of their time and talent to achieve these successful 
projects. Each is worthy of commendation. 

The Public Safety Center was completed in 1970 with the Public Safety Center 
Building Committee assuming the leadership in the design and construction of the 
facility. 

The first floor of the Town Hall has been renovated allowing the relocation of 
the Town Clerk and the Town Treasurer, improving the office environment for the 
departments of Treasurer/Collector, Town Clerk and Assessor ing. 

Industrial Development - The most significant development in the area of industrial 
development has been the opening of the West Andover Industrial Area with the con- 
struction of the Hewlett-Packard building in 1975-76. This became possible through 
the acquisition by Arkwright-Boston of some 550 acres, formerly separately owned 
parcels in the four quadrants formed by the intersection of 1-93 and River Road. 
The second key factor in the opening of this area, which has all the earmarks of 
being an exceptionally attractive industrial park, was the construction of the West 
Andover Sanitary Sewer from within Lawrence, along the Merrimack River to the 
Hewlett-Packard area. To secure the necessary appropriation for this sanitary 
sewer, assistance and cooperation were provided by the Selectmen, Development & 
Industrial Commission, Planning Board, Conservation Commission and the Andover 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Disappointments - 

Town Planning - Town Planning in the broader sense has suffered from the lack of a 
professional person working with the Town Manager, Selectmen, Planning Board, 
Development & Industrial Commission and department heads. In the absence of such 
a professional person, at least one-third of the Assistant Town Manager's time has 
been siphoned off to handle certain planning functions. 

Town/School Cooperation - The Town Manager has enjoyed a very pleasant and very 
productive relationship with School Superintendent Kenneth Seifert. This has been 
reflected in the area of school renovations, the Recreation/Community Schools pro- 
gram, the North School for Special Needs and the maintenance and improvement of 
school grounds. My main disappointment has come through the failure to take ad- 
vantage of the unusual opportunity to employ an individual responsible for the 
maintenance of all Town and School buildings and the development of a joint data 
processing system. Funds were appropriated at the 1975 Annual Town Meeting and 
again at the 1976 Annual Town Meeting for both, along with funds for a central 
purchasing agent. The funds were frozen awaiting the approval and implementation 
of a reorganization of the Town's business functions. The Harbridge House recom- 
mendations were tabled. Authorization to appoint a purchasing agent came 15 months 
after Town Meeting appropriated funds for this position. 

15 



It is rare, indeed, that the Selectmen, School Committee, the School Super- 
intendent and the Town Manager and Finance Committee could agree on the desirability 
of having these three functions handled on a joint basis. Such an agreement appeared 
to have been reached but implementation has not materialized. 

Central Business District Traffic - Substantial money was spent by the State in 
developing plans for the improvement of traffic flow along Main Street under the 
so-called Topics Program. Many conferences were held with Town and State officials, 
the State Engineer's consultant and representatives from the Center Merchants. Sub- 
stantial modifications of the plans were achieved, but unfortunately negotiations 
reached a point where future modifications to satisfy the needs of the merchants 
could not be achieved. The State has maintained that the plans must satisfy Federal 
guidelines of the Topics Program, This would mean the loss of 18 to 20 on-street 
parking spaces. This project has been stalled since June, 1975. 



Assistant Town Manager 



In addition to general staff service to the Town Manager and Board of Select- 
men, 1976 saw the Assistant Town Manager particularly involved in several areas of 
key importance to Andover today and in the future. 

Many of these are related to community development (broadly defined), as 
Andover faces increasing challenges in maintaining the quality of existing develop- 
ment and planning for the expected demands of the next several years. 

Growth Policy - served as Secretary of Andover' s Local Growth Policy Committee, 
coordinating the Committee's activities over several months. This work included 
overseeing the accomplishment of a survey of all households in Andover, with a 25 
percent rate of response. 

Capital Budgeting - supervised the preparation of a capital programming system 
for Andover, expected to be implemented in 1977. This was the main project of 
Steven L. Ledoux, a Summer Student in Public Administration from Cornell University. 

Sacred Heart Property - following approval of Article 47 by the 1976 Annual 
Town Meeting, coordinated preparation of an application for Federal assistance, in 
the acquisition of the open space area, expected to bring Andover more than 
$100,000. 

Post Office Facilities - provided extensive staff work during protracted 
negotiations with the U. ST Postal Service. 

Flood Plain Zoning - served as Town's main contact with the U. S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development and its contractors as these organizations moved 
forward substantially in their work regarding Andover. 

Public Works Grant - coordinated preparation. of Andover's application for a 
$1.82 million grant. Although initially not successful because of Andover's high 
per-capita income, reasonable optimism remains for funding of this application in 
1977. 

Lowell Junction Interchange - represented Andover as the locus planning study 
for this project was completed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, re- 
affirming the extraordinary economic benefits this project would have for Greater 
Lawrence and the Commonwealth. 

Essex County Advisory Board - served as Secretary of this statutory body. 
Essex County will cost Andover about $740,000 in Fiscal Year 1977 and $890,000 
in Fiscal Year 1978. 



16 



Town Clerk 



In 1975 new precinct lines were drawn for the redistricting of the Town and 
reported in the State Census. Although the new precinct lines were designed in 
1975, the Statutes required that the old six precinct division be maintained 
through the 1976 State elections. After the November election this office began 
again the task of reverting back to the eight precinct alignment. At the conclusion 
of 1976 the total number of registered voters was 15,300, divided among the new 
eight precincts as follows: 



1 


1,874 


2 


1,974 


3 


2,137 


4 


1,964 



5 


1,823 


6 


1,841 


7 


1,854 


8 


1,833 



The increase in new voting precincts meant locating two additional voting places 
and the following locations were approved by the Board of Selectmen, to be in 
effect commencing with the Town election in 1977: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 
Precinct Seven 
Precinct Eight 



Elm Street 
Central Street 
Haverhill Street 
Beacon Street 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Clark Road 
Phillips Street 
South Main Street 



Free Church 

Baptist Church 

Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium 

West Elementary School 

St. Robert Bellarmine Church 

Ballardvale United Church 

Peabody House 

Faith Lutheran Church 

The following Statistical and Financial Reports are for the period from January 

1, 1976 to December 31, 1976. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Number of births recorded: 194 

Males 95 

Females 99 

Number of marriages recorded: 265 

Number of deaths recorded: 165 

Males 78 

Females 87 

The number of dog licenses sold was 2,319. The total amount collected was 
$9,623.00 all of which was submitted to the Town Treasurer. Of this amount 
$2,972.65 was retained by the Town and the balance sent to the County Treasurer. 



17 



The number of Fishing and Hunting licenses sold was 978. The total amount 
collected was $7,572.15. Of this amount $234.15 was submitted to the Town Treasurer 
and retained by the Town. The balance was sent to the Division of Fisheries and 
Game . 



Other monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Intentions 

Certified copies - Vital Statistics 

Uniform Commercial Code recorded 

Miscellaneous Licenses (Common vict . , 
Auctioneers, etc.) 

Alcoholic Beverage Licenses 

Business Certificates 

Miscellaneous (Storage of inflammables, 
street lists, Maps, etc.) 



! 744.00 
1,541.00 
1,814.00 

1,270.00 

20,150.00 

45.00 

2,470.00 



Total monies collected were $31 , 238 . 70. Of this amount $23,900.70 was turned 
over to the Town Treasurer and $7,338.00 was sent to the Division of Fisheries 
and Game. 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 



Under the terms of her will, the late Mrs. Margaret G. Towle, long-term resi- 
dent of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be 
held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 
Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this 
fund "be devoted to the assistance or the procurement of assistance for worthy per- 
sons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or support 
on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The fund is administered by a group of three trustees, chosen by the Town Mana- 
ger with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from 
the fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle ' s will. The cases are referred 
to the trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and in- 
terested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the trustees acted on thirty-nine cases, dis- 
bursing $32,591.16 on approved cases which numbered thirty-five. Only the income of 
the fund is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the 
current income is invested under the direction of the trustees. All disbursements 
are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the trustees. 



Balance of Income 



Receipts - 1976 



Disbursements - 1976 

Balance of Income - December 31, 1976 



$ 84,112.09 

29,608.48 
$113,720.57 

32,591,16 
$ 81,129.41 



18 



John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 



The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund dates back to Article 17 of the March 6th 
Town Meeting of 1893. An original bequest of $5,000.00 was to be administered by 
three Trustees chosen at the Annual Town Meeting. The income was to be used for the 
purchase of wood or coal for the worthy poor of Andover. 

On January 15, 1972, by vote of the Trustees, all of the funds were consoli- 
dated into the Andover Savings Bank. The income is accounted for by the Town 
Treasurer, and disbursement authorization is given by at least two Trustees. Be- 
cause most home heating is now accomplished by oil the Fund has had little use in 
the past few years. 

Balance on hand December 31, 1975 $9,202.85 
Interest earned 75/76 503.09 

Balance on hand December 31, 1976 $9,705.94 



Collector-Treasurer 



The Collector /Treasurer' s office is responsible for the collection and dis- 
bursement of all Town funds. The Collector's staff is presently made up of three 
clerks, two of whom handle the bookkeeping for all town receipts except water. 
One clerk is responsible for the water department receipts and miscellaneous 
office tasks. The Treasurer's staff is made up of two clerks who handle all dis- 
bursements (including payrolls, Blue Cross/Blue Shield and bill payments). All 
clerks are completely knowledgeable in their departments and are therefore able to 
handle all department functions. 

The current Tax Collector was appointed August 22, 1966 upon the retirement of 
the former collector. On December 8, 1971 the job of Town Collector and Treasurer 
was combined upon the retirement of the former Treasurer. 

An excerpt from the 1966 Town Report on tax receipts as compared to 1976 shows 
considerable changes. 

1966 1976 

Committed 

Total All Taxes $ 4,472,030.17 $14,355,643.68 

Collected 

Real Estate $3,504,436.79 $12,084,563.58 

Personal Property 168,632.28 535,570.11 

Motor Vehicle 562,208.15 1,033,372.32 

All Other 75,758.76 68,706.51 

$4,311,035.98 $13,722,212.52 



19 



3 



S 



NO 
U I**. 

w on 

►J ^ 
►J 

O 

u 



o 
u 



in 

u 

2 rH 

<J <N 



I-. O 


LO 


CO 


o 


o 


o r» 


CN 


NO 


o 


■■«■. 


r-^ m 


i-l 


r-~ 


m 


no 


i-l CM 


00 


i-i 


■-( 


LO 


o in 


LTl 


oo 


7-t 


o 












<t on 


00 


NO 




CTN 


On co 


r-~ 






I-l 


CO i-l 


CM 






oo 












NO 








NO 


■CO- 








■CO- 



o 

00 



00 no 


o 


ON 


CO 


r-» no 


m 


1-1 


I-l 


CN NO 


<r 


m i 


CTN 


<f 00 


00 


on 


o 


r^ cm 


NO 


NO 


<r 










•J- CM 






00 


r-l r-t 






CM 


■co- 






■CO- 


on <t 


o 


o 


CO 


CM i-l 


CM 


CO 


ctn 


NO NO 


r~- 


I-l 1 


o 


m oo 


\o 


o 


I-l 


o o 


CO 


CO 


00 










r-~ in 


■vt 




vD 


en r». 






i-l 


r-l 






CM 


<o- 






•CO- 



CM CM 

h- r-. 


00 
CO 


NO 
CTN 


in 


co 

in 


CM O 
00 CM 

oo m 


o 
no 


m 
o 




CM 
CM 












•J- NO 

O r^ 

i-l 00 


I-l 

CM 


in 
in 




CTN 
O 
CO 












NO 

•co- 








-co- 



o o 


co 


m 


in 


CO 


t-l CTN 


CO 


r~- 


r^ 


00 


m m 


<f 


CTn 


CM 


i^ 


<}■ o- 


o 


CM 


CTN 


i-l 


CM 00 


CTN 


i-l 


m 


p^ 












r-l 00 


co 


CM 




no 


CM l~^ 


m 


NO 




I-l 


NO O 


m 






co 












CM i-l 








«* 


i-l 








I-l 


■co- 








■co- 



in 


NO O 
NO 00 


m 


no 

nD 


00 
CM 


CTN O 

m co 


VO 


in 

CO 

oo 










CTN 


NO CO 
CM 




CM 



CM 1 


1 1 


NO 


oo 


CO 




o 


CO 


CTN 




m 


o- 










CM 






oo 


CM 






CM 


■CO- 






■CO- 


<f 00 


in 




r- 


00 r-l 


00 




00 


r^ CM 


r^ i 


i 


r^ 


CM CTN 


i-i 




CO 


CM CO 






NO 










O NO 






NO 


CM 






CM 


•co- 






-co- 


o r- 


o 






CTN o 


r^ 




NO 


CO CM 


CTN 1 


i 


« 


■* r-1 


CO 




m 


00 o 


CM 




CTN 


A A 






o 


<-t <f 






m 


r-l r-l 






NO 
CNI 


■co- 






■co- 



O 


i-i 


CO 
CO 


o 
in 


00 


00 
00 


00 

o 


CN 


1-1 
m 
in 


m 

CM 


m 
o 

CTN 


1-1 

00 














CO 
CTN 
00 


CN 

o- 

i-i 


O 

NO 

CM 




i-l 

i-l 


1^- 

o 

CO 














in 
■co- 










NO 

■co- 



m 


m 


00 


00 


m 


m 


CN 


CM 


ON 


ON 


"1 II 




00 


00 


CO 


co 



no t~~ 


00 


o 


CM 


CO 


O 00 


CTN 


in 


00 


CM 


in cm 


r-. 


in 


NO 


00 


r- co 


r-. 


CN 


m 


NO 


oo m 


o 


i-i 


o 


NO 












i-i r^ 


<t 




CO 


NO 


o CO 


NO 




i-i 


1-1 


O r-l 


CN 






<f 












NO 








NO 


•co- 








-CO- 



CTN r-l O 
-d" CTN CO 

CM CTN CO 

no m o 
cm no m 



oo 



oo 
■co- 



co m 

o o 

co* r»" 

[^ NO 

CO T-l 



o cm m 

o NO NO 

oo ■*- oo 

on co m 

o m r» 

co oo cm 

CN 

•CO- 



NO CO 


co 


CM 


r-l 


«* sf 


<r 


00 


I-l 


CN O 


CO 


i-l 


CO 


CO i-l 


r-- 


CTN 


1-1 


NO NO 


co 


o- 


1-1 










NO <f 


CO 




in 


00 i-l 






o 

i-l 


■co- 






■CO- 



<t t-l 

r-l ON 


in 

CO 


CM 
00 


CM 
CM 


r-l O 

r-. no 


o 

nO 


i-l 
CTN 


in 










cm m 
O «ct 

r-l 

■co- 


NO 




m 
m 

i-i 

■co- 



o o o 

o o o 

CO O 

o o 

o o 

m m 

o m 

r-~ no 



oo o 


CO 












CO ON 


r^. 












CM NO 


T-l 












CO o 


CO 












m cm 


r^ 


























co in 


O 












r-l CM 


«* 












■co- 


CM 




CO 












g 


CO 




o 


Q 






H 




pj 


fa 






s 






§ 


CO 






w 


Q 




w 


O 






> 


^i 




fa 


rJ 






§ 


o 




Q 


u 






pa 




a 


fa 
fa 






fa 


fa 






o 






o 


o 




w 
fa 


fa 


co 




o 


2 

O 




g 


3 


§ 




M 
H 


H 




CO 


g 


fa co 




< < 




fa 




T> 




fa 


fa 




[J 


CO 


oi c 




h- 1 


M 




H 


w 


3 3 


CO 


u 

M 


H 


g 


M 
H 


$ 


0) 


T3 


H 


H 


CO 




M 


> cu 
CU 3 


C 
3 


3 
< 


^ 


CO 

M 


% 


H 


OS CI 


fa 








H 


% 


CU 




S 


2 


Q 




r-l > 


CU 


M 


M 


S 


2 


H 


CD CU 


3 






O 


fa 




U Pd 


C 


00 


CO 


m 


fa 


fa 


CU 1 


CU 


*z 


2 




H 


fa 


TJ C 


> 


2 


< 


w 


fa 


fa! 


cu o 


CU 


O 


O 


2 


M 


S 


fa 3 


Pd 


h4 


»J 


o 


fa 


H 



O 


CM 


CO 


ON 


<f 


CM 


r» 


00 


CM 


o- 


ON 


NO 


-d- 


NO 


m 


«ct 


NO 


I-l 


<!■ 


CO 










m 


ON 


m 


ON 


<!• 


NO 


o 


o 


ON 


I-l 


CM 


ON 










r^ 


CO 


m 


m 


■CO- 


CM 


CM 









CU 












CO 






co 






•r-l 


CO 




CU 






o 


cu 




X 






X 


X 




CO 






w 


CO 
H 


CO 


H 






CU 




4-1 


CU 




CO 


1-1 


T>N 


c 


CO 




CU 


y 


4-1 


CU 


•r-l 




X 


•H 


u 


B 







CO 


SI 


CU 


CO 


X 


r*. 


H 


CU 


a 


CO 


w 


r^ 




> 


o 


CU 




^-^ 


CU 




u 


CO 


1-1 


NO 


4-1 


u 


fa 


CO 


co 


r^ 


at 







< 


e 




4-1 


4J 


■-I 




•H 


fa 


CO 





CO 


r-l 


C 


O 


fa 


S 


c 
o 


CO 

•H 


<c 


>- 


I-l 


NO 


CO 


o 


e 


> 


CO 


r^ 


u 


CU 


w 


CU 


ON 


cu 


fa 


CO 


(J 


fa 


1-1 


fa 


CO 


fa 



CO 
























•H 


CO 










CO 












O 


cu 










cu 




m 






NO 


X 


X 










X 




r^ 






r~ 


fa 


(d 








cu 


a 




I 






i 




H 


CO 






CO 


H co 




T-l 




NO 


o 


CU 


CU 


4J 






•I-l 


4J 




CO 




r-. 


CO 


CO r-l 


>N CO 


C 




CO 


o 


>N C 




1 




On 


i 


cu y 


4-1 -H 


cu 




CU 


X 


4-1 CU 




CM 




i-i 


CM 


X •<-> 


tj y 


£ 




X 


w 


t-i e 




i-l 






i-l 


« j= 


cu X 


co 




CO 




cu co 












H cu 


D, W 


CO 




H 


cu 


Pi CO 






NO 


CO 




> 





CU 






r-l 


o cu 




CU 


1^ 


4-1 


CU 


CU 


lJ r-l 


CO 


CO 


CU 


U 


t-i CO 




u 


CJ\ 


C 


y 


4J U 


fa a) 


CO 


fa 


4-1 


•H 


fa CO 




a 


i-l 


CU 


C 


(0 O 


e 


< 


a 


CO 


J3 


< 


fa 


CO 




e 


co 


4-1 4-1 


t-l -H 




4-1 


<D 


I-l 


pj 


r-i 


CO 


cu 


r-l 


CO O 


CO C 


I-l 


>-i 


CO 


> 


CO i-l 


2 


<0 


H 


CO 


CO 


w S 


c < 


CO 




fa 




C CO 


5 


fa 


fa 


u 


fa 




o 


•H 


fa 




t-i 


O -r-l 


w 




M 


3 




i-i m 


s a 


y 


o 


1-1 


o 


co y 


< 


4= 


W 


tO 


J2 


(0 I s * 


cu 


M 


CO 


4-1 


I-l cu 




CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CU On 


cu co 


fa 


fa 


cu 


o 


CU fa 


s 


(0 


fa 


•H 


00 


fa r-l 


fa fa 


CO 


fa 


fa 


£ 


fa CO 


H 


u 


fa 


Q 


u 



20 



o 
o 
CN 

CO 

oo 

lO 

0* 

o 


CO 

d 


Sh 

3 

•H 

a 

d 

-O 


P 

a 
o 

•H 

s • 

•H iH 

t> 

O OS 

O H 
!> 

.. 0) 

co o 

CO 3 
iH -H 
« CO 
00 

CO o 
CN O 
#3- CO 

«H Oi 

OrH 

CO 

0) .. 

3 t- 

r-t CO 

d03- 
> 

<H 

T3 O 


CO (1) 

CO CO 

el 

CQ 0) 

CO Sh 

el O 

a 

-H 
P 

el rH 
■P el 
CO +» 
CD O 
P 
iH 

el el 


Sh "O 
3 

-d 
CO 

O •> 

05 Sh 

rH d 



•■> >> 

iH 
CO 

>» 3 
h O 

d -h 

3 > 

a 

el Sh 

*-i P. 





.3 .3 
H P 

Sh 


> 
o 



o 



CO 
el 

U 
O 
3 
•H 

3 CO 
el u 

a 

•> a) 
lO >> 
CN 
O 

«> 
iH -H 

m «h 
<* 
-p 

O CO 

rH d 

03- ft 



O T3 
Sh 

ftW 
CN 

iH CO 

d - 
s <tf 
O CN 
CO rH 
U - 
CN 

a 03- 

«W 
■H O 

42 

a 

X CO 
el el 

p 

U 

H O 

iH 3 

d -h 



d d 
> 

T3 3 

d 
CO 

CO in 

d 

CO 

CO >. 

d 

CO 

~3 

CO o 



H 
> > 

^ 

- ft 




>>J3 

Jh P 



iH 
43 O 
E-l CO 

CO 
O 
CO 
03- 



^inoioo 


m <?> 


moo 


t> CN O CN O 


co oo 


m co o 


t> O l> l> • 


• CN 


• • • 


- - - «>CO 


m •> 


CO CN O 


oo iH co i> m 


CN CO 


r-i co m 


m co oo 


iH 


CD CO CN 


^ Hin 


•* 


•*•*•» 


» •» •. 


05 


cn oo m 


o oo oo 




in in 


rH CO Tf 






N CN 






0> 03- 03- 03- 




03-03-03- 



O "tf O Tt* o 
tP CN O CN O 

t> i> in cn • 



CO 


CO 


•>•>.. «,H 


d 43 


t* 


oo ■* co oo m 


=S -P 


o> 


^mffl 




rH 


rH in CO 


>> bJD 


I 


«. * •> 


P 3 


>H 


o o o 


Sh -H 


pH 


rH CO <* 


U 




CN CN 


ft 3 




03-03-03-03- 



in m 
■* CN 

• rH 

<o « 
in 

co 



>> 




s 




p 







73 


T3 U 




•H 










-p 


CO 


CO ft 




d 


CQ 


CO 




3 


X3 


U 




rH 


CO 


CO ft P 




d 


CO CO 


CO d 




> 


CO < 


<! rH P 









d co 




O 


CO CO 


CO G W 




O 


CO be 


P o 




O 


< c 


C CO rH 




•» 


•H 


3 Sh d 


G rH 


CO rH 


O 


O03- 


rH 


O ft K 


•H 




Sh 





p 


Sh 


O =S 


< 1 1 


d 





< Q 




3 ft 




<H C C H 




«H «H 


O 


d 





o 


•H -H 


> -p 




Sh P P 




d 


u u 


d d rH « 





X! 3 3 


d 




,Q ^2 


S rH rH P 


X 


S S 


3 d d 


o 


d 


3 3 


£ > > H H 


S5 » 



co o o 

rH O O 
00 Tf O 

co in in 
in o cn 

o t- m 
m m 



€0-«r>«» 



t* o o o o 


in 


■^ 


o o o 


rH O O O O 


CO 


O) 


00 CN o 


CO ^ rH in • 


• 


00 


• • • 


.. ^ ^ ^CO 


in 


•» 


CN 00 O 


00 CO l> CO -* 


rH 


in 


>• rH in 


CN rH T}< 


rH 




""S< ^ 00 


co m oo 


•« 




«> •. ~ 


•t •* «v 


oo 




Cl CN CO 


co o oo 


rH 




-* CO 


o o 








CN CN 








&- 03-03- &- 






03-03-03- 



•— \ 


CO 




>> a 




r-i 


d 


s~\ 


u 


Sh 


■a 








c 


T3 


P 


•H 


rH 





l-H 


W > PQ 


^^ 


*w^ 


*~ <• 


rH 


CN 


r^ 


^ CN CO 











CO 


CO 


CO 


3 


3 


3 


cd 


d 


d 


rH 


H 


r-H 


o a o 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

C^COCNOOrHOOO^OCNCO 
rHCOC0t>rHTj<C0O05C000 

oocNcoincooiinooocoi> 
ooincorH^incNcocoooi 



oo 

CN 



CN 



CN 00 Tf 



f/\ r*\ m cf\ fj\ rr\ rf\ er\ i*/\ i*a f/\ 

w w TTT TTT w w TTT *TT w w v7 



OOOOOOOOOOO 

ooooooooooo 
t>t^ooiHcoooo^r>i>co 

rHCNrHCNin'^COOCOOOO 
OOCOrHOrHOlinOiHCNt^ 

oomm oincNcoincocji 



OS 
CN 



CN 



HMTf 



r/\ rf\ ?r\ rr\ r*^' rf\ i*^ j*^\ eg <*^ ^a 
\7v V/J w w vJ VJ V/J vJ \JJ 77 w 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

t^I>O5rHCO00O5^t^COO5 

rHCN-^CNincNOlOCOOO 
MCOCOI>005inOrH'>^0 

oomoo inmcNcomoico 



CN 



CM 



rH in CN 



! */•*. ?/> m jl£\ rf\ eg i - /*\ f/\ r»^\ <»^n ^^\ 

X7T 77 1ST Vl/ W tTV 77 \77 XTT w w 



O) 



03- 



03- 



05 
CN 
CD 

CO 



03- 



. CO 

l> 



CO CO CO 










CO 3 3 










d CO O 










S 3 -r\-<-i 










O P P 











«h -h d d 






O 




O P N N 






•H 




CO d -ri -H 






> 




J3 N C 3 






Sh 




p P -h d d ft 











d rH a bjo be -h 






W 




P d d Sh Sh XI 






>> 


P 


W bOO O CO 






P O 


ft 


£ Sh Sh 






•H -H 


s 


T3 C O P O 






Jh rH P 


p g 


O HC^ 






O X2 O 


&£ 


P g >>X5 






■C 3'H 
P ft Sh 


s w 


•H g Sh d rH (0 






,« 


3 O d P O 3 






3 P 


SJ3 


P O Sh -H > O 






< d w 


w£ 


U -H 






•H 


3 


P d 3 bC 






bo o Q 


» 2 


43 J3 -H 43 -H 






3 P 


9 


P P |J O Dh rH 






•H d 


Sh " 









CO P 


oo 


<H <H =H <H «H Cti 






3 3^ 


<< 


O O o o 


CO 


CO 


O ft O 




«H 





St 


tH *j 


>i >» >» >> >i o 


ho 


•H 


>> >> 


° 


+J +J +J +J +J 


d 


Sh 


Sh P P 




Jh U Jh Sh Sh CO 


3 





Sh Sh 


Sh ** 





O 


■P 


> 


S 


ft ft ft ft ft CO 


CO 





O ft ft 


rQ-9 


O O O O 3 


U 


S T3 O O 


s fi 


Jh Sh Sh Sh Sh O 


a 





3 Sh Sh 


3 ^ 


ftftftftftlXiftuolftft 


^^ 



21 



t> 

05 

rH 

I 

> 

fa 



■h o o ■<* o 

00 O C5 O O 
00 ... . 

»o m r> co 
t* t> i* t> co 

rH Oi 00 CO 

•<t oo r> 

rH t> t> 

t> o 

t> rH 
rH 



fOlO 
00 O 05 

o o o 

CN O CN 

o m co 

CN r> t> 

TP CO CO 

O rH 

CN 

#3- #3-^3- 



CN 

rH 

00 
rH 

00 
CO 



CN 
CN 



cn o i o ih m 

o> ■<* i o co t^ 

00 CN I CN 00 rH 

t* CO I CO CO 00 

00® I t CN O 

.. .. | * ~ 

05 05 I rH CO 

CO O I 

CO rH I 






CO 

r> 

05 



fa 



05 





rH O t> CN 


o 












^ O O CO 


o 












r> . . . 


. 


o o 


O 


O O 


O 




-0 CO rH CD 


o o 


O 


o o 


O 




00 rH rH in CO 


. . 


• 


. . 


• 




rH 05 CO CO 




o o 


o 


o m 


in 




•k VI «. 




o o 


o 


O CN 


CN 




O O CN 




t> rH 


co 


•* o 


CO 




cd oo r> 










•> 




t> o 




CD t> 


05 


CO rH 


<ct< 




"K •>, 




CO rH 


rH 


cn m 


CM 




00 rH 




rH m 


co 


CO •f 


rH 




rH 










•» 




&■&■<&■<& 


00 O 


r> 


00 o 


CN 








co o 


CO 


rH 










CN CN 














#3- #3- 


#3- 


#3-<*3- 


V* 




r$ O t* CO 


o 












00 O CO CO 


o 












rH « • • 


. 












-rH rH t> CO 






>> >> 






10 rH 00 CN CO 






P P 






rH 05 00 00 








U U 






#» #> * 















co co tp 








p< a 






m oo oo 








o 






m i> 









in U 






•> 




P P 




Ph Ph 






CN 




cd cd 










rH 




P P 





rH rH 







m-m-<&& 


CO CO 


in 


cd cd 


CO 








fa fa 


cd 



a a 

O 


cd 









rH rH 


u 


CO CO 


U 








cd cd 


o 


u u 


o 











a 





s 










n 


Ph Ph 
1 1 


►H 
























3 3 




3 3 










rH rH 




rH rH 




w 






cd cd 




cd cd 




CQ 






> > 




> > 




rH 














u 






-O T3 




-O T3 




X 




c 












w 




o 


CO CO 




CO CO 






•v 


•H 


CO CO 




CO CO 




P3 


CD 


p 












w 


CO 


cd 


CO CO 




CO CO 




J 


(0 


3 


CO CO 




CO CO 




hH 





rH 


< < 




< < 




< 


(0 


cct 










ets 


CO 


> 


r> 




t> 




H 


<fl 


o 


05 




C5 




Q 


CO c 


o 


rH rH 




rH rH 




iz; 





o 


1 l> 




1 t>- 




< 


rH -H 


•* 


>• 05 




J* 05 






4-> 


rH 


fa rH 




fa rH 




CO 


•H cd 


*A- 










w 


-fl 3 












fa 


rH 


!h 










o 


> cd 













M 


> (0 


A 










X 


<H P 












w 


"O c 













> 




»H CO S 


P 
cd 










P3 


CO to OS 










o 


,n -h p 












H 


S co y cs 


X 










o 


3 CO X ,Q 


a 










S 


!z;< W <c h 











o m o 

rP CN CO 

CN rH C5 
00 05 05 
t* O l> 

o o r> 
r> m co 
m co 

t> rH 

rH 



rH m o 

00 05 O 

CN 05 O 

00 rH O 

oo o o 
05 m co 

CN 05 CN 
t> 00 

in 

rH 
#3-#3-#3- 



a 

•H 
bDP 

a 

•H 
P S 



C 

S £ 

o 

S3 Eh 
OrH 

Eh cd 
rH S3 

cd S3 

3 <u 

S3 

S3 P 
< cd 



CO Sh 

bC cd 

S3 

•H >> 

p 

CO 

3 

s o 

•H 

S3 > 

& 

O h 

H P. 







a 

OQ 

P 
cd 



P CO w 

Cd T3 "O 

S3 S3 

•O 3 3 

«H «H 



^ rH rH 

A cd cd 

Cd rH rH 



Kl 


co cd cd 


1ZJ 


S3 > > 


O 


cd ed 


>-H 


•H 


H 


P S S 


<C 


cd O O 


HH 


•H t, Jh 


P3 


Sh tH «H 


ft 


Ph 


O 


O "O T3 


« 


Sh 


Ph 


P-P P 


Ph 


P. 


< 


<>> 



m 

CN 

CO 

t> 

CO 
00 

m 

05 

oo 

rH 



CO 

I> 

CN 

o 

05 

o 
in 
co 

CD 
rH 
#3- 



Q 

fa 

<J 
hH 

PS 
Ph 
O 

Ph 
Ph 
< 

55 

O 

fa 
< 

O 

Eh 



K! 



O 00 

co o 

rH m 
cNm 

05 



i o 

I rH 
I • 
I rH 



CN O 
CO CN 
CD rH 



in 

CN 



O CD 

in tjh 

co t* 

co t> 

co m 



I 05 

i m 
i > 

I CN 
I rH 

I CO 



«* CO I 
CO CN I 
CO rH I 



CO 



t^ o 

CN 00 
CO l> 

co ■* 

CO CO 
CN 



w7 vJ \JJ VT \tJ 



m o 
co CN 

CN 05 

o o 

CO 






s 








cd 




Sh 


Sh 




•H 


bfi 




P 


O 







Sh 




SS Ph 




rH 






cd 






p 






£3 











e 


s 







S3 




p 


u 




CO 







>> > 




CO w 







p 


o 




S3 P 






3 S3 


>> 




rH 




u s 


Sh 




O 







< wo 




•H 


rH 




rH P fa 




cd 




CO 


CO PhP3 





rH 


ed -h 


P 


rH 


O «H 


cd 


•H 


rl'ri O 


P 


fa 


«fl S3 


CO 




3 S3 


1 


X 


S3 S 





cd 


O -H 


V 


Eh 


■H SH P 


c 




p cd 


cs 





cd S3 


u 


rH 


P -H 


3 


O 


X U -H s 


CO 


•H 


cd o "O cd 


a 


-C 


Eh 3 X 


h- 1 





CS < fa 




> 


>> 


x: 




P 


p 


Sh 


C 4^ +j +j 


rH 





3 cd cd cd 


cd 


P 


+j +j -p 








O W GO CO 33 


S 



22 



t> 



Ph 



CM 


COOIOOO 

m o o r- 


CO 

o 


l> 

CM 


CO 


• 


• • • • 


• 


• 


• 


CO 
CO 
CO 


1 CM 00 O Oi 
1 •«* CM CO CO 

i co co m co 


t> 

o 


CO 
CO 


rH 


^ 


*•«•*•* 


■t 


•* 




CO 


i-l CM I> rH 

CM CO 


rH 

in 

00 


co 

rH 

1 


o 






w- te- ^ 



CO 
00 


t> t^ o 
o t- o 


CM 

CO 


rH 


CO 


• 


* • • 


• 


• 


« 


rH 
Oi 

en 


I oo m o i 

1 Otffl 1 

i m ^< o> i 


in 

rH 
CM 


CO 

m 


in 

o 


•. 


•*•*•* 


•t 


•» 


•* 


CO 


CM CM CO 
CM CO 


CM 
CM 

00 


o 

CO 


CM 
Ci 






COOOOOOOOOO 
CMOOOOOOOOO 


o o o o o 
o o o o o 


o 
o 

o 
o 
m 

o 

CM 

co 


CM 
C5 


COOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooo 

COOOOOOOOOO 


O O O O O 1 
O O O O O 1 

i o o o o m i 


05 
00 


COOOOlOCMincOCMOO 
CD in CM iH iH CO 
rH X 


i m o co o 

rio m 

O rH 


co 

CO 



&■ &- &■ 



co 

**\ *r\ pf\ rf\ rf\ cf\ rf\ ***> ***• rA *^ rr\ rr\ rr\ rf\ ?i\ 

W w w w v7 w w^r W 7T wir wr v? w w \TT rr? 



ooooooooooooooooo 
^ooooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I 
CMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I 

■^oooooooooomooom i 
comocomomcoiHmiHt>o^rm 

Ci O CM rH rH CO rH CM 

C55 CO CO iH 

CM 

xty- tt? w ixr */t- -t/y- trr trr trr t^r try try W xrr t/y - vr 



** <» 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 

m 

CO 

m 



o 

CO 



CM 



CM 
CO 
CO 



m- m- 





CO 


O CO O CO 


rH 


m 


CO 




rt< 


en en o co 


"* 


00 


m 


m 


• 


• • • • 


• 




• 


t> 


CO 


1 CO Oi o ■* 


co 


co 


en 


OS 


05 


i co o o m 


CO 


o 


CM 


rH 


l> 


i en m o m 


CM 


rH 


rH 


1 




»* *v «s »s 


* 


•* 


» 


>- 




m iH ^ CM 


o 


CM 


co 


Ph 




ih m co 


o 
en 


rH 


00 
00 



w XrT \Jj TTT w 



CMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
■HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

CMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I 
COOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I 

oooooooomocMoomom i 



m- m- & 



comocMinoom 

T* t> CM rH rH CO 

in co 

CM 

pf\ ?f\ pf\ ££\. £j\. rf\ *^\ pf\ pr\ ff\ < T\ ED IT\ f ,f\ ***** *r\ 

w tyy ttj- -ov" rrr w w ijj ttt trr t/y w w ixr w w 



m o co o 
o m 

CO 



o 
o 

o 
o 

o 

CM 



o 
in 

co 
co 

CO 

■<* 

CO 
CO 



«fi- #3- 

































■a 




*2 








































•H 




ft 


























tt 














<! 




«H 









































/^N 




Q 



























G 























CO 






















O 














-P 




Sh 




•H 






• 
















•H 














P> «J 




rH 




CD 






-o 
















CO 














P -P 




■P ciS 




X 






•- 














CO 


CO 














•H CO 




as CO 




Ph 






+- 1 














Q 


•H 














S 




St 










CI 














^ 


g 














B G 




eg 




P> 









tfl 












& 


g 














cO 




CO 




G 






V 


u 

0) 












Ph 


o 
o 










P 




CJ XI 
Eh 




al CO 
T3 






S 






CO 


■P J3 












w 













Sh 




rH 




X G 




ft 






-p 


O O 












J 


>> CO 















O Sh 




3 fc 




•H 






fl 


•H nJ P 












m 


Xi -H 










ft 




O 






G 









>h (DO 












< 


o 










O 




X! XI 




W 




a* 






s 


P Eh -H 




Jh 








J 


•e X! 










Sh 




O P> 




^--P 




Ph 






tfl 


CO X Sh 




rt 




tl 




M 


H 










ft 




CO O 




Cfl 










en 


•H CS r-i -P 









aj 




< 


•H 


















co G 




T3 






Q) 


P H Rj W 




>> 









> 


•«H Jh 










TJ 




<H CO 




Sh 




G >» 






tfl 


a-ri 








>> 




< 


•H 










G 




O -P 




Cfl Eh 




aS P> 


CO 




tfl 


-U >>-H Q 




02 










P iH 










a) 




ft 




•H 




•H 


Eh 




<: 


CD +J O 

£ B'HH 




G 





CO 

3 




a 


Sh -H 
aS 










CO 


G 


CO -H 
■P 




Sh G 
ft al 




>» Sh 
Sh O 


ft 

M 




X 


tfl 3 c 




•H 









^ 


O Fh 










G 


O 


ft o 




Sh X 




X 


Ph 




rt 


Fh O 3 *n 




> 




•H 






Eh 






tfl 




O 


■H 


•rt 




Eh 




G P 


tj 




Eh 


o S -P 









> 




co 


tfl 






P 


p 


CO -P 


W 




-P 




•H G 


P4 






■P c 


G 


u 









Eh 


■P -o 






G 


G 


Sh 


«J 


O 




G Sh 




X < 


« 




i>> 


CO 1 CD 





ft 




u 




ft 


ft G 















P 


rH 




Ph 




CD 






-P 


& OO 


•H 






ft 




M 


•H rt 






S 


S ft 


•H 


PS CO 




X 




aS bfl 


P 




c 


to a 


p 


tfl 








w 









tfl 


G 




G 


o 




P 




S G 


Ph 




3 


u Q> a c 


rt 







tfl 




c_> 


O 






tfl 


U 


SH 


a 


cci J 




o o 




•H 


Eh 




o 


P Sh 


O 


•p 









w 


rH 












O CO 




•H w 




* CO 






o 


> rt 3 -H 


G 


a 




p 




« 


Pi o 






tfl 


> 






O w 




> 




H G 


g 






•H S tfl P "O 


6 




cd 






•H 






Cfl 


o 


G 


T3 


J CC 


c 


Sh CO 




«S O 


M 


X 


T3 


p- -h a 3 w 


•H 




e 


J 


Q 


T3 J3 






< O 


O 


G 


o 







£ K 


Eh 


< 


G 


+J M r-i 




-P 




•H 


o 


w 





tfl 








•H 


R) 


CO ^ 


•H 


CO -H 


P 


•H 


W 


Eh 


rt 


XI tfl iH 


(H 


(0 




P 


H 


Eh 


-P > 







rH 


rH 


p 




>> -H 


P 


Sh 


CO 


G Sh 


W 






O CD J3 


a 







CO 


o 


^ 


CO 


tfl 




a 


a 


O 


XI 


d rH Sh 


CIS 


O 


<: 




>H 


CD 


■H (H-Pft 


•H 


Sh 


J 





Eh 


s 


S Sh 


G 


tfl 


•H 


H 


-P 


£ O «J 





•H -P 


Sh 


> 


J 




4-> 


& CD iH 


CD 





< 


Fh 




M 


■H O 














•p 


rH 


X O Sh 


Sh rH 





s o 


o 


^ 


rt 


ffl-O B) h 


73 


Eh 





Eh 


Eh 


P P 


O 


G 





G 


O 


a 


bflXi X) 


Xi S 


P 


Sh T3 


H 


P3 


-P 


ft G -H 


a, c 


o 


> 


g 


CO 


CO 


•H 


•H 


ft 





& 





•H O -H 





G 
ft (J 


G 


ai G 


o 


o 


CO 


HDS<Wt) 


Eh 


o 


W 


w s j Pm co a 


ffiKMdK 


HH 


Ph «SJ 


Eh 


o 



23 





0)00000 


IN 


CO 




m to o o o 


CM 


"* 




• * • • 1 


• 


• 




N01OOO 


IN 


05 


N 


CO o o o o 


"<* 


TP 


l> 


t> cm © o © 


G5 


H 


en 


~ •* «s *s ». 


•t 


•» 


rH 


x x m w w 


co 


in 


1 


G5 rN IN 05 05 


CO 


in 


>H 


CO CO H rH 


CM 


rH 


Eh 


Wk 


w 


•>. 




iH 


CM 


CO 
(H 




0*\ £^±£A. ff\ *** 

W W \TT V7 W 


05- 


«* 




in o o o o 


m 


CM 




NtDOOO 


00 


"* 




• • • • * 


• 


• 


CD 


iH 0) o o o 


o 


05 


N 


00 0) o o o 


X 


o 


(J) 


in n o o o 


CO 


to 


r-i 


•t •* •* * •* 


•* 


■t 


| 


oomw 


X 


in 


tH 


mno^^ 


l> 


in 


Eh 


iH CM-CM CM 


X 


CM 



CM 



**\ *n r*i ff\ ff\ **> ff\ 

wwww w w w 





m o o o o 


m 


o 




SIOOOO 


a 


IN 


m 


SIOOOO 


05 


CO 


i> 


rH o o o o 


iH 


00 


05 


o o o o o 


o 


l> 


iH 


»t •» «t •» •* 


■» 




| 


m to o o o 


rH 


o* 


>H 


OINWOO 


IN 


00 


&H 


00 X CM CM 


to 


CM 



CM 



mA *rs i»^\ p f\ »**> **\ <**n 

w w V; w 77 w VJT 



o o 
o o 


o 
o 


• • 


• 


m o 
M o 
o t> 


in 
cm 
in 


^ * 


•» 


rH tO 

m co 

Tt< rH 


in 

00 

in 


•>. * 


•« 


O 00 

rH CO 

CM 


00 
M 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


• • 


• 


Tj* O 

CM O 

r> m 


cm 

M 


•s. « 


m 


<tf CO 

Tt* m 
ih in 


00 
05 

to 


•s * 


•k 


O O 

rH CO 
CM 


o 

CM 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


• • 


• 


o o 
o o 

00 r-i 


o 
o 

05 


*• •* 


•> 


r-i rH 
05 CM 

to o 


CM 

rH 


•* *k 


*» 


05 ca 

cm 

CM 


rH 
CO 
CM 



rH 05 
O 05 

O CSI 

CO CM 



o 
o 



CO 

in 



&ym- & 



o o 
m m 



05 iH 
CM CM 



o 
o 



rH 

m 



#*«r> 


W- 


CO 1> 

O 05 


o 
o 


• • 


• 


O CSI 

CO CM 


CO 

m 



#3-«/3- &■ 



CO o 


CO 


CO H 


■«* 


• • 


• 


-* m 


C5 


O Tf 


Tf 


05 CM 


rH 


•v •>* 


M 


CO H 


m 


m cm 


i> 


in to 


rH 


•» 


•N 


CM 


CO 


rH 


r-i 


<&<& 


«r> 


IN o 


t> 


05 m 


"<* 


• • 


• 


o oo 


05 


oo co 


O 


CO CM 


to 


•s •» 


•» 


in oo 


m 


iH in 


t> 


m t> 


M 


rH 


CM 


iH 


rH 


&&>■ 


«r> 


o o 


o 


"tf CO 


r> 


• • 


• 


in oo 


CO 


tO rH 


oo 


tO iH 


in 


•* •* 


m, 


CO 1> 


o 


iH tO 


X 


m in 


CM 



<&■<& 



rH 





rH 


4-> 


«J 


C 


-P 


0) 





O Eh 


u 







SH 


a 








H 


+J 


rt 


c 


+> 








fH 


h 




1) «H 


a, 






05 m to 

r-i r> 



o o o 

o o o 

(N tO 05 

tO 05 O 

tO m rH 

tt m ih 

O CO rH 

co co x 

rH 



Sh 









X! 


t> o 


s 


to r> n 


3 


rH x m 


a 





X 



rH rH t> 



O 
O 



O 

O 

r> 

to 

CO 



X 
CO 
CM 



l> 
t> 

X 



Be 

o 
o 



< 
w 

CO 

o 

H 

Q 

W 

•H 

O 

> 

i 








+J 




ed 




« 




u X 




a a 




Eh 




>H 




+j 




CO c 




3 3 -P 




T3 S fl 




•H +■> 




>« u s 




rt +J 




Sh (1 Sh 




CX +-> rt 




P & 




bJD bJ3 bJD 




C C G Q 




•H -H -H CJ 




+> +J +J -H 




rH U 




<H 


X 


S S S ft Eh 


@ 


C G S 
S & ? -P -P 


g 


o o 




Eh H H t»0 bfi 


Eh 


c c 


hh 


h rH ^ -H -H 


X 


rt cti eS Sh in 


< 


rH -H rH rt SJ 


J 


3 O 3 J3 Si 


M 


bjO bJDX X 


< 


O, 


> 


C4 X OS 


<fl 


3 3 




"O "O X! C G 


■J 





< 


+J +J +J > > 


H 


O 


O 


> >>,« PS 


H 



m Eh 



3 

O 

rH -H 

Rl -P 

-P CS 

3 

Eh rH 

> 



>. 


















+J 


















h 





































ft 


















O 


















££ 


















rt 


















rH -P 


















a co 


















G Eh 































Q 






CO rH 












Eh 


>> 




u a 












l— I 


+J 

















> 


u 




ft OS 










Eh 
Eh 


Eh 



ft 




«H <H 











<fl 

















•P 


-p 


OS 


X 

Eh 


Sh 
ft -P 




G G 






a os 


X 


X 


«3 









W 


OS 




< 


< 


rH -P 




•H -H 




H 




rH 


H 


Eh 


03 CO 




■P -P 




< 


rH 


a 






G Eh 




Clt CJ 


HH 


OS 





u 


J 


J 





-J 


3 3 


<! 










< 


< 


CO rH 


< 


rH rH 


Eh 


X 


J3 


G 


H 


Eh 


Sh 03 


Eh 


rt (4 


o 


< 








O 


g 





O 


> > 


H 


Eh 


x a 


Eh 


ft PS 


Eh 








24 











o o o 

o o o 

in m co 

CO rH X 

M to to 

N 05 CO 

m N M 

CM X t* 

rH 



Sh 









-Q 


co co 


s 


1> rH 05 


3 


h r> <* 


fc 





X 



rH rH 03 



cd 


crj 


■H 


•H 


■H 


■P 





Sh 


G 


Sh 


■P 








CO -o 


s 


3 


•H 


S T3 


CO 





G 






o 
o 
m 

x 
m 
m 

o 
x 

CM 
#3- 



O 
IN 

X~ 



OHtf 



< 
Eh 
O 

Eh 



o 
oo 



o 
o 



o 

C5 



o 
o 



o 
o 



o 



o 

CM 




co 


CO 


• 


• 


• 


• 


00 

o 

05 


00 

i> 


05 
rH 


CO 

o 

00 


m. 


•t 


■* 




m 
m 


o 
co 


i> 

rH 


CO 
CM 


m, 


•t 


M 




o 

CM 


l> 


CO 
rH 





&■ m- <& 



T3 

CO 

•ri 

OS 
CD 

ja 

o 

p 

-p 

G 

O 

e 
o 

CO 

(0 

o 
u 
o 



<=/3- 



X2 

d 



> 

< 

co 

-p 
ft 

•H 


o 


OS 



-P 
10 

w 





CO 
•H 

«S 
03 


£! 

O 
-P 

-P 

G 

O 

I 

•P 


iz; 



< 
•J 

OS 

w 
> 
o 















>H 


X 














H 


< 




^ 


CM 


cm 


■* 


i> 


OS 


H 




C5 


m 


■* 


^ 


i> 


H 






• 


• 


• 


• 


\ 


ft 






in 


CO 


C5 


m 


CO 


o 






C5 


00 


O 


oo 


o 


OS 




CO 


t* 


00 


CO 


t> 


05 


ft 




l> 


•* 


•k 


■» 


•* 


r-i 






05 


o 


"tf 


in 


l> 




l-H 


Q 


rH 


m 


o 


c~ 


in 


1 


<! 


W 




o 


Tt< 


CM 


CM 




55 


Kl 




«. 


•* 


*» 




CQ 


O 


CO 




00 


CO 


CM 




OS 


w 


w 




rH 




t-i 






OS 

w 






&■ 


co 
e 


m 


<=«- 


<! 
ft 

X 

< 

Eh 

ft 

o 
Eh 

w 

E-« 


ft 


<C 



CO 


00 


m 


rH 


05 


t> 


r-i 


CO 


<ct< 


l> 


o 


oo 


t- 


Tj< 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


00 


m 


t* 


<* 


oo 


00 


O 


CO 


05 



CO 

l> 

CO 



o 
o 

CD 



CO 
00 
CO 



o 
o 
o 



<* 



o 
o 

CO 



CO 


o 


t» 


0* 


oo 


■<* 


05 


CO 


co 


CO 


o 


o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

05 



o 
o 



o 
o 
l> 



CM 


t> CO CO 


t-i 






<fr 








o 


o 




00 


00 




• 


• 




m 


-* 




i> 


o 




<* 


CM 




•« 






o 


CM 




CO 






CM 






#3- 






O 


O 




O 


O 




CO 


CD 




•» 


•* 




00 


rH 




"tf 


<tf 




CO 






•k 






■* 






m- 





CM 



CM 



O 
O 
05 



O 
O 



■* 


CO 


O 


t> 


■* 


o 


00 


CO 


05 


r-i 


CO 


05 


o 


CO 


o 


CM 


tp 


l> 


l> 


CM 




o 


o 


CO 


m 


o 


05 



CM 



o 


o 


o 


o 


05 


CO 


• 


• 


■ 


r-i 


CO 


05 


t> 


in 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 




CM 


in 
o 

iH 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


rH 


^ 


Vk 




t> 


co 


00 




Tt< 


00 
05 
























o 




















c 




















o 



























+-> 








+J 


p 




Xi 




• 


CO 








CQ 


CO 




-P 




o 


3 








3 


3 




>> 




o 


IH 








fH 


u 




a 






Eh 








Eh 


Eh 




OS 




o 

•H 


bD 








>><~. 


>» 




c3 




u 


fl 








■P X! 


H-> 


>> 






p> 


•H 






CO 


r-i -P 


rH 


G 


CO 




o 


T3 









rt -h 


a 


OS 










rH 






•H 


S 





ft 


•p 


>> 


r-t 


•H 


>» 




p> 


OS CO 


OS 


B 


rt 


G 


H 


3 


a 


6 


h 






O 


•H 


a 




CQ 





«S 





fH >> 





o 


o 


ft 


CO 




•o 


JS 


ft 


cc! 


> 




o 


s 


+-> 





cd 


X 


o 


> & 


•H 


CO 


CO 


o 


P> 





O 


o 


u 


O X 


fH 


Ri 


CO 


u 





U 


< 





ft 


TJ O 


Q 


o 


< 




CO 


X! 




o 




C 











3 


Eh 


CO 


1 


T3 


<: u 


rH 





x 


p 


J3 


1 


ft 


>> 


c 


1 CQ 


cd 


o 


o 


p 


O 


>> 


•H 





a 


o ^ 


•H 


G 


o 





a 


+J 


r-i 


CO 


r-{ 


(50 


G 





u 


rH 


Ul 





r-i 


CO 


+-> 


BJ 


O 


fH 


T3 


r-H 


CO 


C 


•H 








xj 


rH 


£ 


g 


•H 


cct 


•H 


J3 


fH 


X! 





o 


a 


w 


O 


S 


i5 


ft 


o 


«3 


CO 


CJ 


hJ 



25 



CETA Program 



In the past twelve months, 50 individuals have found positions in Andover 
under the C.E.T.A. program. Twenty of these individuals were hired under $51,424 
of Federal funds allocated to the Town on January 2, 1976. The balance of the 
C.E.T.A. participants were hired under a second allocation of $89,000 which was 
granted to the Town on April 30, 1976. Nearly 90% of the employees hired are 
Andover residents. 

The employment level as of January 1, 1977 under C.E.T.A. stood at 37. Since 
the State Office of Manpower Affairs has mandated that employment under this pro- 
gram cannot exceed a maximum of twelve months, most of the present employees will 
be separated from their positions by June of 1977. 

The termination of present employees will not mean a termination of the 
C.E.T.A. program itself. New funds received in February have allowed the creation 
of new C.E.T.A. positions which will continue through FY 77. 

During the past year, a total of seven Town departments and nonprofit agencies 
asked for and received C.E.T.A. personnel to carry out useful and necessary func- 
tions which are reflected in decreased operating expenses to the Town. The assign- 
ment of C.E.T.A. personnel to these departments and agencies in Andover was as 
follows: 



Department 



Personnel 



Function 



Andover Housing 
Authority 

Andover Housing 
Authority 



1 Clerk Typist 



2 Painters 



Clerical 



Assisted in the redecorating 
of 25 veterans' apartments, 
4 elderly apartments and the 
repainting of 75% of the 
clothesline fence enclosures 
in the housing complexes. 



Library 

March of Dimes 



1 Clerk Typist 

1 Administrative Asst, 



Clerical 

Administrative and clerical 
duties 



March of Dimes 



1 Driver/Custodian 



Light maintenance, custodial 
and driving duties 



D.P.W. 
D.P.W. 

D.P.W. 



1 Water Meter Reader 
13 Laborers 

4 Painters 



Meter readings 

Drainage projects, sewer 
maintenance, snow removal, etc. 

Cleaned and painted all Pub- 
lic Works buildings, refur- 
bished and reshingled the 
Park building, painted 2 
buildings at Buxton Court, 
renovated the Highway office 
and painted guardrails on 
several roads. 



D.P.W. 



1 Project Supervisor 



Coordinated work projects. 



26 



Recreation 



1 Groundskeeper 



Red Cross 
Town Manager 



Town Manager 



School 



School 



School 



1 Driver/Custodian 



2 Painters 



1 Program Supervisor 



5 Painters 



15 Custodians and 

Maintenance Laborers 



3 Secretaries and 
Clerk Typists 



Maintenance of grounds and 
buildings in Recreation Park, 
Ballardvale Community Center, 
school ball fields, and the 
West Andover Community Center. 

Light maintenance, custodial 
and driving duties 

Interior and exterior of West 
Andover Fire Station, interior 
of Memorial Hall and Ballard- 
vale Libraries and balance of 
interior of the Town Hall. 

Supervised operations of 
C.E.T.A. program in Andover 

Interior and exterior of 
Doherty School, interior and 
exterior of West Junior High 
School, exterior doors and 
trim at East Junior High 
School and designated class- 
rooms at Andover Senior High 
School. 

Performed general maintenance 
and custodial duties under 
senior custodians including 
outside work on school grounds 
and play areas. 

Secretarial and clerical 
duties 



Town Counsel 



On December 31, 1976 there were 39 cases pending. 

During the year 1976, 15 cases were successfully terminated for the Town. 

Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and Administrative 
Boards. 

Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town Officials on 47 
occasions. 

Town Counsel rendered in excess of 60 informal opinions, and had conferences 
with the Town Manager and with Town officials on an almost daily basis. Telephone 
conferences with various Town officials, which often resulted in the rendering of 
oral legal opinions, occurred on approximately 235 occasions. 

Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town 
Meetings. 

During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed, 
and numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted, reviewed and 
recorded. 



27 



Fire Department 



The Fire Department is established and maintained by the municipality to 
provide protection to the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, 
explosion or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of 
this work, the firefighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the j ; 
highest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
concerning his work if he is to perform his duties efficiently and with minimum 
risk to himself and to his fellow firefighters. He should have detailed knowledge 
of the dangers arising from heat, smoke, explosion, etc., caused by fire; of the 
hazards presented by new industries, processes and materials developed by science; 
of the construction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used 
or stored in them; and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high 
pressures. 

Objectives of fire protection are to prevent fire from starting, to prevent 
loss of life and property in case fire starts, to confine fire to the place of 
origin and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and 
dramatic action, has far greater appeal for people than have fire prevention 
measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions and administrative "interference" 
with what are termed "individual rights". 

The Fire Department installs, repairs and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
comprising some three million feet of wiring, both aerial and underground, and 
associated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system. The 
Department operates from three stations — the Public Safety Center and the Ballard- 
vale and West Substations. Its fifty-eight men use seven pieces of firefighting 
equipment. 

During 1976, the Town of Andover took two major steps towards meeting the 
requirements of General Law Chapter 111C, pertaining to ambulances. The first 
step was the acquisition of a new ambulance that meets the requirements of this 
law and secondly training of the necessary Emergency Medical Technicians to man 
the ambulance. At the present time there are ten members of the Andover Fire 
Department who are registered E.M.T.S. During the same period fifty-six members 
were trained in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation by two members who are C.P.R. 
Instructors. This type of training will continue until all the members of the 
department are sufficiently trained to meet all the requirements of all the new 
state laws under the Department of Public Health, which must be met by July 1, 1977.. 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals and inns, as required by 
State statutes, were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper 
authorities. Public and private school fire drills and inspections required by 
law were conducted. Mercantile, industrial, church, garage and service stations 
were inspected and reports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to owners/ 
occupants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In-service inspections 
were conducted from all stations using radio-controlled fire trucks and a full 
complement of firefighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid storage and 
all such associated equipment were issued. Blasting permits and Model Rocketry 
permits were also issued in accordance with State laws. 

As in past years, the major causes of fire were carelessness, the misuse of 
smoking materials, children and matches and faulty electrical appliances and wiring. 



28 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Service Calls 

Fires 

False Alarms 

Mutual Aid Calls 

Approx. Value of Bldgs. 
Where Fire Occurred 

Approx. Loss from Fires $ 

Ambulance Calls 

Non-Residents Billed 
for Ambulance Service 

Fuel Oil Heat Install- 
ation Permits Issued 

Explosive Use Permits 

Building Inspections 

Fire Drills Conducted 

Fatalities from Fire 

Flammable Liquid and Ex- 
plosive Permits Issued 

Cutting/Welding Permits 

Fireworks Permits 

Rocketry Permits 

Abandon Underground Tank 
Permits Issued 

Fire Alarm Permits 



1976 


1974-1975 


1973-1974 


(12-Month Period) 


(18-Month Period) 


(18-Month Period) 


2,082 


3,130 


2,942 


682 


916 


745 


89 


101 


79 


12 


27 


8 


$ 2,754,000.00 


$104,030,830.47 


$ 46,280,120.00 


$ 287,305.00 


$ 423,347.43 


285,268.76 


727 


1,003 


846 



216 

101 

13 

475 

103 



11 
2 
1 
5 


121 



293 

137 

12 

1,628 

189 



19 
6 

1 
21 

3 

96 



284 

121 

18 

1,418 

186 

3 

48 

20 

2 

31 

3 





Police Department 



During the year 1976 some s 
the police department. Three of 
another to join his family that 
plete the required course in bas 
ment. Thus at the end of 1976, 
3 Lieutenants, 5 Sergeants and 3 
female, 10 full time and 5 part 
time clerks, female, one full-ti 
— one female, and one part-time 
divided between Andover and Nort 
part-time man paid for by Buildi 



ignificant changes were made 
ficers resigned, one to join 
had moved out of state. The 
ic training within the nine 
the police department consis 
1 Patrolmen. There were als 
time. Also working for the 
me mechanic — maintenance man 
summer maintenance man. Als 
h Andover. Janitorial work 
ng Maintenance and some jani 



in the personnel of 
a Federal Agency, 
other failed to corn- 
months of his appoint- 
ted of 40 men — Chief, 
o 15 Crossing Guards, 
department were 2 full- 
, 4 civilian dispatchers 
o a Legal Advisor 
is performed by one 
torial service is 



29 



performed by the mechanic-maintenance man. Included in the 40 man police force is 
a full-time safety officer and a detective force consisting of a Sergeant in charge 
and 3 Patrolman Investigators. 

At the 1976 April Town Meeting, the townspeople voted to have a survey of the 
police department conducted and until such survey is made, no changes are contem- 
plated as far as personnel for the police department is concerned. 

During the year Lt. Hector Pattullo attended and successfully passed the 
F.B.I. National Academy course held in Quantico, Virginia. He is the second 
officer from the department to do so, the Chief having attended the Academy in 
1958. Other officers are showing interest in attending this Academy which is 
considered to be the best in the world. In fact, one more officer, Sgt. James 
Johnson is scheduled to attend in 1977. Also 4 officers successfully passed their 
basic 12 week training course at the State Police Academy, considered one of the 
best in the country. Most of the officers continue to show an interest in attend- 
ing courses in police work — Drug Abuse Education, Crime Scene Search, Record Keep- 
ing for F.B.I. Reports, Emergency Vehicle Driving School, Skid School, Rape Investi- 
gation Training Seminars (3), Arson Investigation Seminar, Ident-Kit School, Bomg 
Seminar, Explosive and Incendiary School, F.B.I. Firearms Instructors School, 
Personnel Background Investigation Seminar. Also in May the entire department 
receives firearms instruction at Camp Curtis Guild in Wakefield. Eleven officers 
are attending college as are 2 dispatchers, mostly working for associate degrees, 
although 2 are working for bachelor degrees and one for his masters degree. 

Statistically speaking, there were some changes in the figures representing 
the main categories of crime investigated by the police department. The most 
significant drop was in housebreaks . In 1975 there were 331 breaks reported and 
in 1976 there were 261 breaks. We are hopeful that this drop is due to increased 
police surveillance and also the cooperation of the public in reporting any sus- 
picious activities in their area. There was also a drop in stolen cars, 96 in 
1976 as against 140 in 1975. Also 20 less bicycles were reported stolen — 155 as 
against 175 in 1975. Motor vehicle accidents claimed three lives in two separate 
accidents. In 1975, 5 persons were killed in motor vehicle accidents. There were 
37 more reported accidents in 1976 as were reported the year before, 791 against 
754 in 1975. The crime of larceny showed a large increase, 501 in 1976 as against 
384 reported in 1975. 

In 1976 there were 1055 cases prosecuted in court, an increase of 392 over 
1975. Most of the cases were for motor vehicle violations, 770 of which 332 were 
for speeding and 80 for operating under the influence of alcohol. 

The following are some of the more serious crimes prosecuted in court: A & 6 
(13), Possession of Dangerous Weapon (1), B & E (24), Larceny (36), Drugs (3), 
Armed Robbert (1), Receiving Stolen Property (13), Rape (1), Arson (6), Assault 
with intent to murder (1). 

In 1976 there were 7,711 parking tickets issued as against 5,558 in 1975. 

One case of murder was investigated in 1976 and as of the date of this report, 
the case is still unsolved. 

During 1976 the police vehicles traveled 360,024 miles using 41,669 gallons of 
gasoline. The department has 5 marked vehicles, including the Safety Car, one 
detective car and one car which is primarily used for court appearances. There is 
also one Cushman vehicle used for patrolling the main business area. The police 
department also supplies gasoline for the Animal Control truck, Game Wardens, 
maintenance man, Chief's car and individual officers cars when used for Superior 
Court appearances when no police cruisers are available. 

The following chart shows activities for the past five years: 



30 



1972 



1973 



1974 



1975 



1976 



Complaints 


6 


,443 


7 


,210 


6 


,085 


4 


,927 


5 


,886 


Breaking and Entering 




232 




161 




262 




331 




261 


Larceny 




343 




429 




519 




384 




501 


Stolen Cars 




58 




88 




141 




140 




95 


Stolen Bicycles 




97 




121 




197 




175 




155 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 




766 




829 




703 




754 




791 


Motor Vehicle Deaths 




7 




5 




2 




5 




3 


Cruiser Mileage 


339 


,846 


344 


,190 


343 


,083 


333 


,257 


360 


,024 



Civil Defense 



Andover Civil Defense is authorized and required by the Massachusetts Civil 
Defense Acts of 1950, Chapter 639 (as amended), Section 13. The Director is 
appointed by the Town Manager. His function is to coordinate Andover ' s Civil 
Defense plan with the State Civil Defense plans and programs. The priority of 
Andover Civil Defense is planning, training and preparation to cope with any man- 
made or natural disaster. Andover Civil Defense also tries to assist other town 
departments in the accomplishment of their goals for the safety and convenience of 
Andover citizens. To accomplish this, Andover Civil Defense must depend on unpaid 
civic minded volunteers. 

These volunteers are divided into three (3) sections, a radio communication 
section consisting of fifteen (15) members, an Auxiliary Police section consisting 
of twenty (20) members that come under the command of the Chief of Police David L. 
Nicoll and a new addition of a disaster team consisting of eleven (11) members. 



Andover 's large areas of woodland and 
utilization of this land by individuals, sc 
to the possibility of problems regarding pu 
Director realizes the possibility of potent 
areas, applied to Federal Civil Defense Age 
four wheel drive jeep was obtained through 
to the town and allowed the Police Departme 
accessible to the regular patrol vehicles, 
better protection in these areas initiated 
the Game Wardens would patrol these areas i 
conservation land and enforcing laws concer 
This patrol was also responsible for discov 
areas where it was impossible for the regul 



conservation land, and the greater 
hools and other groups drew attention 
blic safety. Andover Civil Defense 
ial problems in these hard to get to 
ncy for a four wheel drive vehicle. A 
the surplus property program at no cost 
nt access to the areas which were in- 

The Chief of Police in order to provide 
a plan where the Auxiliary Police and 
n the summer months, protecting the 
ning the use of recreational vehicles, 
ering abandoned and stolen vehicles in 
ar patrol vehicle to check. 



The past year saw the outfitting of ten (10) new members of the Auxiliary 
Police and the replacing of some of the older uniforms. The Auxiliary Police had 
an active year assisting the regular police force. They were utilized to assist 
in traffic control and crowd control on Memorial Day, July 4, Halloween weekend 
and the Christmas parade. They were also requested by the Detective Division to 
help search for weapons used in the commission of two different crimes possibly 
disposed of in wooded areas. 

The biggest event of the year was the Bicentennial Parade which required the 
use of all twenty members of the Auxiliary Police to supplement the regular force 
in traffic and crowd control. The Auxiliary Police members also attended monthly 



31 



training sessions held at the police station covering the areas of First Aid, 
C.P.R., traffic control and radiological monitoring. 

The radio group continued their weekly meetings throughout the year training 
and testing their equipment. The radio group also played a major part during the 
Bicentennial Parade, assuring mobile communication amongst the Auxiliary Police 
officers and the police station. They also assisted the parade committee by 
supplying communication between the different parade units at the staging areas. 

Both the Auxiliary Police and the radio group were put on alert during the 
hurricane warning in the month of August. The emergency operating center was 
activated at the police station and arrangements had been made to assure communi- 
cation with all the other town departments. Portable generators were set up at 
the Town Hall and the BPW garage to insure continuous operation of these facilities 
in case of power failure. Andover Civil Defense stayed in constant communication 
with the State Civil Defense Headquarters issuing hurricane information by two way 
radios and telephone. Andover was prepared to meet this threat. These civic 
minded volunteers were ready and willing to assist the town in any way, to help 
combat this possible emergency. 

With the closing of the Andover Red Cross Chapter, Andover Civil Defense 
recruited members of their disaster team into our Civil Defense program. The 
training that these new members have in the area of First Aid is a definite benefit 
for the town in case of a disaster. These members also are all equipped with 
citizen band radios allowing communication between each member during an emergency. 

The past year has seen a drastic increase in the use of citizen band radios. 
Properly utilized, this is a definite advantage in areas of Public Safety. Andover 
Civil Defense applied for a grant and received a citizen band base station at no 
cost to the town. This was a grant awarded through the Governor's office from 
Federal C/P funds in an effort to assist the police and Public Safety officials in 
receiving reports of criminal activity, accidents or situations threatening the 
safety of the public. By the monitoring of Channel 9, the emergency channel on 
Citizen Band radios, we have direct contact with individuals who might want to 
report a problem or serious accident. It will definitely prove out to be a 
valuable piece of equipment for the police department. 

In the interest of the Andover citizen, the Andover Civil Defense and the 
Andover Police Association sponsored a Public Safety Day in May at the West Junior 
High School. On display outside was all different types of emergency vehicles, 
including police vehicles, fire vehicles, ambulance, Registry of Motor Vehicle 
and so forth. Inside many exhibits were on display and information was dissemi- 
nated concerning drugs, police equipment, alarms, water safety and motoring safety. 

The director in keeping abreast of changes in state and federal programs 
dealing with Civil Defense attended the following seminars: the first being held 
at the Holiday Inn in Lawrence on March 23, 24 and 25; the second being held at 
the Battle Green Inn in Lexington on September 14, 15 and 16; the third being 
held at the Battle Green Inn in Lexington in November. The Director also attends 
the weekly and monthly meetings of the Auxiliary Police and communication section. 
The Director also checks shelters and supplies throughout the year. 

Andover Civil Defense will only exist as long as we have these civic minded 
volunteers who know that they are not only helping the town but are also helping 
themselves to be able to cope with any emergency that might arise in Andover. 



Game Warden 



The activities of this department covered a wide area over the past year. 
Approximately 4,000 hours were spent in patrolling the Town. Areas covered 
included all Town land, Conservation Commission land and most AVIS property. 

32 



During the hurricane alert all men patrolled until the all clear was given at 
about 3 A.M. The Police Department was assisted in many cases where stolen, burnt 
and stripped cars were found and reported to the authorities. Some assistance was 
also given to the State Officers due to their heavy load on coastal patrol in con- 
taminated areas. 

Ice patrols were conducted to make people aware of the unsafe conditions for 
both ice skating and ice fishing. 

There were two occasions of dogs chasing deer in the deep snow. All three 
wardens were called out on this venture and the deer were saved from being destroyed; 
but the dogs were not apprehended. At this time the wardens would like to warn all 
owners of dogs that the State issues a restraining order every year when excessive 
snow develops, requiring all dog owners to restrain them for the duration of the 
emergency. Any dog found chasing or molesting deer may be destroyed. 

As in the past years, hunter safety and firearms courses were held and nearly 
100% of the students received their certificates. More classes will be held in the 
fall; applications for this firearms training program may be obtained at the Town 
Clerk's office or the Police Station. 

Civil Defense Director James Johnson's acquisition of a jeep at no cost to the 
Town except for the registration has allowed the wardens to patrol remote areas much 
more easily and faster than before. In many cases this patrolling has prevented 
violations of many Town Bylaws, especially firearms. 

The wardens are pleased to report that discharge of firearms was at a minimum 
this year due mainly, it is felt, to the patrolling and advice given to prospective 
hunters entering the Town during the season. 

As in the past, thanks are extended to Chief David L. Nicoll and his depart- 
ment for their continuing cooperation. 



Dog Officer 



Los t Dogs 1 29 

Dogs Found 69 

Dogs Ordered Restrained 78 

Dog Complaints 696 

Dogs Sold 33 

Money Turned in to Town Treasurer $99 . 00 

Owners Contacted for Unlicensed Dogs 485 

Cats Turned in to Pound 117 

Various Dead Animals Picked Up 301 

Impounded Dogs (Unlicensed) 150 

Impounded Dogs (Licensed) 10 



33 



Inspection Services 



The purpose of the Department of Inspection Services is to assure the compliance 
of private contractors and developers with the Planning Board's Rules and Regulations ; 
specifications of the Department of Public Works and all other Town regulations. 

Enforcement of rules and regulations is the responsibility of the General Con- 
struction Inspector and is carried out by daily inspections of all active subdivisions. 
The scope of the inspections includes the construction of roads within the subdivi- 
sion and all utilities, such as sanitary sewers, water mains, storm drainage, gas, 
electric and telephone. A full testing program is also conducted during and after 
construction to insure that specifications are met. All sanitary sewers and manholes 
are tested for infiltration before being placed in service. Water mains are subject 
to three separate tests prior to approval. These tests are pressure, leakage and 
bacteria; and unless all tests are satisfactory, no water main may be placed in 
service . 

At present there are approximately twenty-five subdivisions in various stages of 
construction. These stages range from plans on paper to completed subdivisions with 
streets submitted for acceptance. In the past year over 675 inspections were made on 
these subdivisions. These include the testing of sanitary sewers and water mains; 
water samples are also drawn for bacteria testing. 

The General Construction Inspector compiles reports for the Town Manager and the 
Director of Public Works. He also reports to the Planning Board on specific items 
requested and submits reports to the Board for information. The General Construction 
Inspector will check subdivisions for conformity with approved plans of the Andover 
Conservation Commission. 

In addition, the General Construction Inspector inspects street openings and 
maintains a cross-section file on all street openings and contractors. A file on in- 
surance coverage of all road contractors working within the Town is maintained. Also, 
the Construction Inspector can act as the Resident Inspector on projects under con- 
tract for the installation of sanitary sewers, water mains, storm drainage, sidewalks 
and similar projects. 



Electrical Inspection 



The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding 
of persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. 

Enforcement of the Massachusetts Electric Code is the responsibility of the 
Electrical Inspector's Department, Town Hall. The Electrical Inspector also has the 
responsibility of enforcing fire alarm regulations for new homes set by the Fire 
Department. Other duties include receiving, scheduling and granting of permits and 
inspections from this office on a daily basis; inspection of all residential, commer- 
cial and industrial jobs; certificate of inspection of schools, public buildings, day 
care centers, and nursing homes, formerly covered by the State; also, approve elec- 
trical plans for new buildings; inspect all buildings for certificate of occupancy; 
assist Fire Department in inspection of fires due to faulty electrical devices or 
equipment and see that permits are issued for repairs due to fire damage; assist the 
Building Department on junk car inspection; attend school and classes on revisions to 
the electrical code and power distribution systems to keep up with standards. 

Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the cooperation of Massa- 
chusetts Electric Company and corrected without incident. 

Also, the number of inspections per permit has increased, partially in the 
industrial-commercial areas, therefore, the department has completely revised and 

34 



increased the permit fees dealing with these areas. It is the intent of the Electrical 
Inspection Department to assure the citizens and businesses of Andover , a safe elec- 
trical installation to the fullest ability of the department. 

Following is a tabulation of the Electrical Permits issued for the July, 1974 
through 1976: 



7/74-12/75 



173 

6 

180 

468 



827 



TYPE 

New Dwellings 
Other Structures 
Additions & Alterations 
Others (sign, swimming pools, 

service changes, etc.) 
TOTAL 



FEES COLLECTED 

$2,890.00 
1,091.00 
1,120.00 

3,876.00 
$8,977.00 



1976 

178 

3 

200 

274 



655 



New Dwellings 
Other Structures 
Additions & Alterations 
Others (sign, swimming pools, 

service changes, etc.) 
TOTAL 



$2,852.00 

90.00 

2,510.75 

2,965.00 
$8,417.75 



Building Inspection 



The purpose and scope of the Massachusetts State Building Code is to provide for 
health, safety, and public welfare through structural strength and stability, adequate 
egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property from fire 
hazards incident to design. 

Enforcement of the Massachusetts State Building Code is the responsibility of 
the Department of Building Inspection, Town Hall. The Building Department also has 
the responsibility of enforcing the Town Zoning Bylaw, with their rulings subject to 
the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

All Board of Appeals applications are reviewed and processed through this office 
and, in addition, copies of its definitive action on all petitions are kept for the 
convenience of the general public. 

Electrical permits are processed through this department with the approval of 
the Electrical Inspector. Related records, fees, and reports are also maintained by 
this office for all three departments. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, as required in the Bylaw, all estab- 
lishments for license issuance were investigated, and inspection reports were filed 
with the Town Manager. Also, as required by the Massachusetts State Building Code, 
many other occupancies requiring licenses were investigated and certificates have 
been issued as defined Table 1-1, Massachusetts State Building Code. 

The Inspector of Buildings and Local Building Inspector have attended many 
courses of advanced education sponsored by the Commonwealth and Building Inspectors' 
organizations. Attendance at these Commonwealth courses is mandatory in order to 
attain certification under the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

Numerous building and zoning violations were investigated and corrected without 
incident . 

Considerable time has been spent during the past year in preparation for the 
many changes in design criteria and increased work load by this office relative to 
schools, special halls, nursing homes and many more, which were formerly under the 



35 



jurisdiction of the area State Inspector. Chapter 802, effective January 1, 1975, 
established a State Building Code Commission for the adoption and promulgation of a 
State Building Code, has created many demands upon this department for numerous, addi- 
tional reports, and many added man hours of inspections of new uses plus the work 
that was previously delegated to the State Inspector under Chapter 143 of the General 
Laws. Experience this past year is very indicative that full compliance with these 
mandates will require the services of one more full-time inspector, plus many more 
hours of important clerical work which is closely associated with an inspection de- 
partment that continues constantly to serve the Town to its greatest ability. 

Considerable effort was spent in past years on updating and approval of Building 
and Electrical permit fee schedules. This, along with Table 1-1 of the Massachusetts 
State Building Code, enables this department to continue on an expense - cost basis. 

Following is a tabulation of the Building Permits issued for the years 1971 
through 1976. 



1971 



Est. Val. 



Fees 



114 
45 

229 
76 

4~M 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 



$ 2,882,194.00 
5,513,249.00 
4,150,940.00 

166,370.00 
$12,712,753.00 



$23,253.00 



1972 

205 

62 

240 

102 



609 
4 



Dwelling & Garage 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Soil Removals 



$ 5,612,000.00 

743,420.00 

1,378,722.00 

166,290,00 
$ 7,900,432.00 



$22,236.00 

50.00 

$22,286.00 



1973 - 6/30/74 



243 

89 

417 

211 

960 
11 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Soil Removals 



7,495,280.00 
5,599,303.00 
2,602,480.00 

304,591.00 
$16,001,654.00 



$46,437.00 

72.00 

$46,509.00 



7/74 - 12/75 



168 
97 

478 
194 

937 
45 

1 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



6,041,500.00 
9,282,296.00 
2,707,277.00 

309,630.00 
$18,340,703.00 



$54,143.00 
1,425.00 

3.00 

$55,571.00 



36 



1976 



Est. Val. 



Fees 



183 

56 

360 

130 

729 

97 

1 



Dwellings & Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 6,704,000.00 
1,237,253.00 
1,359,664.00 

189,077.00 
$ 9,489,994.00 



$27,536.07 

6,051.00 

15.00 

$33,602.07 



Planning Board 



The laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts require any town having a popula- 
tion in excess of ten thousand inhabitants to establish a Planning Board. In Andover, 
the Planning Board consists of five members appointed by the Town Manager, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, for five year terms. One member is appointed annually. 
All serve without pay. The Board customarily meets on the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the 
month in the Planning Board office in the Town Hall. Additional meetings are fre- 
quently needed to complete the work load, to permit discussion with other Town Boards, 
and to allow subcommittees to function. 

State law delegates to Planning Boards two major areas of responsibility. The 
first, which might be called general planning, directs planning boards to "make care- 
ful studies and, when necessary, prepare plans of the resources, possibilities, and 
needs of the city or town." Related to this is the specific direction to prepare a 
master plan and, from time to time, extend, perfect, add to or change it, as the 
Board deems advisable. The second area of responsibility is the administration of 
subdivision control. 

In carrying out the first directive, the Planning Board is assisted by a con- 
sultant, currently Philip B. Herr & Associates, who provides much information con- 
cerning current planning practice and law as well as the ideas and experience gained 
from his work in other communities. In addition, the consultant spends much of his 
time in the gathering and analysis of data to provide adequate background information 
on specific topics or for special reports. 

An important part of the general planning function of a planning board is the 
maintenance of good communications with other boards and commissions. Consequently, 
the Planning Board Chairman meets regularly with the Town Manager, and the Board has 
met from time to time over the past year with the Selectmen and the School Committee, 
with representatives of the Conservation Commission and the Development & Industrial 
Commission among others. In addition, Planning Board delegates regularly attend all 
Board of Appeal hearings and meetings of the Merrimack Valley Regional Planning Com- 
mission and participated in the Historic District Study Committee, the Bikeways Com- 
mittee, the Growth Policy Committee, Solid Waste Committee, and the Traffic Committee . 
Finally, subcommittees of the Planning Board have been formed to deal with Post Office 
sites, open space and recreation, and problems of the Central Business District. The 
latter two subcommittees have had representation from other Town committees and from 
such citizen groups as the Chamber of Commerce and the League of Women Voters. 

As a result of these efforts, an updated Open Space and Recreation Report was 
published early in 1976. Having such a plan is essential for the Town to qualify for 
any State or Federal funding in these areas. The recommendations of this report pro- 
vided the basis for several warrant articles at the 1976 Annual Town Meeting. One of 
these, a major appropriation for the purchase of conservation and recreation land, 
was approved by the voters. The others, which dealt with improvements and new facil- 
ities at the Recreation Park, were reduced somewhat in amount but were substantially 
successful. Also at the Annual Town Meeting, the Planning Board introduced several 
major changes in industrial zoning. One involved a rezoning of industrial land east 
of Route 93 from Industrial A to Industrial D. The other was a tightening of the 
requirements for Industrial D Zones. The Planning Board believes that these somewhat 



37 



more restrictive regulations will ensure a high quality of industrial development in 
these this area of Town. These, also, were approved by Town Meeting. The search for 
an acceptable new post office site occupied a considerable amount of the Planning 
Board members' and consultant's time during the past year. Unfortunately, there 
appears to be no ideal site and so far no mutually acceptable compromise has been 
reached. Board members have also been deeply involved in discussions concerning the 
disposition of the Sacred Heart School and its possible conversion to apartments. A 
zoning bylaw change to accommodate such conversion has been drawn up for action, if 
needed, at the 1977 Annual Town Meeting. 

The Planning Board's second major area of responsibility, administration of 
subdivision control, takes up much of the regularly scheduled meeting time and many 
spare hours as well. It also occupies a substantial amount of the time of several 
Town employees. During the last year, the Board has reviewed six plans containing 
sixty-three lots, approving two with sixteen lots and disapproving two with thirty- 
one lots. Two plans having a total of sixteen lots are pending. Seventy-five lots 
having frontage on existing streets and of proper size were certified as not requir- 
ing Planning Board approval. The Planning Board continued to work with Arkwright- 
Boston on plans for further development of their industrial land in West Andover. 

The Central Business District Review Committee has prepared a new sign bylaw, 
designed to clarify and improve the existing bylaw, for presentation to the 1977 
Annual Town Meeting. Further changes in the Town's Zoning Bylaw will be needed to 
bring it into conformity with the recently revised Zoning Enabling Act. This work 
should be undertaken during the coming year to meet statutory requirements. It also 
appears that action on delineating flood- prone areas will be needed during 1977, as 
indications are that HUD final rate maps will be issued in the early months of the 
year . 



Board of Appeals 



The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapters 40A and 40B and the Town Bylaws. 
The Board meets on the first Thursday of every month in the second floor hall of Mem- 
orial Hall Library. Three regular members and three associate members are appointed 
by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings held by the Board of 
Appeals are the result of applications in the following areas: 

(1) for a variance from the requirements of Bylaws; 

(2) for a special permit under the Bylaws; 

(3) by a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building 
Inspector or other administrative officer; or 

(4) for permission to construct Low or Moderate Income 
Housing within the Town of Andover. 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters and abutters to abutters 
are notified, as required by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chair- 
man in conformity with Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations which were updated in 
June 1974. Following the hearing; the members of the Board view each property in 
question. Based on their view and the evidence presented at the hearing, a decision 
is rendered, signed and filed in the Town Clerk's Office. Parties in interest are 
notified of the Board's decision. 

In the period from January 1, 1976 through December 31, 1976, the Board of 
Appeals were as follows: 12 regular meetings were held and 46 petitions were heard, 
of the 46 petitions heard: 



38 



35 were granted 

5 were denied 

1 denied (petitioner's default) 

1 withdrawn 

4 pending 

$1,100 for hearing fees was collected and turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Weights and Measures 

The Department Sealed 209 weighing and measuring devices, adjusted 18, attached 
NOT SEALED labels on two units and designated one device as CONDEMNED. 

A total of 13,751 items were inspected for proper labeling, weight, count and 
volume content. While 9,635 items were found to be correct, 2,493 items were found 
to be deficient in content and 1,623 items were found to contain an amount in excess 
of declared quantity. 

Sealing fees for 1976 amounted to $294.10. Fees collected through December 31, 
1976 amounted to $288.10 which have been paid to the Town Treasurer. 

Development and Industrial Commission 

The year 1976 was a period of reorganization and enlarged activities for the 
Development and Industrial Commission (ADIC) . 

Early in the year, the Selectmen and the Commission defined a revitalized role 
for ADIC. This action resulted in an examination of the status and future of in- 
dustrial development in the Town, and defined ADIC operations in areas beyond 
routine industrial liaison. The Commission is now functioning in those directions 
that support and amplify Town policy and acknowledged goals. 

ADIC was reorganized under the chairmanship of Lawrence S. Spiegel and the 
size of the Commission was increased to 10 members, reflecting a variety of citizen, 
business and professional disciplines. Dr. Spiegel represented ADIC on the Andover 
Growth Policy Committee, as chairman of that group, which was responsible for the 
Growth Policy Survey. The importance of that survey lies in the unexpected response 
of overwhelming support for attracting clean industry as the top priority for the 
Town. 

Sustaining contact with the Board of Selectmen and work with the Town Manager's 
office and other boards provided the Commission the opportunity to function in a 
number of areas of importance. 

(1) An effective liaison system was established for maintaining close 
cooperation with existing industry and developers. 

(2) A program has been established for serving the needs of prospective 
industrial and commercial firms. 

(3) The publication of a brochure, describing the industrial potential and 
facts about Andover, is being readied. 

(4) A thorough industrial directory is being prepared to encourage the use 
of Andover businesses, for presentation to potential industrial firms 
and for general Town use. 

(5) Assistance has been made available to the Allied Chemical Company for 
disposal or use of its Dascomb Road property. 

39 



(6) Support has been given for the urgent need to expedite an 1-93 interchange 
in the Lowell Junction area. This will significantly reduce existing 
traffic congestion and will make more industrial development easier to 
accomplish. 

(7) Planning has also been done on 1-93 access improvement from the Andover 
Technological Center at River Road. 

(8) Responsibility for the Sacred Heart property was given to ADIC by the 
Board of Selectmen. At this writing, an established developer and 
manager of apartment rental properties is finalizing plans to undertake 
the task of converting the vacant Sacred Heart School into luxury apart- 
ments. Successful completion will result in considerable tax revenue 
and about 23 acres of open space for Town recreation and conservation. 

(9) Recommendations for possible solid waste recovery sites were provided, 
should a reclamation plant be located in Andover. 

(10) The assignment for a new postal facility has been undertaken, and is in 
the early stages of investigation and evaluation of needs and sites. 

(11) With the Planning Board, new regulations for Industry D Zoning were 
approved by the 1976 Town Meeting. 

(12) Also in conjunction with the Planning Board, work has been done on the 
improvement and function of the central business district. Updated 
regulations on signs have been completed. 

The year 1976 also saw the opening of the Hewlett-Packard Plant, the first 
industrial facility in the remarkable Andover Technological Center in West Andover. 
Continuing work with this group, other developers and prospective industry has been 
an ADIC function, which, hopefully, will result in increased tax revenues from firms, 
large and small, of the highest possible quality. 



Bikeways Committee 



The Andover Bikeways Committee, since its organization in August of 1975, met 
regularly to prepare a plan for presentation to the Town Meeting in April of 1976. 
A number of historical, interesting or beautiful locations were linked by a system 
of Bikeways which were laid out along existing town roads with minimum traffic 
flow. The Committee proposed that the Town appropriate funds to place bike racks 
at a dozen locations on these Bikeways, so that bikes would not be stolen while 
riders were walking around or enjoying the scenery. Locks would, of course, be each 
rider's responsibility. It was also proposed that several signs be placed at con- 
fusing turns and that directions on how to get to the various selected locations 
be printed up, using existing town maps as a base. 

The Finance Committee and the Selectmen, in an economy drive, chose to give a 
negative decision on the article. The Committee then did not present the original 
article for funding, but presented one which allowed the Town Manager to go after 
whatever State and/or Federal funds were available. At that time, this funding 
seemed reasonably soon in coming. 

Although the 1976 proposal was not funded, there now (January, 1977) appears 
to be a good chance of getting 75% support from the State, with the plan being put 
into operation for the late spring/early summer riding season of 1977. The Town 
will be asked to authorize the other 25%. 



40 



Housing Authority 



The occupancy of ninety-six (96) new elderly apartments in May, 1976, was the 
major accomplishment of the Andover Housing Authority as it continued to make prog- 
ress towards its goal of furnishing a decent home for every citizen of Andover. 

Thomas P. Eldred, a member of the Andover Housing Authority for twenty-one 
(21) years was re-elected by the townspeople to serve another five (5) year term. 
He was also re-elected by the Authority Members to serve as Chairman of the Board. 

John B. White, a member of the Authority for twelve (12) years, resigned at 
the end of the year. The Authority accepted his resignation with deep regret. 
Mr. White's dedication to the duties as a member of the Board was intense, dis- 
playing constant concern for Veterans and elderly residents of Andover. 

The Authority deemed it proper in our Bicentennial Year to request the Andover 
Bicentennial Committee to choose a historic and fitting name for the new Main 
Street project. The name "Frye Circle" was chosen by the Bicentennial Committee 
in memory of Captain Frye, an important figure in Andover's Militia during the 
Revolutionary War period. 

A waiting list for elderly public housing in Andover consists of 180 applicants 
and is growing steadily. Because there are 180 eligible applicants for elderly 
housing on a waiting list that is growing steadily, the Authority is giving serious 
consideration to the planning and feasibility of a new elderly project in Andover. 

With the formation of the Frye Circle Tenant Association, there are now four 
tenant organizations representing all four (4) housing projects in Andover. 
Modernization regulations of the Department of Community Affairs provides for an 
involvement in management objectives by a bonafide tenant organization. Properly 
implemented participation by our Tenant groups will have a decided effect on the 
type of modernization projects to be undertaken. 

Housing Assistance Program - Section 8 - #MA6E084001 

This Federally subsidized program permits applicants to live in private 
accommodations, paying approximately 25% of their adjusted income. The Town of 
Andover receives full taxes from the participating property owners. 

36 Units of Section 8 existing housing have been received by the Andover 
Housing Authority. 

30 Units are under contract (20 elderly - 10 family). 

Approximately 70 applicants are on the waiting list. 

A preliminary application for 24 more units was filed on December 3, 1976. 

Veterans Project 200-1 

This twelve (12) building complex, located at Memorial Circle near Chestnut 
and Morton Streets, consists of fifty-six (56) units. The breakdown by the number 
of bedrooms is as follows: 

Two (2) bedroom Three (3) bedroom Four (4) bedroom 

36 units 18 units 2 units 

There are forty (40) applicants on the waiting list for the Veterans Project. 
The average monthly rental is $137.00. 

41 



Two persons 


$6,300 


Three persons 


6,800 


Four persons 


7,300 


Five persons 


7,700 


Six persons 


8,100 


Seven persons 


8,400 


Eight persons 


8,700 



The yearly income limits are: 

For Admission For Continued Occupancy 

$8,190 
8,840 
9,490 
10,010 
10,530 
10,920 
11,310 

Sixteen (16) new families moved into the project this year and two (2) 
families moved on site. Eight (8) occupants that were eligible for elderly 
housing were transferred to the new elderly project, making units available 
for needy families. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses: 

INCOME 

Rents and Interest $84,985.59 

State Aid 23,479.20 $108,464.79 

EXPENSES 

Administration $ 8,396.48 

Utilities 40,382.46 

Maintenance and Labor 10,508.95 

General Expense 8,019.43 

Reserve and Debt Service 26,167.20 $ 93,474.52 

Surplus 14,990.27 

Total Expense and Surplus $108,464.79 

Grandview Terrace and Chestnut Court Projects 667-C 

The Elderly Housing Project, Andover 667-C consists of eighty (80) one bedroom 
units and a recreation hall. 

The new yearly income limits are: 

For Admission For Continued Occupancy 

One person $6,000 $7,800 

Two persons 6,300 8,190 

The average monthly rental is $64.00. 

In the last twelve (12) months, four (4) tenants moved into these projects 
and two (2) moved within the projects. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expense for these Elderly 
Projects for the last twelve (12) months: 

INCOME 

Rents and Interest $63,794.23 

State Aid 83,562.50 $147,356.73 



42 



EXPENSES 

Administration $ 8,987.94 

Utilities 22,060.56 

Maintenance and Labor 11,756.84 

General Expense 3,607.11 

Reserve and Debt Service 91,229.50 $137,641.95 

Surplus 9,714.78 

Total Expense and Surplus $147,356.73 

F rye Circle Project 667-3 

This new elderly project consists of ninety-six (96) new units in eleven (11) 
separate buildings and a recreation hall. 

The admission limits are the same as noted above in the Grandview Terrace and 
Chestnut Court elderly project. 

Of the ninety-six (96) units in occupancy, seven (7) are reserved for handi- 
capped persons. There are fourteen (14) couples and seventy-five (75) elderly 
individuals. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expense for the year 1976: 

INCOME 

Rents and Interests $58,903.20 

State Aid 94,875.53 $153,778.73 

EXPENSES 

Administration $ 6,530.57 

Utilities 20,611.57 

Maintenance and Labor 10,120.89 

General Expense 6,308.21 

Reserve and Debt Service 97,179.53 $140,750.77 

Surplus 13,027.96 

Total Expense and Surplus $153,778.73 



Recreation/Community Schools 



The Recreation/Community Schools Department has gathered momentum in its 
effort to provide diversified, quality programming for the Andover Community. 
From the implementation of the concept in 1972 through 1975, the primary emphasis 
has been expansion of existing programs and development of new programs reflective 
of community interests in the enrichment skills and academic subjects as well as 
in the recreational areas. During the 1975-1976 year the department placed greater 
emphasis on the creation of new diversified programs. While the development of new 
programs was occurring, there was simultaneously occurring an evaluation and up- 
grading of the quality of the existing programs previously offered. The evaluation 
process included individual class evaluation forms, community-wide surveys and in- 
class observation by department staff as well as the solicitation of verbal partici- 
pant feedback. Playground and waterfront evaluations resulted in many significant 
changes. Thus, the 1975-1976 year can be characterized as the year of assessment 
and growth, particularly in the human services area. 

The diversification effort has brought the department into the human service 
field. New programs included a lecture series on adolescents, personal growth 
workshops and a modern psychological therapy lecture series. The culmination of 
these efforts has been the addition of a section in the 1976-77 winter program 
brochure entitled Public and Human Service Programs. 

43 



In the summer of 1976, the entry into human services was further evidenced by 
two programs. The traditional, eight-week special needs summer program for mentally 
retarded and/or physically handicapped children between ages 6 and 21 was extended 
by seven hours per week. The program was structured to be a learning program in 
practical skills as well as a social experience. The department also responded to 
the need for a replacement of the former Project Deer jump program servicing 
emotionally/behaviorally disturbed and/or environmentally deprived elementary 
children. The new program, developed through the efforts of community residents 
and Andover teachers, was titled Project A.B.L.E. (A Better Life Experience). This 
program, funded through the cooperation of the Andover School Committee, was a four- 
week program emphasizing a therapeutic-recreational experience for elementary 
children who, because of social, behavioral or cultural factors, demonstrated a 
need for these services. The program was "therapeutic" in the sense that it was 
structured to provide social living experiences that developed a sense of individual 
and group responsibility and achievement. It was "recreational" in that it utilized 
activities normally associated with a recreation program as the vehicle for effect- 
ing positive behavioral growth. Project A.B.L.E. serviced a total of thirty-six 
children. The special needs camp registered thirty-four children. 

In response to a long-standing request, the Recreation/Community School 
Department created a pre-school playground program. The program was held three 
mornings a week at Sanborn School. Two supervisors, four leaders and two aides 
brought almost all regular playground activities to over seventy (70) four and 
five year olds. 

As in past summers, a large emphasis was placed on special interest programs 
for all ages. This was in addition to the summer playground activities held at 
five elementary schools. The academic summer school was held at Bancroft School 
where the department provided enrichment classes to supplement the academic 
courses. All playgrounds stressed the dual goals of providing a safe, enjoyable 
recreational activity environment while also providing the opportunity for children 
to learn new skills in activities such as woodworking, art, drama, needlework and 
crafts . 

Following the summer program, the department offered two ten-week sessions 
providing instruction in academics, practical skills and recreation. The success 
of these two programs, combined with numerous requests for a third term of pro- 
grams, resulted in a selection of 1976 spring programs. In the spring of 1975, 
a small number of classes were offered. Those offered were only those requested 
by the community. The spring program of 1976 was the first official set of spring 
classes, publicized together with the winter courses in a combined 1976 winter/ 
spring program brochure. The program was well received by the community. While 
the fall and winter programs offered more than 120 classes each, and registered 
more than 2,000 people in each 10-week session, the spring program had 21 courses 
and produced a registration of 380 people. 

As the instructional program and the delivery of human services has grown, so 
has the recreational component of the department. There has been an increase in 
the number and kinds of trips and special events offered. Over eighty junior/ 
senior high students took advantage of two overnight ski trips offered by the de- 
partment. There were a large number of both youth and family trips to places of 
interest in the Greater Boston area. In addition to existing annual competitions 
in gymnastics, volleyball, ping-pong and soapbox derby (Andy 500), the department 
initiated new competitions in bowling, tennis, bicycle racing (Bicentennial Cup 
Race) and cross country running. The number of participants in each of the afore- 
mentioned competitions was impressive. The department playground also hosted a 
Good Sportsman Competition on the 4th of July in conjunction with the day long 
July 4th celebration activities 

The department has been involved in providing programs for Senior Citizens. 
There was a big turnout for the "Day in the Park" in June during which Senior 
Citizens enjoyed games, contests, singing and a full luncheon. A set of "Older 
Resident" courses is offered in each ten-week session to provide more convenient 
daytime programming of interest to Senior Citizens. All Recreation/Community 
Schools programs are offered free of charge to those over 60. 

44 



Under the joint auspices of the Andover Artists Guild and the Recreation/ 
Community Schools Department, the Second Annual Art-in-the-Park exhibit was held 
in October. More than 100 amateur and professional artists assembled in the park 
to exhibit and sell their works of art in water color, oils, photography and 
sculpture. As an adjunct to the successful art show, the American Field Service 
and the Recreation/Community Schools Department joined to offer the First Annual 
Craf ts-in-the-Park show. In May of 1976, more than 90 professional and amateur 
crafts people displayed their handiwork. Both events were well attended by the 
Andover community. 

The 1976 Annual Town Meeting approved a special article in the sum of $46,000 
to construct a set of lighted tennis courts in the Recreation Park as well as com- 
plete an erosion control program designed to eliminate soil erosion in the north 
end of the park. In the same year, the community saw the official opening of the 
new Pomps Pond bathhouse. The building was utilized extensively throughout the 
bathing season. The waterfront activities were expanded to include instructional 
courses in diving and competitive swimming. The traditional swimming instructional 
program registered more than 400 children and adults for the six weeks of lessons. 

It has been the objective of the Recreation/Community Schools Department since 
its conception in 1972, that the department would be a full service community pro- 
gram reflective of the Andover community interests. The diversification evidenced 
in this report suggests that the objective has been met. Future direction should 
be through community input aiming toward a balanced delivery of recreational, 
academic, social service and enrichment programs. 



Conservation Commission 



By a margin of a few votes over the necessary 2/3 majority, Annual Town 
Meeting passed Article 47 to raise by bonding $780,000.00 for the purchase of 
a number of important open space and recreation areas. This Article was the 
result of months of preparatory work by many Boards and individuals, and was 
inserted at the joint request of the Conservation Commission, Planning Board and 
Recreation/Community Schools Committee. It was also supported by an organization 
known as the Friends of Shawsheen, formed mainly to protect Shawsheen Village 
from the effects of unsuitable development of the Sacred Heart School property. 
Since this vote, the Conservation Commission and several other Town officials 
and committees have acted as quickly as possible to attempt to carry out its terms, 

The largest parcel so far acquired under this Article is the 175 acres more 
or less of land formerly owned by various developers and intended for housing, 
now known as the Bald Hill site. This single largest Conservation acquisition to 
date lies in the watersheds of Haggetts Pond and Fish Brook and extends partly up 
the flank of Wood Hill, the second highest hill in Andover. Its importance for 
water supply protection, for recreational and conservation use can hardly be over- 
stated. It borders hundreds of acres of land open for public use and enjoyment, 
and is separated from Haggetts Pond, which it overlooks and which is also mostly 
surrounded by public open space, only by Route 495. The Bald Hill-Wood Hill site 
is currently being reconnoitered by the Trails Committee, for the extension of its 
existing trails and the development of new ones. It includes a great variety of 
topography, vegetation and wildlife habitat and has a considerable area of un- 
forested land suitable for more active recreational use. Self -Help Funding has 
been applied for. 

The multi-purpose Sacred Heart property has been the subject from the be- 
ginning of cooperative effort and planning. The Conservation Commission expects 
eventually to control for conservation use the very scenic portion of its open 
land along the Shawsheen River that has not been developed for active recreation. 

Other 1976 acquisitions for conservation purposes: 

45 



(1) Booth property, 8g acres of Skug River lowland off Salem Street. 

(2) Aubut property, 2 acre portion of the abandoned B & M right-of- 
way running south of Bellevue Road. 

(3) 5.8 acres of wetlands bordering the North Reading line and South 
Main Street (tax title transfer). 

Total town-owned conservation land is now approximately 785 acres. 

"Self-Help Funds" from the State for up to 50% of conservation purchases by 
the various Towns were replenished in 1976, and some reimbursements are to be 
expected during 1977 for applications already made. 

It is with deepest sadness that we must report the death of Albert Alexander 
III, known as Pal to his many friends, a few months after his resignation as a 
member of the Conservation Commission. He had served the Town in that capacity 
for 4 years, with loyalty, skill, devotion and tough expertise and we miss him 
very badly. He had agreed to continue serving us until a successor could be found, 
and during the summer of 1976, Robert Pustell, a veteran of the Planning Board and 
political office in Medford and now an Andover resident, was appointed to take 
his place. 

Administration of the Wetlands Protection Act now occupies most of the time 
and attention of the Commission. During 1976, with increasing experience, pro- 
cedures have become much more thorough and sophisticated. A total of 15 public 
hearings were held in 1976, a number of them continued for more than one session, 
and all required much follow-up work. Our Civil Engineer is now assisted in wet- 
lands work by the Construction Supervisor, Mr. James Rand. 

New methods of cooperation and information-sharing have been set up amongst 
the Conservation Commission, the Planning Board, the Board of Health and the 
Building Inspector to insure that proper conditions are not only imposed, but 
carried out, to protect the public interest and the private land owner. Of the 
15 Orders of Conditions issued for various projects, two were appealed to the 
State Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. In one instance, the local 
Commission's Order was modified to allow building (since denied however, by the 
Board of Health) and in the second, the local Commission's Order was upheld. 

Notice has been given in the Townsman that the Commission has now promulgated 
new "Instructions for Preparation of the Notice of Intent" for all persons planning 
to do any work involving alteration of wetlands as defined by the Wetlands Protection 
Act. These "Instructions" are the product of many discussions, consultations and 
much research and are intended to help both the developer and the Conservation 
Commission to observe the provisions of the statute. 

New and simplified regulations for the use of conservation land, prepared by 
the late Mr. Alexander, are now printed on durable signs to be placed on all con- 
servation land as soon as practicable. 

The revised Recreation-Open Space report prepared by a committee including 
representatives of the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and Recreation/ 
Community Schools Committee, with the aid of the Planning Board's consultant, 
was published early in 1976. This document fulfills State and Federal Planning 
requirements for eligibility for funding of recreational and open space projects, 
and has been so useful that it is already in need of revision, many of its 
recommendations having been carried out. The same committee has been reactivated 
and will revise the report in the coming year. The Open Space Map, which accom- 
panies the report (also to be updated), has been very popular and is available 
separately at several stores and in the Town Hall, at $1.00 per copy. 

The Conservation Commission participated actively during 1976 in the Massa- 
chusetts Environmental Coalition, an ad hoc group of many conservation oriented 
groups with the purpose of supporting the environmental movement at the State 
level, specifically the adequate funding of the Executive Office of Environmental 

46 



Affairs. 

The Chairman of the Commission served as a member of Andover's Growth Policy 
Committee, whose report has now been transmitted to the State. 

Community gardening continued its expansion in 1976, and 62 garden plots were 
allocated to individuals at the former Shlakis property along the Merrimack River. 
The further decline of farming in Andover continues to be a concern of the Con- 
servation Commission. One of the aims of the Conservation Commission is to keep 
open and productive those hay fields under its control and to reclaim others as 
far as practicable. At some future time these open areas could be used for re- 
creational purposes as needed. 

The Trails Committee continued its work of clearing and marking new trails 
during 1976. During the summer, under the direction of Mr. Stanley Holter, a crew 
of young CETA employees worked on maintenance chores and trail-building and marking 
in a number of conservation areas; including construction of rustic bridges. The 
cost to the Town consisted only of mileage for Mr. Holter 's vehicle and a few hand 
tools for the young workmen. 

During 1976, the Commission investigated both local wetlands bylaws to re- 
inforce the Wetlands Protection Act, and wetlands mapping of the entire Town. The 
proposal to ask the Town to enact a local wetlands protection bylaw to reinforce 
the Wetlands Protection Act has been abandoned. The Commission has decided, how 
ever, to present an article for consideration at the Annual Town Meeting of 1977 for 
funding not only of accurate Wetlands Mapping, including evaluation of all signifi- 
cant wetlands and detailed drainage date for the entire Town, but also of adequate 
base mapping of the entire Town, so that wetlands boundaries may be accurately 
located. Such base maps would be of great value to the Department of Public Works, 
the Planning Board, the Board of Health and the Assessors, as well as providing the 
Conservation Commission with definitive location of all wetlands. The Conservation 
Commission's efficiency in the protection of the Town's wetlands would be much 
improved by such mapping. These maps would also be of use to potential developers. 

Management of the numerous conservation holdings, large and small, scattered 
throughout the Town, is becoming ever more challenging. The Commission's objectives 
are to insure the preservation of these areas, to promote their use for appropriate 
activities and to protect them from abuse. There is a real need for more volunteers 
to serve as overseers of these properties. Much can be done by people who care. 
We have had one really heartening example this year: Mrs. Louise Van Everen of 
School Street "took over" the neglected corner of School Street and Lupine Road 
known as Rogers Dell and with neighborhood children and adults, Appalachian Mountain 
Club friends, some CETA help, some Tree Department help and a few dollars from the 
Conservation Commission's budget for a park bench, has transformed an unsightly 
dump into a neighborhood park. The deepest admiration and thanks of all of us are 
owed to Louise. 



Council on Aging 



The Council on Aging, which was formed to develop and direct recreational, 
educational and counseling programs for adults 60 years of age and over in Andover, 
had a busy, constructive year. 

The Andover Haven, the center for Andover's senior citizens, moved to a new 
location at 11 Essex Street in July and occupies the entire second floor of the 
former Theatre Building with offices, recreation rooms and classrooms. The Town 
has set aside $12,000 for building renovations, which are presently underway with 
some assistance from the Lawrence Vocational School students. The use of some of 
the rooms is available to the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and its 
Auxiliary on five nights each month. 



47 



A new program called The Friendly Visitor Program, operating in cooperation 
with the Council on Aging, has an office at The Haven. The Board of Health holds 
mini-clinics every Tuesday afternoon at one of the following: The Haven, Frye 
Circle, Chestnut Court or the Ballardvale Community Church. Mrs. Mary Hamilton, the 
Town's Public Health Nurse, is available for coasultations with the elderly once a 
week in her office at The Haven. 

The Haven staff presently consists of Doris Hudgins, the Director; Jean Warren, 
part-time secretary; Jennie Faraci, Senior Aide; and three part-time drivers for 
The Haven station wagon, Clayton Northey, Leslie Westfall and Owen Hinckley. The 
duties of Mrs. Faraci, who is employed part-time by Elder Services of the Merrimack 
Valley, are to outreach into the community to contact elders who may have a need 
for the services offered by that organization and to supply transportation for those 
with special needs. Many elders come to The Haven to inquire about these services. 

The Haven is fortunate in having many loyal volunteers who assist in the office 
and with the elders who stay all day. They also help with transportation to the 
West Elementary School for the daily lunch program; there is a very great need for 
more volunteers, especially for drivers to help with transportation. 

The daily lunch program is very active and fills a real need in giving an 
elderly person who is alone one well-balanced meal each day, together with the 
association of being with friends. Planning of the transportation is done by 
Clayton Northey and he is assisted by several volunteer drivers. Approximately 
25 persons are taken to lunch each day, and in 1976 there were 8,181 served. 
Those requiring transportation are picked up at their homes, at The Haven or 
at the elderly housing projects. 

Another important service is the transportation for shopping and doctor 
appointments by The Haven station wagon. Also available two mornings a week 
is a Lawrence mini-bus, and on Wednesday mornings a bus for shopping at the 
North Andover Mall is provided by Demoulas' Market. 

The new facility on Essex Street has enabled the Council to expand activities 
and services to aid Andover' s senior citizens. Approximately 20 to 35 come to the 
center daily to take advantage of the various services. It is busy five days a 
week with classes including Bridge, French, Oil Painting, Book Haven (a book review 
class sponsored by Memorial Library), Singing for Joy with J. Everett Collins, 
Sewing and Crafts Workshop. With the cooperation of the Andover Recreation/Commun- 
ity Schools Department, classes are held in Macrame, Easy Body Movements, Ceramics 
and Sand Sculpturing. The Haven is the meeting place for the Associates, an 
organization open to all residents over 60, for the Council on Aging and for local 
and State groups serving the elderly. 

There is card playing available at all times, as well as socializing with 
piano playing, television and music. Plans are also underway to hold suppers and 
socials in the large recreation room. Bakery sales, potluck suppers, movies and 
the annual Christmas Fair are held at the facility. 

Present officers of The Haven Associates are: George Reynolds, President; 
Owen Hinckley, Vice-President; Ada Buchan, Secretary; Frank Markey, Treasurer; 
Ola Coleman, Sunshine Committee; Margaret Hatch, Activities Chairman; Eva Muise 
and Isabel Valentine, Ways and Means Committee Co-Chairmen. 

During 1976 day trips were arranged for senior citizens to visit places of 
interest such as Mt . Washington, the Topsfield Fair, Lake Sunapee, the State House 
and Chateau de Ville. Longer trips to Ogunquit, Hyannis, the Pennsylvania Dutch 
Country, Bermuda and England were also conducted. 

In October, when the Chamber of Commerce sponsored Sweetest Day, The Haven 
staff and volunteers delivered flowers to all local nursing home patients and to 
residents of both housing projects. 

In conjunction with the Andover School Department another important program 
is underway. Long-time residents of Andover are being contacted by a committee in 

48 






an effort to record on tape their memories and recollections of the many changes 
in Andover. 

There are always two to five elderly who are brought to The Haven or come by 
themselves to stay all day. These Day Care people are usually lonely and need to 
be loved and kept active. There is the feeling that there are many more elderly 
in Andover who need this type of Day Care. 

The Council on Aging feels The Haven is filling an increasingly important 
community need. 



Memorial Hall Library 



Steady growth and continued concern with serving all of the population of 
Andover mark the future goals of the Library as well as current day-to-day appli- 
cation. A recent check of records indicated 84% of the local population held 
library cards, an exceedingly large percentage for any municipality of any size. 
Several surveys on different days and at different times of the year show an 
average of 800 people a day, or 3% of the Town, pass through the doors of the 
library. Although the record is a good one, the desire to be even better remains 
strong. With last year's land acquisition and the continually tightening space 
problems within the library, it is time to begin planning for future expansion 
carefully, economically and thoroughly. 

Programs, although fewer in the adult section, have had very good attendance. 
Three book discussion groups have been meeting regularly. The Library Opera Club 
continues and has expanded. Speed reading stays popular and has been offered at 
least twice a year for the past three years. United Nations Day programs, jazz 
bands, symphony orchestras, Scott Nearing, Woman Seen with Florence Luscomb, income 
tax sessions, paper cutting demonstrations, arts and crafts festival, cardiopul- 
monary resuscitation classes and the Friday night film series are all programs 
presented during the year. 

The monthly exhibits of Massachusetts artists and varied interesting displays 
were mounted. A bibliography of Andover women authors was compiled. 

The Friends of Memorial Hall Library continue to lend physical and financial 
support to library activities. They are the ones who made possible the Xerox 
copier, the Christmas program, more "Get ting-Better Boxes" for the Children's 
Room, the annual book sale and lovely refreshments for many occasions. Many volun- 
teers have been working, both members of the Friends and others, who have willingly 
offered their services. These public-minded individuals have provided great services 
to the library and many tasks would go undone without them. 

The Library trustees had, for the first time, a Trustee Emeritus in the person 
of Edward I. Erickson whose service as Trustee for many years was recognized. John 
W. Kimball was appointed to Mr. Erickson' s expired position. 

Library staff are still the most valued assets of Memorial Hall Library. Two 
retirements took place during the year, that of Marjorie Johnson of the Circulation 
Department and Isabelle Eldridge of the Children's Room. 

New staff appointments include the following: Dan Barczak, Bridget Bennett, 
Beatrice Chadwick, Marilyn Demers, Roberta Fournier, Angel Gonzalez, Elaine LeGendre, 
Ann Takesian, Helene Watt and Mary White. 



49 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 





Adult 


Juve 


nile 


Total 




1974-5* 


1976** 


1974-5 


1976 


1974-5 


1976 


REGISTRATION OF 














BORROWERS 


4,349 


2,726 


1,162 


767 


5,511 


3,493 


BOOK STOCK & USE 














Vols, at end of 














reporting year 


99,427 


104,655 


27,922 


27,391 


127,349 


132,046 


Pbs. at end of 














reporting year 














Vols, added 


9,680 


5,896 


1,796 


1,144 


11,476 


7,040 


Pbs . added 




700 




121 




821 


Vols, withdrawn 


2,910 


1,168 


476 


1,675 


3,386 


2,843 


Pbs. withdrawn 




453 




12 




465 


Vols, circulated 
(incl. periodicals 


























& pamphlets) 


369,448 


251,233 


150,885 


105,815 


520,303 


357,048 


INTERLIBRARY LOAN 














Books borrowed 


958 


777 










Books loaned 


12,491 


7,892 











AUDIO-VISUAL 



Fr. Prints & 

Sculpture 
Records 

Slides & Filmsts. 
Microf ilm/f iche 
Films (reels) 
Other-equipment & 

children's puzzles 

GRAND TOTAL 
CIRCULATION 

PERIODICALS & 
NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 
Gifts 

ACTIVITY GROUPS 



Adult Programs 
Story Hours/Preschool 
School Class Visits 
Other Juvenile Programs 



Owned at end of 
reporting year 



553,939 379,999 



411 
11 



381 
8 



215 


66 


124 


108 


66 


71 


148 


139 



PERSONNEL 

Total Budget 
Personnel Services 

PER CAPITA 

(based on '75 census) 



$584,783 $408,262 
405,790 284,681 



Added 



321 


337 


20 


5,986 


6,452 


596 


1,527 


1,511 


2 


4,403 


4,470 


67 


238 


276 





Withdrawn 



Circulated 



4 

130 

9 


1,418 

25,258 

668 


781 

19,082 

639 




3,527 


1,914 


- 


2,765 


1,790 



50 






1974-5* 1976** 
BOOK STOCK 4.9 5.8 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 14.2 13.73 

*A11 1974-75 statistics are based on an eighteen-month time period. 
**A11 1976 figures are based on January 1, 1976 - December 31, 1976. 



Bicentennial Committee 



Andover's Bicentennial celebration officially started in May of 1975, con- 
tinued actively throughout the year and began reaching a peak in May of 1976. 

The Town's history will be passed on to future generations in a creative and 
personal fashion thanks to the many local women who completed the Bicentennial 
quilt. The quilt, consisting of 28 squares depicting Andover's past and present, 
has been given to the Andover Historical Society. 

Andover's month-long celebration began on May 6, 1976 with a Founder's Day 
Candlelight Ceremony, parade and re-enactment of the purchase of the Town from the 
Indians. A sudden rain shower didn't stop hundreds of people already assembled in 
front of the Town Hall from turning on their heels and following the Andover High 
School Band to the Memorial Auditorium to watch the festive spirit of over two 
hundred students, Andover's Militia and the Wakefield Red Men's Band. 

The largest parade ever to be seen in Andover was held on May 9, 1976. Twenty 
marching units, sixteen floats and ten walking groups held Andover residents' 
attention for over two hours on a bright and sunny Sunday afternoon. Two hundred 
and fifty chairs were available for senior citizens and handicapped persons. 

Following the parade an old-fashioned picnic complete with entertainment, 
games for the youngsters, and a pie-baking contest delighted all weary parade 
viewers. 

On May 16, 1976 Andover held a day-long exhibit of craft demonstrations. 
Over one hundred craft people were on hand to show their handiwork. 

A review of historic homes and landmarks was combined with a flower and garden 
tour on the last three Sundays in May. Many people who were unable to attend the 
house tours in October of 1975 were delighted to be able to participate during the 
May tours. 

Hundreds of Andover residents wearing Colonial costumes celebrated the 
country's two hundredth birthday at the Town's Bicentennial Ball. The Sheraton 
Rolling Green, decorated in red, white and blue, lent itself nicely to the formal 
grand march, review of costumes and champagne toast to the country. 

July 4, 1976 began in Andover very early with a graveside service conducted 
by Rev. J. Everett Bodge and the Andover Militia Company at the South Church 
Cemetery. The service was a tribute to those from Andover who answered the call 
to arms in 1776. 

The Militia led their fellow Andoverites up the hill to the Cochran Chapel 
at Phillips Academy, where twelve hundred people participated in an Ecumenical 
Service. Following the service at the Chapel an hour-long recital was played by 
the Academy Bell Tower Carillonneur , during which time the townspeople enjoyed a 
breakfast of eggs, ham, rolls and juice. 



51 



Starting at noon in the playstead, band concerts, children's games and rides, 
art exhibits, antique displays and a craft show brought out the largest crowd 
Andover has ever seen. 

Following the singing of the National Anthem, a special Bicentennial fireworks 
display was set off at dusk for an estimated fifteen thousand people. 

Bicentennial funds also were used for the completion of the Greater Lawrence 
Historical Bibliography, Andover High School's student exchange with Andover, 
England and a memorial to the Revolutionary dead now under construction at the 
corner of School and Central Streets. The focal point of the park is a large 
boulder on which a bronze plaque will be mounted. Inscribed on the plaque will 
be the following: "In Memoriam . . . .Town of Andover . . . .list of those who 
die .... 'He fought the fight, he kept the step, loyal and brave and true. 
For a free land he paid the price, Comrades, that day for.' . . . .Erected by the 
Town in this Bicentennial Year 1976." 



AVIS 



On July 21, 1976, Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS) and the Con- 
servation Commission cooperated in the purchase of a parcel of 14.46 acres from 
Mr. & Mrs. James A. Booth, fronting on the southerly side of Salem Street, directly 
opposite the AVIS Skug River Reservation. The Conservation Commission obtained the 
section fronting on Salem Street, consisting of 8.40 acres, while AVIS obtained the 
back section consisting of 6.06 acres, including a 40 foot right of way through 
the front section to give access to the back section. Except for a small section 
of the river directly off Salem Street, this acquisition gives protection to both 
banks of the river for an additional distance of about \ mile. 

AVIS and the Conservation Commission now own a block of 53.4 acres of con- 
servation land in this vicinity, which is continuous from Korinthian Way in the 
housing development on Gray Road to Salem Street, and now across Salem Street 
southerly along the Skug River. Of this land, the Conservation Commission owns 
17.7 acres, while AVIS owns 35.7 acres, including the Hammond Reservation, the 
original Skug River Reservation, the adjacent parcel acquired last year from 
Phillips Academy and the newly acquired parcel from Mr. & Mrs. Booth. The entire 
acquisition, both by AVIS and the Conservation Commission, is for the purposes of 
preventing the pollution of the river, preserving the Town's water table and making 
this land available for public use. 

The 30.3 Amy Gordon Taft Memorial Reservation has been under lease to AVIS by 
Miss Rebekah L. Taft since 1972. It has been Miss Taft's intention to deed succes- 
sive portions of the reservation to AVIS from time to time. She has done this by 
conveying to AVIS in 1972, a section fronting on Vine Street, and in 1974 another 
section adjoining the first. Now, in 1976, Miss Taft has made a third conveyance, 
leaving in her ownership only a small section along Wildwood Road, which she plans 
to convey to AVIS at a later date. AVIS sincerely appreciates Miss Taft's gener- 
osity in making this attractive reservation available for public use through lease 
since 1972 and its gradual conveyance to AVIS ownership. 

Substantial work has been done on AVIS reservations during the year for main- 
tenance and improving their usefulness for the public. Of particular mention is 
the series of bridges built over the swamp area of the Vale Reservation, one of 
which is 46 feet long. Credit for planning and executing this project goes to 
President Nat Smith, assisted by a group of Phillips Academy students. 

A new venture was initiated this year between AVIS and the local chapter of 
the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) whereby joint hikes on several reservations 
were conducted. The public was invited to participate and large numbers attended. 



52 



The annual family outing and canoe races on the Shawsheen River in May met 
with the same enthusiastic response as in previous years. At the Annual Meeting 
in November, Harper Follansbee presented a most interesting slide talk on his 
experiences in Kenya, Africa, stressing the "Inter-cultural Action Learning" in 
that country, in which he participated. At that meeting four new Trustees were 
elected: Eeda Jill Belkin, Rachel Garcia, Donald D. Sagaser and Alfred A. Spatola, 
The following persons were re-elected: Nat Smith, President; Claus Dengler and 
Harold Rafton, First and Second Vice-Presidents; Ruth Hayes, Secretary; and David 
MacDonald, Treasurer. Marilyn Beattie was elected as Third Vice-President. 

This report must regretfully end in a sad note. On November 16, only a few 
days after her re-election, Ruth Hayes died suddenly. She had served AVIS as 
secretary for many years, cheerfully and efficiently, and her loss is deeply 
mourned. The Board has elected Tom Cone to replace Ruth as secretary. 



Veterans' Services 



The Department of Veterans' Services is operated under the provisions of 
Chapter 115, General Laws of the Commonwealth. It is mandatory that all cities 
and towns of Massachusetts provide financial aid to needy veterans and their 
dependents who qualify for such aid. Before aid is given, each case is thoroughly 
investigated and all information obtained is treated with strictest confidence. 
The town is reimbursed 50% by the State for all costs expended for this aid. 

Information, advice and assistance is also given to enable veterans and their 
dependents to procure the Federal benefits to which they are entitled. Some of 
these benefits include medical care, pension, education, insurance, home loans, 
social security and supplemental security. Through diligent efforts on the part 
of this office in pursuing these benefits, more than $60,000 was secured in the 
past year. 

Under the Federal Omnibus Health Care Act of 1976, veterans' medical services 
as provided by the V.A. has been greatly expanded to include services to non-service- 
connected medical problems such as alcoholic, drugs and psychiatric. 

An eight percent increase in non-service-connected pensions went into effect 
in 1976. The law also increased the annual countable income limitation governing 
payment of non-service-connected pensions. Limitations are presently $3540 for a 
single veteran totally disabled before age 65. At 65 or older health is no factor. 
Widows and dependent parents who survive veterans are also entitled to pensions. 
The income limitations for those have increased to $3540 for a widow alone and 
$4760 for a widow with children. 

Through close cooperation with the Federal Government's C.E.T.A. program a 
number of unemployed Andover veterans have been placed in jobs with town agencies. 
This program is expected to expand in 1977, and will further assist veterans who 
are out of work. It is our policy to locate employment for the unemployed rather 
than placing them on our rolls. 

This office coordinates Memorial Day and Veterans' Day with local Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Post 2128 and the American Legion Post 8. The graves of more than 
1,100 veterans interred in local cemeteries are decorated on those two holidays 
with new American flags. 

Thirty-three veterans died in the past twelve months; eight World War I, 
twenty World War II and five Korean Campaign men. The dependents of all these 
veterans were assisted in making applications for the benefits to which they are 
entitled, including a burial allowance of $400 or $800 as qualified, headstone 
markers, insurance, widows' and children's pensions. 



53 



With the many changes and revisions in Federal Laws and the expected changes 
in the directives of the State Commission of Veterans' Services, it is expected 
to be a very busy office in the coming year. 



Historical Commission 



The Andover Historical Commission's efforts during the Republic's 200th year 
were concentrated on the many events and celebrations conducted by the town. Mem- 
bers of this commission served on the Bicentennial Committee, the Historic District 
Study Committee and as advisors to Col. Edward M. Harris while he prepared "Andover 
in the American Revolution". The Commission is fortunate to have as its newest 
member Norma Gammon, Chairman of the Andover Bicentennial Committee. 

The Historical Commission continued its efforts to complete the community-wide 
historical and architectural survey begun in 1975. The commission received a grant 
of $2,500 in matching funds from the Massachusetts Historical Commission to com- 
plete historical research on particular buildings and provide photographs to be 
attached to the survey forms. 

The commission members were pleased with the acceptance of its historic bro- 
chure by the townspeople. The brochure is available at the public library and the 
Town Clerk's office and was available at the booth operated by the Bicentennial 
Committee during Andover 's Bicentennial events. Large numbers of the brochure were 
sold at these locations. 

In addition to the Bicentennial activities, the Commission Co-chairmen, Philip 
Allen and Philip Dargie, served on the Growth Policy Committee. The commission 
responded to requests for information from residents and the Massachusetts Bicen- 
tennial Commission. At the request of several residents, the commission voiced its 
concern to the Selectmen in September about the effects tree trimming would have on 
historic houses on River Road. 

Also in September, the commission voted unanimous support of an article pro- 
posed, and later withdrawn by the Historic District Study Committee. 

The Historical Commission meets at 7:30 PM on the third Monday of the month. 
Interested townspeople are encouraged to attend. 



Traffic Committee 



The Traffic Committee met five times during the year to consider various 
traffic problems within the Town. Requests were reviewed for parking bans on 
Haverhill Street, Whittier Street, Bancroft Road, Central Street and Essex Street 
with recommendations thereon forwarded to the Board of Selectmen. Posted speed 
regulations were recommended for Lupine Road and Salem Street, together with 
pedestrian control regulations. Each of these was approved by the Selectmen. 

Considerable attention was given to complaints from the residents of Brundrett 
Avenue on the problem of speeding on that short road. Alternate methods for control 
of this problem were considered. By the end of the year, the Committee was awaiting I 
comments on the problem from the State Department of Public Works. 



54 



Fourth of July Celebration 



The 1976 Fourth of July Celebration, which was the seventh Andover celebration, 
was held in conjunction with the Bicentennial Celebration. An account of the day's 
events is contained in the Bicentennial Committee's report. 

Following is a Statement of Income and Expenses for the 1976 Celebration: 

Income: Ticket Sales 

(sold @.15 ea., 6 per $1.00) * $3,885.30 

Less refund to Bicentennial Comm. 450.00 $3,435.30 

Donations 875.00 875.00 

Advance Ticket Sales 6. 00 

$4,316.30 
Transfer of Town Appropriated Funds * 2,500.00 

Total Income $6,816.30 

Expenses: Music $1,975.00 

Less reimbursement from Summer 

Series Concert 300.00 $1,675.00 

Food, Ingredients, Equipment 1,768.13 

Rides 1,565.00 

Prizes, Awards, Badges 1,063.10 

Balloons 380.78 

Advertising 132.30 

Misc. Expenses (incl. lunches) 85.14 

Electrical (Sound truck) 100.00 $ 6,769.45 

Net Profit $ 46.85 

*An additional $3,000.00 of funds appropriated by the Town was not transferred 
to this committee. As has been the custom in past years, the Town has used 
these funds to directly pay for the fireworks display. 

STATEMENT OF RETAINED EARNINGS 
as of December 31, 1976 

Beginning Balance $549.13 

Profit from 1976 Celebration 46.85 

Ending Balance $595.98 

COMPARATIVE EXPENSE WORKSHEET 
for the Years 1975 and 1976 

1975 1976 

Fireworks $2,200.00 $3,000.00 

Music: 

Afternoon Contract 850.00 1,275.00 

Calliope 150.00 200.00 

Clan MacPherson 275.00 250.00 

Drum & Bugle Corp 325.00 250.00 



55 



Food: 

Hot Dogs 

Drinks 

Ice Cream 

Ice 

Sugar 

Rolls 

Pop Corn, Cotton Candy, etc, 

Rental Equipment 

Rides: 

Contract 
Other 

Prizes: 

H & H Paper 
National Discount 
Badges 
Trophies 

Other: 

Balloons 

Advertising 

Lumber 



1975 



1976 



342 


.00 


567 


.50 


373 


.92 


129 


.00 


41 


.70 


159 


.00 


229 


.65 


82 


.00 


1,200. 


00 


75. 


00 


272. 


85 


454. 


24 


73. 


56 


45. 


00 


278. 


05 


116. 


55 


34. 


95 



328 


.00 


538 


.00 


365 


.63 


141 


.50 


36 


.00 


174 


.90 


104 


,25 


60 


,00 


,400. 


00 


165. 


00 


336. 


05 


654. 


33 


72. 


72 


380. 


78 


132. 


30 


57. 


40 



Sale of Property 



During the past 12-month period the following sales of property were made: 



Scrap Metal 

Used Equipment 

Used Furniture, etc. 



$ 930.00 
224.00 
242.00 

$1,396.00 



Animal Inspection 



The following is a statistical report of the activities of the Inspector of 
Animals for the calendar year 1976. 



No. of dogs quarantined and examined for signs of Rabies 52 

No. of dogs found to have Rabies 

No. of other animals examined for Rabies 6 

No. of animals found to have Rabies 1 

Barns Inspected 70 

Horses 170 

Dairy Herds 6 

Dairy Cows 14 

Dairy Bulls 5 

Beef Cattle 20 

Goats 8 

Sheep 8 
Swine 1,100 



Bat 



56 



Board of Health 



SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS 

A. General : 

1. The department sponsored and/or conducted one hundred and two clinics 
as follows: 

a. Two rabies immunization clinics for dogs. 910 dogs were 
immunized which is an increase of 29% above that for 1975. 

b. Forty-one mini clinics for the senior citizens which 
provided 665 services for these people. 

c. Four flu clinics for 1,609 citizens. 

d. Four hypertension clinics for 245 citizens. 

e. Five mantoux clinics for 611 citizens. 

f. Eleven ambliopia clinics for 438 citizens. 

g. Twenty-five blood lead clinics for 32 citizens. 

2. Income was $16,799 for 1,469 licenses. 

B. Enforcement - (See Chart III) 

These activities consisted of warning letters, hearings before the Board, 
license revocations and court actions. 

Enforcement increased since 1975 by 102% in the disposal works program 
primarily due to the many problems encountered with construction on 
Mohawk Road, Seneca Circle and Eagle Way. The Food Program enforcement 
activities increased by 119% over 1975 due to an overall increased empha- 
sis in food work during the first six months of the year. 

C. Amendments : 

1. Chapter III, Food Regulations were amended to include requirements 
for plans, specifications, equipment and installation of equipment. 

2. Chapter IV, Pigs & Piggeries Regulations were amended providing that 
no licenses are to be issued to new applicants after April 22, 1976 
and setting the expiration date of such licenses each year. 

3. Chapter V, Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems Regulations were amended 
four times as follows: 

a. Clarifying filling requirements around leach systems. 

b. Stipulating minimum distances between leach areas and areas 
reserved for expansion. 

c. Setting the minimum requirements of estimated sewage per bedroom 
per day used to determine the size of the leaching system. 

d. Changing references to certain State Departments, names of their 
codes and code numbers to conform to current practices and pro- 
cedures now legally accepted. 

57 



PROGRAMS (See Charts I, II and III) 

A. Personal Health : 

These services increased seven percent above that reported for 1975 or 
1974. This increase was due primarily to the swine flu innoculations 
as shown under communicable disease. 

Geriatric work (Senior citizen program) continued at approximately the same 
level as for 1975; however, the lead poisoning work has almost disappeared. 

Personal Health Services accounted for about 41% of all services and 24% 
of available man-hours of time of the department. 

B. Gas, Plumbing & Sewer : 

These services increased almost fifty percent above that experienced in 
1975 and seventeen percent above that for 1974. These services accounted 
for about 20% of the services and 23% of the available man-hours of time 
of the department. 

C. Environmental Health : 

Services in this category decreased below that for 1975 for the following 
reasons: 

1. We lost 42% of one man's time, who had primary responsibility for 
the disposal works program. 

2. The Food Program work was drastically reduced because: 

a. Percolation tests from March to June 1976 exceeded those 

in 1975 by 213% which required delegation of our sanitarian 
on food inspection to this work. 

b. Because of one man's resignation, it became necessary to again 
delegate our sanitarian to work in the area of the disposal 
works program from August through December. 

3. The number of complaints received this year were considerable less 
than previous year and therefore less services were experienced. 

4. Other services were down almost 50% for the same reasons that food 
work was reduced. 

Services in Environmental Health accounted for about 40% of all services 
and 53% of all available man-hours of time. 

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. If we had not lost so much of one man's time because of his resignation 
we would have been able to have had 1,351 food services rather than the 
707 experienced. 

2. The use of tape recorders in 1977 is expected to increase the number of 
food inspections and their quality because the clerical aspects of report 
writing is eliminated. Also, recording of problems immediately on tapes 
will increase the quality by comparison to committing problems to notes 
and memory for recording on reports later. 

3. The greater volume and quality of food inspection reports in 1977 may at 
first increase Enforcement demands above that experienced in 1976. 

4. Should the requests for blood lead testing continue to decrease, we may 
want to consider dropping this work and referring people to their private 
physicians or the Greater Lawrence Lead Paint Program. 

58 





m 


u t* 


0\ 




CD 


t> 


en 




a 








CO 


u 


a 


V 





c 


Sh 


h-( 


o 







^ 


P 



CD 


m 


<* 


iH 


CD 


t> 


o 


^ 


in 


o 


<tf 


t» 


iH 
rH 


o 

CD 


CD 


■H< 

CO 


CO 


rH 


rH 


m 


00 


o 

CNJ 




o 


+ 


1 


+ 


1 


+ 


1 


1 


i 


i 


1 


+ 


+ 



SH 


PS 


o 


+j 







e^H 




tfl 









o 




•H 




> 


• 


fn 








is w 



03 
C4 



K 

:* 

03 
Q 



« 

03 

H 
CJ 

M 

> 

PS 

w 

03 



SH ai 

o P 

O 



CO 





o 


•H 


> 


• m 


O 


iz; 03 



«H B$ 

O P 

o 



M 





O 


•H 


> 


• U 





55 03 



m 


CO 


■* 


m 


t* 


l> 


CO 


l> 


CD 


CO 


o 


o 


co 

CN 


o 


o 

rH 


CO 


o 


CN 


CD 


rH 


CO 


CD 

CO 


o 

CN 


o 
o 



CN 


CN 


X 


00 


o 


CO 


CO 


co 


00 


m 


cd 




iH 


CO 


m 



<N 



CO 

in 



m 
in 



■^ 



X 


X 


X 


CD 


CO 


t* 


CO 


CO 


X 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


o 


m 


CO 



CO 



t* 


o 


CO 


X 


X 


!> 



co t» m ^t< 

C~ O X CO 

t» t> iH t> 

CN 



CN 

O 



IM 



CO 
CD 



CO 


CO 


CO 


t> 


CD 


CM 


CD 


CN 


I> 


CD 


m 


O 


CO 
iH 


CO 


o 

rH 


m 


CN 

CO 


CN 


t> 


-tf 


CO 
iH 


CN 

m 


rH 


o 
o 



<# 


CM 


<tf 


CM 


CN 


CO 


X 


X 


T* 



CN 



O 

m 



m iH 



CD 

CO 



o 


•* 


o 


t> 


CO 


co 


CD 


m 


m 


O 


CD 


X 


CO 

CO 


CN 

CM 


■* 


CO 


m 

iH 


co 


o 

CN 


O 
O 



CN 


X 


t^ 


m 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 




t* 


X 


CD 


CO 


l> 


CD 


O 


CD 




o 


CD 


CO 


CO 


■* 


iH 


CD 


CN 




•\ 


•\ 






• 


•* 




r, 


X CN 


CO 


iH 






rH 


■* 


iH] 


CD 


CD CO 
CD CD 



<tf l> 



I I 
































CO 





















X) 












U 










CO 










p 

















CN CO 






d 










rH 












^ 




l> l> 

















Bi 

















CD CD 






CO 























X 




iH rH 




£! 


■H 










w 




















P 


p 


hD 










CO 










•\ 




CO CO 




iH 




a 








iH 


.* 










bfi 









a 





•H 








ai 


H 










C 


w 


o o 







iH 


c 








4-> 













•H 


1-3 


•H -H 




a 


■O 





CO 






C 


13: 




CO 






X5 


< 


> > 






a 


CO 


o 













-p 






s 


Eh 


H H 


03 


rH 


o 


•H 


•H 






s 


iH 




G 






s 


o 





s 


a 


•H 


9 


u 






c 


Bj 




■H 






rH 


Eh 


X w 


< 


a 


c 


ex 


p 




CO 


o 


CO 




BJ 




CO 


ft 






en 





3 




a 


u 


iH 


u 







iH 


u 


iH 




Q 


rH rH 


o 


CD 


£ 


73 


■H 





a 


•H 


a 


T3 


a 





O 


p, 


^ 


BJ Bi 


o 


u 


1 


a 


U 


X! 


p 


> 


CO 





a 


J3 


P 


CO 


<! 


P -P 


B 


* 


O 








P 


o 


a 


•H 





o 


P 





BJ 


K 


o o 


o 


J 


o 


o 


Eh 


w 


P 


fH 


o 


O 


Eh 


O 


O 


Eh Eh 



59 






w w 


o u 


< M 


OS > 


w a 


> H 


<J co 


Ph a 


o a 


Dh 


CO 


B § 


O M 


K H 



LO 

CM 



<5> 



CO 
01 



CM 



Cft 



CM 



to 
o 



CM 

o 



CM 



CM 



CO 
00 



en 




i> 




<y> 




rH 




CO 




s 


HH 


<: 


<t< co 


PS 

o 


Eh g 
O 5 


o 


H O 


s 


a 

Pm 1 




O S3 


>H 




03 


6^S 


|Z5 




O 




hh 




Eh 




<fl 




bd 




l-H 




J 




hH 




B 


CO 


Pi 


g 


w 


o 


& 


a 


g 


i 

S3 


S3 


S a 
N 




J HH 




<; J 




Eh m 




gg 



Eh 

a 



CO 

S 
3 

8 
K 



00 



CM CO 



CM 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


to 

CO 


00 


"HH 


LO 


CO 

in 


CO 
CM 


o 
o 

rH 



l> CO 

t> 



CM 



CM 



CM 



CO 


I> 


CO 


CO 


<tf 


t> 


CO 


I> 


CO 



CO 






■* 



CM 



O 
CO 
Ci 



co 




el 









03 




•H 




Q 


bo 




c 





•H 


rH 


c 


.a 





a 


CO 


o 


•H 


•H 


o 


fl 


Oh 


3 




S 


-o 


S 


d 








o 


J 



co 
o 

■H 

?H 
■P 

«S 
•H 

H 

o 



M 


X! 



■P 

o 

Eh 



CO 
X 

rH 
O 



CO 

o 
a 

CO 



T3 
O 

O 

Pn 



CO 

-p 

c 



£ 
O 

u 



rH 


■P 

o 



a 

4-> 

o 

Eh 



CO 
U 



CO 



bfl 

c 

•H 

£ 
3 
rH 
ft 



CO 
O 



CO 

J 

EH 

O 

Eh 



o 



CO 

rH 

CS 


CO 

3 
o 

•H 

> 





•a 


N 
•H 
rH 
•H 
■P 

a 

CO 

rH 

3 
O 

a 
i 
c 

03 



H l> 00 
CM ■>* to 

C5 l> CO 



m <* co 
t> i> t> 

CJ5 CD O 



60 



o 


o 


CO 


CO 


t<- 


t> 

CO 


co 

CM 


00 


rH 
rH 


t>- 


1 


+ 


+ 


1 


+ 



r-l 


«H cd 


O P 


o 


*£E-< 



CO 



"* 



Ol 
O 



oi 



o 
o 



a 


m 


^ 


Nl 


rH 


p 


rH 


CO 


t> 


CM 


o 


CM 


1-1 


:; 


"* 


H 











CO 
Ol 



o 

00 



o 

CO 
00 

GO* 



m 


X 


rH 


w 


CM 


CM 



CO 

ci 



u 










CD 


CI 


Ol 


t>| 


in 


x; 


m 


m 


CO 


in 


p 






1 


rH 


o 











rH 


«h d 


-P 


O 


b^H 



in 
cx> 





01 




CD 




o 




•H 




> 


• 


rH 


o 


(1) 


S5 


73 



rH 00 CO 



00 



00 
CM 



CD 



CM 



cm m co 

05 O rH 

cm r> 



o 
o 



ci 

CO 



re 




S 




$ 


o 


O 


o 


o 


&H 


E 





m 



co ol 

CM rH 



CO 
CI 



rH 


«H rt 


-P 


O 


fc^En 



CO CO 



01 



OS 



o 



CO 
CM 



10 
<D 
U 

ca c 

CD 
(0 5h 

bfl CD 

C <H 

•h a 
•p o 

© 



re 
co 



rH 


CO 


CM 


^ 


00 


t~ 


co 


CO 





O H 



CM CO 



O 

o 



Ol 
Ol 
CM 

Ol 



(0 

c 
o 

•H 
•P 

o 

<D 

a 

C 



■P 

c 

CD 

S 
CD 
O 
in 
O 

<w 

c 

H 



C 

o 

•H 
■P 

rt 

c 

•H 
TJ 

rH 
O 

o 
o 



re 

g 

o 



W 



Ol 
Ol 



Ol 



ml 

CM 



CO 

t> 









re 








J 


CO 


in 


^ 


< 


!>• 


t* 


t* 


H 


Ol 


01 


Ol 


e> 



rH rH rH H 



61 



Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc. 



This program operates by contract agreement with the Town of Andover, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen and under the auspices of the Board of Health. 
Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc. (formerly the Greater Lawrence Community Drug 
Council, Inc. - name changed 8/76) is headed by Katherine Mella, Executive Direc- 
tor. This program provides free, professional individual, family and group coun- 
seling to Andover adolescents and their families. The Andover Outreach counseling 
team, Barbara Zeidwerg Sorkin, MA., ATR and Pamela Burt, are professionals with 
experience and training in psychology, education and the expressive therapies. 
Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc. offers the following services to residents of the 
Greater Lawrence area: 

1. Substance abuse (alcohol and drugs) treatment, prevention and educa- 
tional programs to the communities and school systems including: 
resource and referral information; individual, family and group 
counseling; presentations to various community organizations; and 

a series of Middle School Health Class presentations focusing on 
family and peer inter-relationships, the special problems of 
adolescents, values clarification, problem-solving and an under- 
standing of the social and personal reasons for drug and alcohol 
abuse in today's world. 

2. Counseling centers, including two in Andover: (a) the Ballardvale 
Connection located in the Ballardvale Community Center on Center 
Street. The Ballardvale Connection provides counseling, structured 
after-school activities, and self-development/expression groups, 
Monday and Thursday, 2:30 - 5:00 P.M. Beginning in February, the 
Ballardvale Connection will sponsor a Wednesday Movie Day in 
addition to existing programs. (b) The Andover Connection Coun- 
seling Center located at 77 Main Street which functions as a 
structured group and youth/family counseling center. 

3. Alternative Learning Programs in conjunction with the high schools of 
North Andover, Lawrence and Methuen. These programs facilitate an 
understanding of communication and socialization skills in a supportive 
and flexible learning environment. Adolescent students are encouraged 
to understand and change destructive behavioral patterns through more 
effective expression of thoughts and feelings. The courses are in- 
structed by staff teacher /counselors. 

4. The Andover Youth Needs Providers Committee. Greater Lawrence Outreach 
sponsors monthly meetings designed to explore youth problem areas, ex- 
change talents, skills, resource and referral information and to mini- 
mize duplication of youth needs services. Providers include repre- 
sentatives from the high school, junior high schools, the Recreation/ 
Community Schools Department, the Board of Health, Y.M.C.A., Greater 
Lawrence Family Service Association, Greater Lawrence Mental Health 
Center, church youth program directors, students, Pupil Personnel 
Director, CORE team members and other private, mental health agencies. 

5. A four-part lecture series entitled "Adolescence: A Time of Conflict." 

6. Single-parent groups and adolescent groups focusing on mutual problems, 
and learning/sharing support groups. These are offered at both Andover 
facilities. 

The breakdown of services rendered is as follows: 

January 1, 1976 - December 31, 1976 

62 



In total, 267 Andover residents were serviced in the following areas: Ballard- 
vale Drop-in/Structured After-School Group: 78 people, 432 times; 47 individuals 
were seen in counseling for a total of 260 sessions; 8 families were seen in family 
counseling involving 21 people for a total of 37 sessions; 30 students received the 
four-part adolescent health class presentation series; 8 parents were seen in 
parent counseling for a total of 41 sessions; 4 adolescents and single parents 
took part in 20 group sessions; 85 people attended a four-part lecture series on 
adolescence; 35 Andover women were involved in presentations of adolescent problems 
at a monthly organizational meeting; 5 adolescents took part in a three day New 
Hampshire camping outing this summer; additionally, there were: 102 consultations 
with school and mental health personnel, 53 adolescent advocacy involvements, 20 
home visits, 26 crisis interventions and 25 referrals. 

Both Outreach team members, Mrs. Sorkin, ATR and Ms. Burt are committed to 
working with adolescents, families and other adolescent needs providers before 
the problems of this teenage group manifest themselves in destructive behavior, 
i.e,,drug or alcohol abuse, maladjusted social and/or sexual development. 

Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center 



The past year has been one of change and growth for the Mental Health Center. 
With the addition of a full-time psychiatrist, several part-time therapists and, 
most recently, a business manager, the staff has reached almost its full comple- 
ment for the first time in several years. This has meant that the Center's ability 
to meet the many demands for service has increased substantially. 

In terms of patient care, the Adult Service has been the fastest growing of 
the three developmental units. There are presently thirty-five active cases in 
the Adult Unit who are Andover residents and several more who are being treated 
in the Thursday Afternoon Clinic which services between thirty and thirty-five 
patients each week. In the five month period between September 1, 1976 and Janu- 
ary 31, 1977, there have been 208 adult visits made. 

Twenty Andover families representing a minimum of sixty persons have continued 
to be seen in the Child and Adolescent Units for a total of 144 visits during that 
same five-month period. However, with the increased capability of the school sys- 
tem to evaluate special needs (Ch. 766) children, fewer school referrals are being 
received. 

The Senior Counseling Service in the person of Mary C. Farr, M.S.W., has con- 
tinued to work closely with Mary Hamilton, R.N., and Doris Hudgins, Director of 
the Council on Aging, attending the Well Elderly Health Clinics, making home visits 
and accepting referrals for service for the sixty and over age group and their 
families. An excellent program, highlighting the attitudes and concerns of those 
living with or responsible for older persons, was presented at Merrimack College 
in the fall, as a joint effort of the Senior Counseling Service and the Community 
Unit. 

In addition, the Senior Counseling Service and the Community Unit provided 
consultation and support both before and after the development of the Friendly 
Visitor Program to those residents of Andover who were most closely involved with 
the program. Miss Farr is also participating in the in-service training of the 
Friendly Visitors. 

A new alliance between the Center and the Police Department has been estab- 
lished to assist in evaluating disturbed individuals possibly requiring hospitali- 
zation who come to the attention of the Department. 

Consultation to Greater Lawrence Outreach and to the Andover Connection is 
still being provided. Consultation is also available to the schools and has been 
given to other organizations in Andover, such as C.L.A.S.S. (Citizens League for 

63 



Adult Special Services) which is setting up a pre-vocational program for young 
retarded adults at Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High. Screening 
and evaluation of Andover residents for this program is currently in process at 
the Center. Consultation is also being provided to Fidelity House II in Andover. 

The Center, this year as in the past, has arranged for speakers for local 
church groups and other organizations to present material on a variety of mental 
health issues. 

Other programs of the Mental Health Center which do not directly impact on 
Andover but serve the larger community are: 1) The Hispano Mental Health Program 
which provides a variety of therapeutic services for the Spanish speaking, as well 
as consultation and in-service training to others working with the Spanish speak- 
ing; and 2) The Parent-Child Home Program which has served thirty (Title I) 
families this year including three Spanish, three French, three Black and one 
Vietnamese. 



North East Solid Waste Committee 



The former Greater Lawrence Solid Waste Committee has been meeting at least 
monthly during the year. Because of the increase in the number of communities 
that are interested in this project the name was changed to the North East Solid 
Waste Committee. The committee presently consists of the following communities: 
Amesbury, Andover, Georgetown, Groveland, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lowell, Methuen, 
Newburyport, North Andover, Plaistow, N. H., Reading, Salisbury and Seabrook, N. H. 

Selectman Susan T. Poore is Andover's voting member and Town Manager, J. May- 
nard Austin and the Director of Public Works, Robert E. McQuade, make up the Town's 
representatives on this committee. The goal of this committee is to investigate 
various methods of solid waste disposal (excluding landfill) and recommend a site 
and determine cost involved in such disposal. To date this committee has con- 
centrated on a Resource Recovery Facility. 

The main thrust of the work during the past year has been by the negotiating 
subcommittee chaired by J. Maynard Austin. This committee has been negotiating a 
contract with Universal Oil Products who have been selected to build and operate 
the proposed facility. The negotiating committee is now rewriting the third draft 
of the contract. When the major items of the contract have been determined, the 
contract will be presented to each interested community for review and comments. 
In order to provide the amount of solid waste required to produce the lowest cost 
to each community, it will be necessary to contact and enlist the efforts of some 
fifty communities in the northeast section of the State. 

By referendum ballot, the City of Haverhill has indicated its unwillingness to 
host the proposed facility. The subcommittee on site was reorganized and now are 
reviewing seven new possible sites. 

The present schedule calls for a new site to be selected and preliminary 
contracts with UOP to be presented to the communities during 1977. 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 



The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District is charged with providing treatment 
facilities for all wastewater discharged into the Merrimack River from the member 
communities consisting of Methuen, Lawrence, North Andover and Andover. 

The following is an update on the construction for the facilities required to 

64 



provide adequate treatment of all wastewater: 

Contract No. 1 - Wastewater Treatment Plant that includes the Administrative 
Building, Plant Water Pumping Station, Activated Sludge 
Pumping Station, Main Electrical Distribution Building, 
Flotation Building ahd the Process and Maintenance Building. 
As of December 31, 1976, this contract was 98.4 percent 
complete. 

Contract No. 2 - Pumping Station was 99.7 percent complete as of December 31, 
1976. 

Contract No. 3 - Intercepting Sewers, 99.3 percent complete. 

Contract No. 4 - Intercepting Sewers, 95.6 percent complete. 

Contract No. 5 - Wastewater Meter Stations, 100 percent complete. 

The entire project is scheduled to be completed by January, 1977 and it appears 
that the progress at the present time will insure meeting the scheduled completion 
date. 

The first year's operation and maintenance cost is estimated at $2,313,350 
of which Andover's share will be approximately 12.5 percent or $289,169. The 
Town's share of the capital cost is 8.0 percent of the District cost and a bond 
issue was made resulting in an annual cost of $54,127. 



Engineering 



Field surveys, construction plans and specifications, competitive bidding, 
field layout and on-site inspections -were provided for the following list of 
projects: 

1. Storm Drainage - 9,100 linear feet of storm drains were installed under 
four major contracts in the following locations: Haverhill St, Liberty 
St, Carlisle St, High St, Burnham Rd, Pleasant St, Gray Rd, Haggetts Pond 
Rd, Essex St, Salem St, Tewksbury St, Bradley Rd, Aspen Circle, Donald 
Circle, Parkhurst and Sagamore. 

2. Water Mains - Recreation Park for fire protection and water service to 
new bath house. 

3. Resurfaced the High School running track with a resilient pavement. 

4. Highway guardrails. 

5. Concrete Sidewalks on North Main St. 

6. Repaved Lakeside Circle. 

7. Site work for four new tennis courts at Recreation Park. 

8. Erosion Control for protection of banks at Recreation Park. 

9. Traffic lights installation on Lowell St. at Beacon St. and Shawsheen Rd. 

10. Bridge repairs at Central St. and Stevens St. including concrete repairs, 
installing new sidewalks and painting. 

For the Planning Board preliminary and definitive plans for six (6) sub- 
divisions of land with a total of 63 lots were reviewed to determine conformance 

65 



with its rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utili- 
ties. Problem areas in subdivisions under construction were reviewed with the 
Construction Inspector. Legal discriptions for easements and roadway layouts were 
checked before they were filed in the Registry of Deeds. 

Miscellaneous 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where applicable for the 
projects outlined above and for the Conservation Commission. 

Ninety granite street line bounds were set in River St, High Plain Rd, and 
Cross St, and other scattered locations. 

Many plans, drawings and sketches were prepared for the Selectmen, Town 
Manager, and the various Town Departments and Boards including a street layout plan 
for a portion of Greenwood that was not carried through Town Meeting. 

Many Town citizens were assisted in obtaining information about existing 
utilities, street layouts and other general information. 

This division assisted in providing street opening permits for underground 
utilities. 

The Town was represented in engineering matters with the Federal, State and 
County governments, principally concerning HUD Flood Hazard maps, Elm Street 
reconstruction, Chapter 90 work and County layouts. 

The engineering records of the Town were maintained and other Town depart- 
ments were aided in obtaining such information. 

The Engineering Division consists of two full-time employees with three 
civil engineering students employed part-time during the summer months. 



Water Department 



The water division of the Department of Public Works consists of eighteen 
(18) full-time eimployees including the Superintendent. The division is re- 
sponsible for the supply, treatment and distribution of drinking water to the 
community. The major components of the water system are as follows: 

Supply: Haggetts Pond 
Fish Brook 
Merrimack River 
Abbott Well 

Treatment : 

Water Filtration Plant 

Chlorination Facilities - Fish Brook 

Treatment Facilities - Abbott Well 

Pumping Stations: 

Water Treatment Plant 
Fish Brook 
Bancroft Road 

Distribution System: 

Storage Reservoirs 

Bancroft Road 
Prospect Hill 
Wood Hill 

Distribution Pipes - 163 miles 
66 



Since the dedication in October 1974 of the Water Filtration Plant at Hag- 
getts Pond, the staff has conducted numerous tours for students in all grades of 
the Andover school system, colleges throughout New England, various local clubs, 
and visitors from all over the world. 

This past year the May meeting of the New England Water Works Association 
was held in Andover with members attending and touring the facility. 

The total water pumped to the system from Januaryl, 1976 thru December 31, 
1976 was 1,440,321,000 gallons. During this same period a total of 427,304,000 
gallons of water was diverted to other sources. The average daily pumping was 
3,946,085 gallons with a maximum day of 9,475,000 gallons occurring on June 24, 
1976. 



Water Services 



Leaks 



Hydrants 



Water Meters 



Taps for water mains made - 4 
Taps for water services made - 13 



House service leaks repaired - 25 
Water main breaks repaired - 13 



Hydrants repaired or replaced - 18 
New hydrants installed - 34 



New water meters installed -228 

Old meters replaced - 38 

Water meters repaired - 9 

Field meters serviced - 16 
(Spring and Fall) 

562 telephone calls were recorded for turning water on or off, curb and gate 
boxes repaired, location of services, meter leaks, etc. 

Additions to the water system by acceptance of streets: 



Rock Dundee Road 


1,605 


feet 


of 


8" C. L.C.I. Pipe 


Rose Glen Drive 


2,629 


feet 


of 


8" 




Lakeside Circle 


1,275 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Rutgers Road 


2,950 


feet 


of 


10" 




Hampton Lane 


720 


feet 


of 


6" 




Rindge Road 


640 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Sheffield Circle 


530 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Azalea Drive 


662 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Snowberry Road 


414 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Fern Road 


312 


feet 


of 


8" 




Abbott Bridge Drive 


2,382 


feet 


of 


8" 




Danforth Circle 


443 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Spruce Circle 


453 


feet 


of 


6" " * 




Eastman Road 


1,383 


feet 


of 


8" 




Livingston Circle 


348 


feet 


of 


6" " » 




Jefferson Lane 


1,029 


feet 


of 


6" " ' 




Hartford Circle 


888 


feet 


of 


8" " » 





In July 1976 bids for a new three million gallon prestressed concrete reser- 
voir on Holt Hill were opened and the contract awarded to Natgun Corporation of 
Wakefield, Mass. , and as of December 1976, ninety per cent of the work was com- 
pleted. The completion of the reservoir is scheduled for the summer of 1977. 



67 



For the last twelve months of 1976 the division received $2,483.55 for 
special services, also 15,300,930 gallons of water was sold to North Reading, 
16,944,000 gallons of water was sold to Lawrence and 1,020,000 gallons of water 
was sold to Tewksbury on emergency basis for the sum of $38,809.36. 



Sewers 



The sewer division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for the 
operation and maintenance of the sewerage ejector station on Dale Street, Ballard- 
vale, the sewerage ejector station on Bridle Path Road, the sewerage pumping 
station at West Elementary School, the wastewater pumping station located on 
Riverina Road in Shawsheen and the sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes sixty-one (61) miles of sanitary sewers and 3,590 
connections. The Riverina Road pumping station discharges by means of a force main 
through the City of Lawrence to the Merrimack River. The raw sewage discharge 
from Riverina Road will be collected by the Greater Lawrence Regional Wastewater 
Treatment Plant which is scheduled to go on line by January 1977. 

The abandonment of the Ballardvale Treatment Plant was completed and in ser- 
vice on September 1976 by T.J. Kiley, Inc. of Lynn, Mass. This contract elimi- 
nated all wastewater discharging into the Shawsheen River and replaced the old 
treatment plant with a sewerage ejector station that pumps the sewerage to Andover 
Street, then flows gravity into the Shawsheen River interceptor line. 

In the summer of 1976, the #2 pump at Riverina Station was repaired and com- 
pleted shortly after. 

The West Andover Sewer Contract along the Merrimack River to service the West 
Andover Industrial Park was completed in July 1976 by the J.F. White Construction 
Co. of Newton, Mass. 

During the past year the Red Spring Road sewer in the vicinity of Moraine 
Street was inspected, cleaned, tested, and joints sealed by the Penetryn System of 
Merrimack, N.H. Normally this sewer would have to be excavated and replaced by a 
new main, but under the method used the repairs were made internally and leaks 
sealed by a chemical grout which was a considerable savings to the Tow n. 

Also, during this time the Harding Street inverted siphon was lowered by 
James Bateson, Jr. due to the track relocation by the Boston 8s Maine Railroad. 

In the past year, the sewer division rodded and freed blockages in 20 sewer 
main locations, and approximately 65 calls for assistance from homeowners with 
private sewer service problems were answered. 

The sewer maintenance program continues to show increasingly good results, 
with weekly and monthly inspections of certain sections of sewers that because of 
relatively flat slopes and low velocity cause plugging problems. 

The sewer division received $389.25 for special services performed during the 
past year and one half. 






Highways 



During the period January 1, 1976 through December 31, 1976, 47.81 miles of 
roads were treated with MC3 asphalt and sand as well as being honed. The follow- 
ing streets were resurfaced by the above mentioned: 



68 



Alderbrook Road 

An sway 

Ayer Street 

Ballardvale Rd. to Sunset Rock 

Bannister Road 

Birch Road 

Boston Road 

Brookfield Road 

Cabot Street 

Cedar Street 

Cheever Circle 

Clark Rd. (to Hall Ave) 

Coolidge Street 

CorbettSt. (from Rte 95 to 

Law. line) 
County Road 
Far end of Poor St . 

Fox Hill Road 

Gray Road 

Gould Road 

Harvard Road 

Holt Rd. to Bancroft Rd. 

Juliette Street 

Juniper Road 



Ledge Road 

Lincoln Street 

Linda Road 

Moreland Road 

Nancy Circle 

Pine Street 

Pinecrest Road 

Rattlesnake Road 

Rocky Hill Road 

Rockridge Road 

Sagamore Drive 

Salem Street 

Sequoia Lane 

Sheridan Road 

Shipman Road 

Suncrest Road 

Trench on Andover St. (Hall Ave to Dascomb 

Rd. ) 
Thresher Road 
Topping Road 
West Parish Drive 
William Street 
Woodcliff Road 
Wildwood Road 



69,668 gallons of asphalt (MC3) were utilized at a cost of $36,854.37; 3,104 
tons of sand and gravel at a cost of $14,280.18 equal to a total of $51,134.55. 

The following streets were resurfaced with a layer of Type I Bituminous 
Concrete: 

School Street 

Sweetbriar Lane 

Wildrose Drive (6/10th of area) 

2,369 tons of Bituminous Concrete was utilized at a cost of $37,904.00. 

Clean Up 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy cleaning the streets 
after the winter sanding. One sweeper starts each morning at 5:00 A.M. prior to 
the awakening of the business community. 

This past fall we had two leaf pickers removing leaves from the Town streets 
and they were taken to the Essex Gravel Pit for composting. Pick-up of leaves is 
a three-month project due to the no-burning law. 

Inspection 

The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division on its inspection of the 
conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed. 

Sidewalks 

Sidewalks were replaced with Bituminous Concrete at the following locations: 

Red Spring Road 

School St. (from Central St. down) 

Morton St. to Main St. - both sides 

Bartlett St. - Morton St. to Wheeler St. 

Summer Street 

Salem St. (500* on one side - 300' on opposite side) 



69 



The following projects were also completed: 

Andover Housing Authority - Morton St. (12 tons bituminous concrete used) 

Woburn St. - very bad bumps straightened out (20 tons used) 

Chandler Rd. - very bad ditch near the Andover Landfill (20 tons used) 

High Plain Rd. - bad water problem corrected 

River Rd. - large irregular bump corrected (12 tons used) 

The total amount expended was $4,900.35 from a budgeted amount of $5,000. 

Storm Drains 

Storm drains, brooks and catch basins were cleaned. Some 56 basins were 
repaired, deterioration and damage mostly caused by frost and ice conditions during 
the winter season. 

A basin was built at Juniper Road, approximately 60 feet. Work also being 
accomplished at Sagamore Drive - 300 feet of drainage. 110 feet also done on 
Forest Hill Drive. 

The Highway Division being also responsible for snow removal and ice control 
on all Town roads. 

The snow fall was as follows: 

1975 



January 9 inches 

February 19 inches 

March 3 . 5 inches 

December 32 inches 

1976 



January 9 inches 
December 17 inches 



Parks 



The park division during the early spring repairs and paints the benches, 
portable bleachers and back stops for all the baseball diamonds at the High School 
and the Little League fields. 

Three High School and ten Little League fields were raked, rolled and marked 
for each game. The running tracks and soccer fields are prepared for all the 
school meets. 

Portable bleachers are erected at the High School, Little League and Junior 
League baseball fields and for the Pee-Wee Football League. 

Fertilizer and seed, as needed, were applied in the spring and fall on all 
Town grassed areas, and over 65 acres of grass areas are cut each week during the 
growing season. 

Spraying was done, where required, to control infestation of Japanese Beetles. 

This year, 26 Town grass plot areas were mowed by private contractors during 
the growing season. 

In the fall, all necessary equipment is erected at the four school football 
fields and these fields are cleaned and marked for each game. 

70 



The Park personnel return to the Highway Division during the winter season for 
maintenance of highways and sidewalks and snow and ice control. 



Forestry 

Spraying 

In order to protect Town trees and comply with State requirements for Insect 
Pest Control and Dutch Elm Disease Control, the Forestry Division sprayed selected 
trees using pesticides and methods approved by State and Federal authorities. The 
spray program also included the summer inspection for diseased trees and insect 
infestations and winter inspections for signs of Gypsy Moth build-up. Although 
signs of Gypsy Moth infestation have not been seen in Andover for many years, the 
surveillance will continue in order to permit the division ample time to plan and 
prepare for a timely spray project if needed. Poison Ivy and selected roadside 
vegetation were treated with herbicides. 

Planting 

The Forestry Division continued its effort to plant replacement trees where 
space allowed, During the spring and fall planting sessions, a total of 141 trees 
were planted. The following are the varieties selected by the town for planting: 
Golden Chain Laburnum, Shademaster Locust, Column Norway Maple, Sugar Maple, Scar- 
let Oak, London Planetree, Florabunda Crabapple, American Elm, Ginko, Sweetgum, 
and Fastigiate English Oak. Other varieties were as follows: 

The division planted a White Flowering Dogwood at Roger's Dell for the Con- 
servation Commission and a Flowering Cherry in Central Park for the Andover Center 
Merchants. In the Fall of 1976, the division planted for the Andover Garden Club's 
Bicentennial many trees on the triangle at School and Central Streets. The plant- 
ing included Apple Serviceberry , Maackia Amur, Bradford Callery Pear, Washington 
Hawthorne, and Kousa Dogwood. 

Removals 

During the year the division removed 159 dead, dying, and dangerous trees. 
These trees range in size from 10" in diameter up to more than 30" in diameter. 
Whenever possible, the division pruned diseased, decayed, or dangerous portions of 
trees in order to preserve the trees. A total of 42 of the 159 removals were ac- 
complished with assistance from private contractors. 

Pruning 

During the year, the division spent 27% of its time pruning. Pruning con- 
sisted of street-by-street pruning, individual problem-tree pruning, flat-clearing 
whole streets of undesirable vegetation, removing site distance obstructions at 
intersections and curves, and storm clean-up. 

Hurricane Belle 

Monday, August 9, 1976, gave the Forestry Division and the whole town some 
anxious moments of preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Belle. Fortunately, 
Belle skirted the area and damage was minimal. Two days were required to clean up 
Belle's debris including the complete removal of a large White Ash on Summer St. 
near Elm St . 

The mowing of roadside weeds is done by private contractors and the division 
mows individual problem areas and some town-owned fields. During the winter months 
the division continues with its shade tree maintenance duties and also plows snow 
for the Highway Division when needed. 

71 



Mosquito Control 

In April 1976 the Town was sprayed with a contracted helicopter using a lar- 
vacide chemical. During June the Town was sprayed on eight nights with an adulti- 
cide chemical applied by Town equipment operated by Town employees. Since the 
1976 Town Meeting had voted to discontinue the Mosquito Control program, the pro- 
gram was halted following June 1976. 



Spring Grove Cemetery 



Spring Grove Cemetery is located in the southwesterly part of the Town with 
the principal entrance at the junction of Abbott Street and Spring Grove Road. 

The cemetery contains 60 acres of land, of which 14 acres are undeveloped. 
The area is developed to retain its natural beauty. Lots are available to meet 
requirements. 

Routine work consists of the following: interments, grounds and monuments 
maintenance, pruning of shrubs and trees, preparing new grave sites, repairs of old 
sites, installing foundations for monuments and lawn markers, snow and ice removal. 

During snowstorms, cemetery personnel operate trucks and plows for the High- 
way Division. 

During the 12 month period, there were 83 interments, and 42 new lots were 
sold. Total amount of moniew received was $19,646. This amount of money came 
from sale of lots, interments, foundations, annual care of lots, flower rings, and 
from placing annual care lots into Perpetual Care. These general receipts and the 
income from the Perpetual Care Fund were turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Lot layout and landscaping of a new section, which is called "Section M" has 
been completed; also all cemetery prices have been updated. 



Solid Waste 



The solid waste program consists of weekly curbside collections of combined 
refuse (rubbish and garbage) packaged by the homeowner in plastic bags. 

New contracts for collection and disposal of refuse were advertised for com- 
petitive bids and new contracts were awarded commencing July 1, 1976. South Shore 
Disposal, Inc., was awarded a three-year contract for once-a-week collection and 
disposal of residential refuse. Included in this contract was the collection and 
disposal of large and bulky items. The contractor elected to pick up one large 
and bulky item per household unit per week instead of once-a-month pick-up under 
the old contract. The contract also included the collection and disposal of 
town-owned receptacles. 

The cost of service per year for the next three years is $192,000, compared 
to $208,500 per year for the last three years, a reduction of $26,500 per year. 

The Town's recycling program continued with the signing of a one year contract 
with Bill's Trucking Co., Inc. to collect the recyclable materials once a week for 
an annual $27,500. 



72 



During the past twelve months the following quantity of recycling items was 
collected: 



ITEM 

Newspapers 

Glass 

Cans 

Mixed Metal 



AMOUNT 

850.8200 tons 

306.0270 tons 

98.2440 tons 

9.0800 tons 



RECEIPTS 

$14,986.13 

4,155.86 

1,804.56 

68.11 



TOTAL 1,264.1710 tons $21,014.66 

Collection costs for the calendar year were $26,250.00. 

Through the efforts of the Recycling Committee, a third auction was held at 
Recreation Park in April, 1976, with Philip K. Allen and Ralph Sharpe again acting 
as auctioneers. The proceeds of the auction added another $2,000.00 to the Town 
Treasury . 

The following is a summary of the recycling program as it is now being handled: 

FIRST FULL AND THIRD WEEKS (First full week means first week in month which 

starts on a Monday) 

PAPER 

1. Newspapers, magazines (only) 

2. Corrugated cardboard collapsed and tied 



SECOND WEEK 
FOURTH WEEK 

FIFTH WEEK 
INSTRUCTIONS 



CLEAR GLASS AND CANS - in same container 

COLORED GLASS AND CANS - green and brown glass and 

cans in the same container 

NO RECYCLABLE PICK UP 

1. Preparation: 

Cans and glass should be rinsed. Labels may be left on and 
cans do not need to be flattened. 



2. Curbs ide: 

All recyclables must be placed at curb by 8:00 a.m. in large 
double grovery bags or suitable permanent container on your 
regular trash day. 

3. Landfill: 

Bins for recyclable materials will also be available at the 
landfill for deposit of paper, corrugated, glass, cans, 
metal and tires. 

4. Large and bulky: 

One large bulky item may now be placed out weekly with 
regular trash. 

5. Auction: 

Save all useable items for spring recycling auction. All 
proceeds to town. 

NO COLLECTIONS of recyclables or rubbish on legal holidays. All collections 
will be made ONE DAY LATER THAT WEEK? 

The landfill on Chandler Road remains open on Wednesday afternoons and all day 
Saturday for the disposal of brush and recyclables. 



73 



G.L.R.V.T.H.S. 

INTRODUCTION 

The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
School is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to 
establish a Regional Vocational School District. Participating communities in the 
Region are the city of Lawrence and the towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen 

The content of the Annual Report under the terms of the Agreement is to con- 
tain a detailed financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current 
year. Further, it is required that for each budget period there be included a 
statement showing the method by which the annual charges assessed to each member 
community were computed. 

Lastly, along with statistical and financial data, the Regional School Com- 
mittee may add such additional information relating to the operation and mainte- 
nance of the regional school as deemed necessary or appropriate. 

REGULAR DAY SCHOOL 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1976 



GRADE 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


PG 


PG 


SPECIAL 




MUNICIPALITY 


















NEEDS 


TOTAL 


ANDOVER 


35 


28 


32 


18 


11 





1 





7 


132 


LAWRENCE 


354 


304 


282 


261 


27 


3 


21 


3 


6 


1,261 


METHUEN 


88 


98 


130 


123 


23 


2 


10 


1 


3 


478 


NORTH ANDOVER 


23 


21 


32 


10 


9 


1 


3 





3 


102 


TOTALS 


500 


451 


476 


412 


70 


6 


35 


4 


19 


1,973 



GRADUATES JUNE^ 1976 



GRADE 12 
GRADE 13 
GRADE 14 
POST GRADUATE 
L.P.N. 

TOTALS 



NUMBER 
RADUATED 


NUMBER 
PLACED 


OTHER 


ARMED 
SERVICES 


HIGHER 
EDUCATION 


409 


378 


14 


9 


8 


28 


22 








6 


8 


8 











20 


20 











37 


32 


5 





_0 


502 


460 


19 


9 


14 



74 



PGI 


TOTAL 





179 





29 











8 





216 



PUPIL SEPARATIONS JUKE, 1976 

GRADE 9 10 11 12 13 14 

TRANSFER 60 57 54 2 6 

EMPLOYMENT 9 8 8 3 1 

ARMED SERVICES 

MOVED OUT-OF-STATE _4 _4 _0 _0 

TOTALS 64 70 62 10 9 1 



DIFFERENTIAL APTITUDE TESTING 

All secondary and post graduate students applying for entrance to the 
vocational school are required to take the Differential Aptitude Test (DAT). 
The purpose of this test is to give Guidance personnel an indication of the 
student's potential to benefit from vocational and academic instruction. The 
total test is divided into eight sub-tests which form an integrated test battery. 
The major components of the test are Verbal Reasoning, Numerical Ability, Abstract 
Reasoning, Spacial Relationships, Mechanical Reasoning, Clerical Speed and Accuracy, 
Language Usage and Spelling. 

The use of the test results as an effective counseling instrument has spread 
to other school systems in the Region. At the present time a number of schools 
are testing all eighth grade students. The Vocational school cooperates with 
these schools by sharing test materials and in some instances provides supervision 
and direction at the test site. The test results become part of the student 
record file and can be used by the Vocational school should the student decide at 
any time to apply for admission. 

EVENING SCHOOL 

Evening School registrations maintained approximately the same level as the 
previous year. Total registrations numbered 2,370 students in the total evening 
program. 

EVENING SCHOOL PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES - 1975 



City or Town 


Male 


Female 


Lawrence 


511 


474 


Methuen 


345 


256 


North Andover 


109 


102 


Andover 


169 


146 


Massachusetts Non-Resident 


172 


35 


New Hampshire 


40 


11 


TOTAL 


1,346 


1,024 



75 



Male 


Female 


352 


46 


616 


292 


136 


492 


131 


194 


111 





1,346 


1,024 





EVENING SCHOOL PARTICIPATION BY PROGRAM - 1975 

Course 

Trade Extension 

Preparatory 

Evening Practical Arts 

Novice 

Apprentice 

TOTAL 

SUMMER SCHOOL - 1975 

The Summer School program followed the same general format as in previous 
years. Students could elect full vocational or full academic programs. The 
vocational curriculum offered both intensive study in one area or a career explora- 
tory program which allowed younger students to gain insight into a number of 
potential future career opportunities. The academic courses offered are princi- 
pally developmental or remedial curriculums in English and mathematics. 

Enrollment Statistics - 1975 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 

430 261 691 

INDUSTRIAL ENTRY 1975-76 

The Industrial Entry program is designed specifically for students in grades 
seven and eight. The course offerings and the curriculum are selected specifically 
to give the student a high level of activity and at the same time introduce the 
various trades and technologies of an industrialized society. 

Classes are conducted two days per week from October to April between the 
hours of 3:15 P.M. to 5:15 P.M. Course selection is left almost entirely up to 
the student, and each student is encouraged to enroll in at least three different 
courses during the year. 

Enrollment Statistics - 1975-76 

Male Female Total 

Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 
Andover 



ale 


Female 


Tota 


50 


27 


77 


202 


167 


369 


125 


49 


174 


53 


18 


71 



174 


121 


295 


79 


47 


126 


52 


29 


81 


52 


7 


59 



357 204 561 



AREA COORDINATOR OF OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 



The Area Coordinator of Occupational Education, based at the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School, has moved to create closer ties between 

76 



the Regional School and the school systems within the District by facilitating the 
growth of Career and Occupational Education. 

Specific projects undertaken by the Area Coordinator include an inservice 
training program in Occupational Education for Guidance Counselors, and a pilot 
program designed as an alternative approach to education for students who have 
left school prior to graduation. 

Operating as a consultant, the Area Coordinator has worked on both the 
administrative and teacher level in making innovative occupational curriculum 
available to the school systems. In this same direction the Area Coordinator 
has been instrumental in the design and implementation of an instructional material 
collaborative through which the school systems in the Region may share materials. 

The total scope of the Area Coordinator's activities includes contact with 
industry and all levels of teaching and school administration within the Region. 
The objective of this position is to bring together all of the elements which 
will promote the advancement of Career and Industrial Education for the students 
of the Region. 

ADVISORY BOARDS 

An important aspect of vocational-technical education is the establishment 
and maintenance of Advisory Boards to the various vocational departments within 
the school. Mandated by law, the Advisory Boards act only in an advisory manner 
in keeping the school informed as to the present status, growth potential, or 
current practices within a particular trade or technological discipline. 

During the past year, Advisory Board activity increased in most vocational 
areas by the election of new Advisory Board members, and the holding of meetings 
on a department-by-department basis. Advisory Board meetings are attended by the 
Department Chairmen, teachers within the department, and members of the adminis- 
trative staff. 

The subject matter at all Advisory Board meetings includes a complete review 
of the present curriculum with open' discussion on any pending or advised revisions. 
Present and future job placement potential is a further subject of discussion. 
Lastly, the Advisory Board and faculty members review equipment inventories and 
any requests by the department for new equipment. 

PLACEMENT/CURR I CULUM 

The school administration and the School Committee maintain an active watch 
on the job placement of seniors and graduating students. Senior students are 
eligible for job placement through the Cooperative Work Program during the school 
year. The rate of placement each year along with data on previous year's place- 
ment is a fairly reliable indicator as to the status of curriculum, training and 
the demand for graduates in specific vocational areas. 

During school year 1975-76, the curriculum and placement record of two voca- 
tional areas was reviewed. Through meetings with Advisory Board and contact with 
potential employers, it was found that job placement for graduates in both areas 
was presently very limited. Accordingly, the curriculum in both departments was 
updated to focus concentration on new subject matter which would lead to expanded 
job opportunities for graduates. 

COMMONWEALTH ATHLETIC CONFERENCE 

The Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School competes in 
athletics in the Commonwealth Athletic Conference. The league is composed mainly 
of regional vocational-technical high schools located in the northeastern section 
of Massachusetts. Greater Lawrence not only helped establish the league, but also 
has dominated league competition over the past few years. 



77 



Student participation in athletics and Conference play remains at a high 
level. During school year 1975-76, student participation in Fall sports numbered 
166; in Winter sports student participation numbered 233, and 221 students com- 
peted in Spring sports. Conference championships were earned in Football, Basket- 
ball, Girls' Basketball, Baseball, Track and Tennis. 

Total Contests Played - 1975-76: 

Season Varsity J.V. Frosh Total 

Fall 43 31 8 82 

Winter 89 47 17 153 



43 


31 


8 


89 


47 


17 


62 


18 


19 


194 


96 


44 



Spring _62 _18 _19 99 

TOTALS 194 96 44 334 

HOUSE BUILDING PROGRAM 

In a joint cooperative venture between the Greater Lawrence Revolving Loan 
Fund, Inc., and the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School, 
the first house building project was undertaken during school year 1975-76. 

The project, sponsored by the Loan Fund - a non-profit group organized by 
the Greater Lawrence Chamber of Commerce to assist with loan grants for down 
payments to low income families, was kicked off with groundbreaking in early 
October. The Loan Fund purchased the land and assumed complete financial responsi- 
bility for all bills incurred for the construction of the house. 

The house, designed and drawn by students of the Carpentry Department, is 
located at 51 Ayer Street, Methuen. It is a five room ranch with a garage and 
finished playroom in the basement. It contains 1-1/2 baths, modern kitchen with 
disposal and built-in appliances, a fireplace in the playroom, rotor operated 
T.V. antenna, smoke detectors, and a central forced warm air and air conditioning 
system. 

All school construction trades participated in building the house, involving 
upwards of 300 students from Air Conditioning, Carpentry, Electrical, Metal Fab- 
rication, Painting and Decorating, Pipefitting and Plumbing and the Plant Main- 
tenance Department. 

TITLE VII NUTRITION PROJECT 

The Merrimack Valley Title VII Nutrition Project is based at the Greater 
Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School. Serving the Senior Citizen 
population from Billerica to Newburyport, the Title VII Project utilizes the 
school facilities and student population for meal preparation, delivery, service 
and equipment maintenance. The Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical 
High School is the only school in the country engaged in the Title VII Project. 

During the Fiscal Year October 1, 1975 through September 30, 1976, the 
Merrimack Valley Title VII Nutrition Project reached its largest operating 
capacity since its inception in 1974. The Project was expanded to 16 meal sites 
and serviced 18 of the 23 communities in the Merrimack Valley Region. Congregate 
meal sites are located in the communities of: Lawrence (2 meal sites), Methuen 
(2 meal sites), Amesbury, Merrimac, Groveland, Haverhill, Newburyport, Billerica, 
Dracut, Lowell (2 meal sites), Tewksbury (2 meal sites) and Tyngsboro. 

During this period, 154,658 meals were served to elderly at the meal sites 
and 18,226 meals were served to elderly shut-ins in their homes. Nearly 3,500 
elderly benefited from the nutrition services during the period of this report. 



78 



Through agreements with the school and local community agencies, the Merri- 
mack Valley Title VII Project has been able to expand its supportive services. 
These services include transportation, health counseling, recreation, information 
and referral, and nutrition education. 

Over 40,000 units of supportive services were provided to Project participants 
during this fiscal year, 

COMPUTER SERVICES 

The school's IBM 1130 computer continues to be used by school systems within 
the Region to process student data. The major applications used by the senior 
and junior high schools are student scheduling, grade reporting, and quarterly 
attendance applications. Each school using the computer has a student master 
record file from which various reports may be generated as needed by the school. 
Depending upon the data placed in the master record file, individual schools can 
request grade lists, emergency information, street lists for bus routes, and mail- 
ing labels. 

A school census package is also available to each school system. The census 
program was written in the Regional School and fulfills present State of Massa- 
chusetts information requirements pertaining specifically to ethnic and special 
needs population figures. 

Further, a considerable amount of computer programming has already been done 
in order to provide each school system with the capability of using the computer 
to record and store school budget data. The complete implementation of this 
system might reasonably be expected to take place in stages over the next eighteen 
months. The main objective of this budget program would be to month by month 
systematically record expenditures and show monthly balances in each account. 
Year end reports would show gross expenditures by department and by function 
number depending upon the amount of detail entered by the school system. 

PUBLIC SERVICE PROJECTS 

During the course of any school year vocational departments perform many jobs 
and services for a number of community and municipal organizations. Although each 
job or service is generally not a major project, the sum total of all jobs and 
services adds up to a considerable contribution and commitment to public service 
on the part of the students and the school. 

It is not uncommon to find the metal working departments fabricating a hard 
to replace part for a piece of municipal equipment. The Allied Health Departments 
are constantly serving as aides and assistants at bloodmobiles and public health 
clinics. Students visit nursing homes and hospitals providing services, demon- 
strations and entertainment for the confined patients. The building trades are 
called upon to make various articles and fixtures for municipal offices and schools, 
or to repaint a suite of offices for a non-profit community organization. The 
Bicentennial Float, designed and built by students, was the combined work of many 
vocational departments. The students and teachers combined their talents to pro- 
duce a float which depicted the origin of the Region's textile industry and the 
costumes of the era. 

The benefits of such projects to the students and to the school are derived 
from involving the students in a variety of work experiences which expand the 
student's awareness of community and municipal organizations and the interaction 
of such organizations in the total life of the community. 

Public service projects also provide an opportunity for members of the 
communities to see first hand the practical applications of vocational training 
and education. 



79 



APPROVED BUDGET 



July 1, 1975 - June 30, 1976 



General Control 

Expense of Instruction 

Day School 2,540,165 

Evening School 145,514 

Total Expense of Instruction 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Cost of Transportation 

Operation of Plant 

Maintenance of Plant 

Special Charges 

Miscellaneous 

Outlay 

Debt Retirement and Service 
Grand Total 



$ 130,982 



2,685,679 

177,330 

230,481 

485,401 

234,097 

148,556 

64,572 

76,479 

578,740 

$ 4,812 317 



Funds for Reduction: 



School Building Assistance Bureau 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 

P.L. 90-576 

P.L. 81-874 

Chapter 791 

Other Funds 

Equipment Replacement Fund 

FY 75 Contingency Account 

Chapter 71 Section 16D 

Total Funds for Reduction 

NET TOTAL 

BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



$ 276,919 

108,838 

33,053 

5,202 

1,673,098 

166,484 

33,077 

50,000 

527,467 

$ 2,874,138 

$ 1,938,179 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 



Total Payment 

124,595.70 

1,176,848.52 

534,951.62 

101,783.16 



1 Aug. 75 
Payment 

39,626.64 
294,212.13 
170,134.45 

25,445.79 



1 Dec. 75 

1 Apr. 76 

Each Payment 

28,323.02 
294,212.13 
121,605.73 

25,445.79 



1 June 75 
Payment 

28,323.02 
294,212.13 
121,605.71 

25,445.79 



* Revised August 14, 1975 per Regional School District Aid under the Provisions 
of Chapter 71 Section 16D as amended. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 
July 1976 
FY 76 Ending Balances 



School Funds : 

Athletic 

Cafeteria 

Construction 

Work Study 

General Fund 

PL 90-576 (Construction Reimbursement) 

TOTALS 



NET CASH POSITION : 

$ 85.04 

11,125.40 

1,700.35 

580.97 

1,013,770.21* 

28,500.00 

$1,055,761.97 



80 



FEDERAL PROGRAMS. .. .FISCAL CUSTODIAN OF FUNDS: 

P.L. 90-576 Special Account 

CEDIS 

Mass. Advisory Council 

Title VII, Meals for the Elderly 

Greater Lawrence Special Needs (Collaborative) 

MDTA 

Mass. Vocational Student Organizations 

Mass. Advisory Council-Guidance Project 

House Building Fund 

TOTALS 

GRAND TOTAL 



$ 14,827.14 

76,079.84 

34,828.94 

23,153.40 

9,668.95 

40.00 

64,727.61 

17,149.85 

547.00 

$ 241,022.73 

$1,296,784.70 



The $1,013,770.21 in the school's General Fund represents that portion of 
the $2,849,850 "Funds for Reduction for FY 77" received to date. This 
leaves an outstanding balance of $1,836,079.79 for Funds for Reduction. 
This balance is outstanding from anticipated State and Federal funding. 

APPROVED BUDGET 



July 1, 1976 - June 30, 1977 



General Control 

Expense of Instruction 

Day School 2,739,062 

Evening School 143,324 

Total Expense of Instruction 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Cost of Transportation 

Operation of Plant 

Maintenance of Plant 

Special Charges 

Miscellaneous 

Outlay 

Debt Retirement and Service 
GRAND TOTAL 

Funds for Reduction: 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 

P.L. 90-576 

P.L. 81-874 

Chapter 791 

Other Funds 

Chapter 71 Section 16D Funds 

Contingency Fund FY 76 

Total Funds for Reduction 

NET TOTAL 



$ 136,097 



2,882,386 
173,262 

onn son 



200,580 
96,711 
172,660 
112,316 
83,500 



125,689 

56 7,320 

$5,150 521 



$ 309,065 

188,849 

28,500 

9,797 

1,633,969 

124,357 

505,313 

50,000 

$2,849,850 

$2,300,671 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 



BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 

3 1 

Total Payment Payment Payment 



153,259.48 

1,412,507.32 

617,826.07 

117,078.13 



38,314.87 
353,126.83 
154,456.52 

29,269.53 



38,314.87 
353,126.83 
154,456.51 

29,269.54 



81 






c 
a 

rH 

a 

ca 





VI 




0) 




U 




3 


rH 


4-> 


ci 


•H 


P 73 





C 


H 







a 




« 




w 



TJ 


to 





p u 


4-> 


a! 


to 


bflpH 


3 T5 rH 


•1-5 


3 


-a CQ Q 


< 





CO 
Ol 



O 
Pn 

I 

W 
OS 

FH 
w 
o 



pa 



en 




co 


w 


c 


c 











SH 





■H 


tO 


5* P 


G 


p 


o 


rt 





c 


U CQ 


3 


H 




f=H 





to 




p 





c 


3 





C 


s 





p 


> 


to 





3 


cs 


■n 




TJ 




< 





CO 


P 


^ 





a 


bflrH 


T3 


pH 


3 





CQ Q 





t^ 




in 


in 






pH 






00 




in 




CM 


CO 






r> 






00 


1 


• 


1 


• 


• 


i 


1 


• 


i 


1 


• 


o 
1 


00 

o 
o 


o 
1 


m 

rH 

CO 

CI 

m 


CO 

o 

00 
CO 


o 
1 


O 
1 


pH 
pH 
O 

m 
m 


o 
i 


o 

1 


CM 

pH 
CO 

•\ 

CM 
CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 


o 


m 


m 


CM 


rH 


o 


t> 


o 


pH 


CO 


o 


co 


r> 


CO 


CO 


■<* 


CM 


pH 


o 


o 


^ 


CM 


CM 


m 


Tf 


00 


CO 


O 


CO 


o 


■* 


en 


oo 


00 


CO 


05 


<N 


Tt< 


CO 


00 


■<*< 


r> 


■<* 


00 


00 


00 


m 


o 


■* 


m 


■* 


o 


N 


•^ 


o 


r> 


o 


00 


CO 


m 


CI 


CI 


m 


in 


CO 


CI 


r> 


t> 


CO 


CO 


t> 




r> 


00 


CM 


pH 


CXI 


rH 


rH 


■* 


CM 


pH 






m 


m 


CM 


o 


t^ 


o 


o 


CM 


pH 


o 


r> 


o 


CI 


CO 


CO 


co 


o 


o 


CO 


■* 


o 


rH 


o 


t> 


■^ 


pH 


eg 


rH 


rH 


00 


CO 


CM 


CO 


o 


t^ 


CI 


CO 


00 


oo 


O 


CM 


^ 


r> 


00 


•<* 


oo 


-# 


t> 


00 


■* 


■* 


O 


HH 


m 


■<* 


o 


m 


Tf 


pH 


!> 


o 


m 


CO 


in 


•* 


CI 


m 


r> 


CO 


01 


t> 


CO 


00 


CO 


i> 


co 


r> 


00 


00 


rH 


lO 

cvT 


rH 


CM 


■^ 


CN 


pH 






m 




CM 


Gl 


t> 






CM 


pH 




r> 


o 




CO 


iH 


CO 






CO 


Tj< 




pH 


o 




• 


• 


• 






• 


• 




• 


• 


1 


CM 


00 


CM 






pH 


r> 




HH 


o 


O 


pH 


00 


in 






CO 


oo 




o 


o 


1 


m 


pH 


m 






01 


oo 




o 


CO 




•s 


•s 








•V 


*\ 




as 


at 




CO 


CI 
CO 

/-s 
rH 
CM 

Ol 
(M 
t> 

Tt< 
CM 








oo 

CM 


CO 
CM 




CO 


CO 


H 
CM 

01 
CM 
t> 

CM 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CI 


o 


rH 


rH 


l> 


CO 


CM 


CI 


o 


t> 


00 


t> 


CO 


00 


O 


•CI 


m 


t> 


t- 


■* 


pH 


CI 


CO 


CO 


<* 


■* 


o 


m 


in 


■* 


i> 


CO 


o 


m 


t^ 


o 


m 


■* 


00 


■* 


CO 


00 


CM 


CO 


oo 


r> 


CO 


00 


CO 


•* 


CO 


I> 


t*. 


pH 


rH 


CO 

•s 

CM 


rH 


CM 


rt< 


CM 


pH 






m 


00 

<* 











C 


















pH 

















CO 






P 




o 








•H 




<H 











c 




u 


c 


to 




P 




o 




bD 


to 









P 


o 







a 


<H 






u 


3 




e o 




c 


■H 


•H 




p 










a 


O 




-H 


CO 


o 


<H P 


o 




u 









s: 







U > 


kJ 


u 


o o 


c 




o 


c 


c 




o 


3 




•H ^ 


< 




3 







a 


o 


a 






d 




P 


H 


r-{ 


u 


M 


«H 


to 


•H P 


c 


p 


pH 


pH 




Cfl 


O 


a 


CO P 


< 





c 


+J c 





c 


a 


pH 


>> 


03 


H 


u 


a co 






a 


a a 


■p 


a 


•H 





a 


■o 







c 


• 


■p 


u 


*■" & 


c 


r-i 


o 





pH 


P c 




c 


ai-H 


X 


to H 


0< 


•H 


Uk 





CO 


P 


.Q cci 







X 


3 


O 




a 


a 




a 


•H 


3 







o 


H 


< 


O 




o 


s 




CO 


S 


O 


Q 





82 



CO 














CD 


l> 








t> 


05 








05 


rH 








r-( 


H 


CO O l> 


o 


CO CO 


o 


CM O 


■* 


rH 


CO 


(ooco 


o 


00 CO 


CM 


Ol O 


CO 


CO 




• • • 


• 


• • 


• 


• • 


• 




u 


mo'* 


o 


cm m 


O 


05 I> 


rH 


u 


CD 


m o <* 


o 


co m 


o 


rH CO 


05 


0) (D 


a 


HO00 


o 


t> m 


CM 


CD ^ 


m 


O X2 


e 


.... X 


•> 


.. 


•. 


•> 


~ 


G £ 


0) 


t> o m 


CO 


-tf 


<tf 


O 


CM 


rt 0) 





H CO •* 


Oi 






H 




H O 


0) 














rt a) 


Q 


#5- 


^ 


. *& 


€6- 


0* 


^ 


a q 



rH00O05rHCMinC0rHTr 
rHCMOmOOOt>lMt> 



■^cDOcMcooicomcom 

CMCMO^COC75in05^t> 
^rHOrHCOrHCOmrHCO 



rH rH CM O rH 



m 



a 
o 
o 

a 
o 

CO 

a 
a 
a 

feCO 

i> 

Q 05 

< 
a - 

O rH 
!5 CO 

a a 
a 
a a 
a s 
h a 
o 
a a 
o p 



CO O 

a a 
a m 

H Q 

co a 

a a 
a 

< 
a a 
a >* 

a 

a a 

O H 

^ 9a 
a o 
o a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
<: 

o 

a 

a 

M 

a 



g 

rH 

a 

> 

+-> 

•H 44 

tfl O 

o o 

aa 
o> 
p p 



o u a 



CO 






t> 




05 




rH 






co o t> 


o 




co o co 


o 


rH 


• • • 


• 




o o o> 


o 


>> 


I> O CM 


o 


!H 


rH O CO 


o 


rt 


•*•%•* 




3 


t> o m 


CO 


G 


co m 


o> 


rt 






•"3 


^ 


m 



g p 
a a 
a s 



n a) 
o 

bfl G 

G a 

H rH 

g a 



X! u 

to co 

a o 

o a 



co o 

CD CM 

CD CD 
t> CO 

CO CO 



ta- 



ct p 

g PI 



3 rH 

cr o 
o 
a 



I rH £ 



o cc a 

" 3 
O 
0) 



CO 



T3 W 
0) 

O en 

tfl -H 

0) ?-( 

[0 d) 

G p fn 0) 

0) rt O O 

as «h a] 

x -h 

a s 



bD g 

•H OS 
a rH 



CO 
CO 


O CD 
O l> 


CD 


• 


• • 


• 


CM 
CD 
l> 


CM CD 

Tf O 
CO o 


CO 
CD 


»\ 


•\ #1 


•. 


"<* 


m co 


CO 
rH 


«0- 


&■ 


m- 



CD 
















3 
















r-{ 
















Ct 
















> 
















P 
















•H X 
















tfl 












tn 

















T3 




aa 












G 




0) 






T3 






<U 




P P rH 




(U r-i 




TJ 


rH 


A 


rt 




> 


CS 




•H 


ct! 


«H 


p 




•H 


P 




> 


P 


tfl o to 





tfl 


0) 


o 




■H 


o 


X CD H 


X 


o 


H 




P 


Eh 


G <D P 




c 


CD 










rt P 




d ps; 






08 




a «s a 




a 












O 






P 






P 




G -H d8 




G 


CO 




<1) 


tfl 




•H <4H 




•H 


0) 




O 


0) 




•H tfl 






u 




G 


!h 




,G -P T3 




a 


0) 




etf 







tfl Sh G 




to 


p 




rH 


P 




rt CD 




rt 


G 




rt 


G 




o o a 




CJ 


hH 




a 


M 





tfl 


O 


o o o o 


o o 


T3 


o 


o o o o 


o o 


fH 


1 • 


.... 


• • 


C3 


1 o 


o o o o 


o o 


^ 


•^ 


CO CD m rH 


CO CM 


< 




CO t- rH 





a* 



HCOOOlHCMincOrH'HH 
rHCMOinOOOI>CMt> 

TPcoocMcooicDincoin 

CMCOOCMC5^C005lM05 
"tfrHOCMClClt^mCMCO 



rH rH CM O rH 



<& 



cocoo^cocMOcncoin 

05CDinC0C0OOCDt>C0 

coNt-ooooiMnom 

COOO^fCOt-^O^COCM 

CM r4 tfi <5) i-K H 

#3- 



cocMomcoom^co^ 

HHOCSHOOO^CO 



CD >> 

<J U 

G rt 

rt G 

<-i G 

a »-5 



mcooHt>oc350cMm 

COC0005rHOCDin05CO 

h oomomiooco 



rH rH CM O rH 



£0- 



T3 







m a -a 


£1 tfl 


£« en 


G 


P ^ 


G a 





■HOC 


u o a 


e p o 


rt 




*h tn p tfl 


a i 
i 




0> T3 G !h 
G an O 


• 




Hrl (1) a o P 


a t3 




r-i Oti-i Vl O • +» 


• fH 




Q) d >>P Eh 3 


S rt 




a a o • o 


G 




OP • O J3 


T3 ^| 




a p • 


G rt 




s • • a do 


c« a 




O ^ G rt X5 
CO CP -H rt G 


• • 




OH'OhHNO 


&S&S 




•H G ?H rH -H in 






rH 73 ^1 CS -H rH >> 


a' ^ 




< w a ^ ^ a s 



83 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
JURY LIST - JUNE 1976 



Abdoo, Mitchell E. 
Adami, Arthur 
Adler, Elinor R. 
Adornato, Joseph V. 
Ainscow, George W. 
Allen, Charles F. 
Anderson, Louis 
Anderson, Marguerite A. 
Anderson, Marie F. 
Anderson, Mary L. 
Arsenault, Raymond 
Athanasopoulos, Alexander 
Auchterlonie, Robert L. 
Bailey, Francis W. 
Bajek, Mat hew B. 
Ball, Ed K. 
Bangert , John T. 
Barnwell, John C. Ill 
Barraclough, Norman 
Barrett, Lucille 
Barron, Thomas L. 
Batson, J. E. David Jr. 
Baun, Philip J. Jr. 
Bayliss, Frank B. 
Beanland, Agnes C. 
Beanland, John E. 
Beebe, Stephen 
Belisle, Donald 
Birnbach, Bernice 
Benson, Daniel 
Benson, Evelyn M. 
Berry, Albert F. 
Bissett, James 
Black, Charles P. 
Bobek, William J. 
Bolduc, Joseph R. 
Bottomley, Jean A. 
Bourque, Raymond 
Bovay, Carl E. 
Bramley, Edwin L. 
Brennan, John C. 
Brilliant, Alice 
Broderick, Helen T. 
Broscoe, Jeannette 
Brunquell, Clyde H. 
Burgess, Jordan J. 
Burns, Mildred F. 
Buschmann, Ralph E. 
Cady, Edith M. 
Campbell, Collin R. 
Carmichael, James G. 



Chemical Mixer 

Engineering Manager 

Housewife 

Insurance Agent 

Engineering Assoc. 

President 

Reg. Manager 

Companion * 

Housewife 

Asst . Librarian 

Layout -Operator 

Manager 

Machinist 

Engineer 

Carpet Salesman 

Computer Typesetting 

Communication Engineer 

Computer Programmer 

Administrative Asst. 

Unemployed 

Transportation 

Dept. Chief 

Elect. Engineer 

Quality Inspector 

Cutting Room Worker 

Tax Examiner 

Marketing Accounting Mgr, 

Self-Employed Pool Co. 

Legal Secretary 

Superintendent 

Data Transcriber 

Marketing Manager 

Groundskeeper 

Student 

Journeyman Plumber 

Postal Clerk 

Store Manager 

Supervisor 

Director Boy Scouts 

Retired 

Asst. Sales Mgr. 

Housewife 

Insurance Clerk 

Executive Secretary 

Senior Engineer 

Bank Officer 

Assembly Work 

Plant Manager 

Part-time Secretary 

Contract Administrator 

Sales Manager 



25 Enmore Street 

4 Athena Circle 

13 Charlotte Drive 
63 Harold Parker Road 
59 Lovejoy Road 
13 Geneva Road 
16 Lovejoy Road 
3 Wolcott Avenue 
40 Linwood Street 
16 Lovejoy Road 

9 Ayer Street 

2 Tanglewood Way North 
21 Hall Avenue 

36 Westwind Road 
82 Greenwood Road 
24 Launching Road 
75 Dascomb Road 
89 Cross Street 
16 Arcadia Road 
15 Pinecrest Road 
430 Lowell Street 

13 Stevens Circle 

14 Lockway Road 

35 Washington Avenue 

29A Maple Avenue 

120 North Main Street 

14 Kathleen Drive 
236 Chandler Road 
2 Bellevue Road 
33 Dufton Road 

6 Westwind Road 

15 Glen Meadow Road 
112 North Main Street 
Crescent Dr. Bldg. 10 

7 Locke Street 

14 Brechin Terr. 
19 Argilla Road 
192 Beacon Street 
134 Main Street 

15 Appletree Lane 
30 Fox Hill Road 
27 Bateson Drive 

37 Enmore Street 

16 Morton Street 

7 Millstone Circle 
16 Canterbury Street 
153 Andover Street 
44 Dascomb Road 

5 Shipman Road 

10 Carisbrooke Street 
59 Whittier Street 



84 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Carmichael, Thelma 
Carr, Sherman E. 
Caswell, Helen E. 
Cataldo, Charles C. 
Cervone, Peter M. 
Cheetham, Daniel L. 
Ciocca, Dorothy 
Cohen, Elizabeth N. 
Collins, B. Andrea 
Connolly, Edmond 
Cook, Emily C. 
Cookson, Harold T. 
Copeland, Allen B. 
Coppeta, Paul J. 
Crane, Virginia R. 
Critchlow, George 
Cronan, William M. 
Cronin, William J. 
Cross, Jerome W. 
Chiarenza, Alfred A. 
Costello, Phillip A. 
Crossley, John F. 
Croteau, Irene 
Cushing, Richard H. 
Cutler, Barbara 
D'Amelio, Anthony D. 
Daleske, Bernard L. Jr. 
Daniels, Richard W. 
Darling, Richard H. 
Dauber, Barbara A. 
Davis, Geoffrey S. 
Dearborn, Gertrude M. 
DeBruychere, Francis J. 
Demers, Roland J. 
Deneu, Frank P. 
Denicola, Richard 0. 
Dennison, Kenneth F. 
Dennison, Pauline R. 
Denoncourt, William R. 
Desrocher, Edward C. 
DesRoches, Robert F. 
Domasinsky, Joseph G. 
Dana, Joseph K. 
Doyle, William A. 
Drazy, Elbert J. 
Drew, Lester A. 
Duf ault , Arthur 
Dye , Thomas J . 
Earnshaw, Donald G. 
Eckman, Alfred B. 
Edwards, Allan E. 
Elder, Robert W. 
Elmi, Stelio J. 
Emmons, Francis C. Jr. 
Faggiano, Alphonse J. 
Faris, George S. 
Farnham, Robert H. 
Farrar, Virginia C. 



Part-time Sales Clerk 

Accountant 

Housewife 

Unemployed 

Planning & Engr . Specialist 

Laboratory Supervisor 

Housewife 

Real Estate Broker 

Exec. Secretary 

Sales & Service Mgr. 

Travel Agent 

Sales Representative 

Unemployed 

Engineering Tech. 

Housewife 

Electrical Engineer 

Chief Engineer 

Retired 

Bookstore Owner 

President 

Director of Library 

Instrument Tech. 

Secretary /Bookkeeper 

Maintenance Electrician 

Inspection-Group Leader 

Vice President 

Executive Asst . 

Electrical Engineer 

Mechanical Engineer 

Housewife 

Personnel Manager 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Layout Operator 

Supervisor 

Engineering 

Professional Engineer 

Senior Bank Clerk 

Department Chief 

Maintainance 

Vice President 

Mailer 

Purchasing Manager 

Manufacturing Staff 

Supervisor 

Custodian 

Pressman-Printing 

Sales Representative 

Supervisor 

President 

Asst. Super. 

Administrator 

Project Chemist 

Civil Engineer 

Asst. Comptroller 

Mechanic 

Superintendent 

Housewife 



59 Whittier Street 
13 Arundel Street 

5 Dumbarton Street 
12 Bowdoin Street 
15 Russett Lane 

23 Dufton Road 

4 Olde Berry Road 

4 Archer Lane 

B-3 Colonial Drive 
66 High Street 
8 Karlton Circle 
197 River Road 
65 Dascomb Road 

10 Essex Street 

7 Argyle Street 
53 Cross Street 

20 Korinthian Way 

8 Punchard Avenue 
59 Central Street 

12 Carisbrooke Street 
1 Appletree Lane 

35 Rocky Hill Road 
180 Beacon Street 
22 Arthur Road 

36 Elm Street 

1 Prides Circle 

2 Carmel Road 

12 Marion Avenue 

11 Enfield Drive 
19 Balmoral Street 
8 Dumbarton Street 

13 Farrwood Drive 
45 Union Street 

6 Ferndale Avenue 
40 Chandler Road 

3 Exeter Way 
112 Pine Street 
83 High Street 

11 Marion Avenue 

21 Florence Street 

24 Bannister Road 
125 North Main Street 

12 Abbot Bridge Drive 

11 Westwind Road 
6 Amherst Road 
300 High Street 
6 Cuba Street 

25 Smithshire Est . 
99 Lowell Street 
27 Sagamore Drive 

88 Rattlesnake Hill Road 
68 Love joy Road 

5 Abbot Bridge Drive 

12 Henderson Avenue 
2 Shipman Road 

36 Dufton Road 

122 Chestnut Street 

4 Hidden Road 



85 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Fee, Samuel S. 
Fernandes , Anthony D. 
Ferrier, Robert L. 
Fettes, Joan M. 
Finnagan, Richard 
Fitzgerald, Frederick P. 
Fitzgerald, Jeremiah J. 
Fitzpatrick, John P. 
Fleming, David A. Jr. 
Foley, Walter R. 
Fortier, John J. 
Frank, Francis A. 
Fraser, Ellen F. 
Fredrickson, Bertha E. 
Fredrickson, Robert A. 
Galvin, Walter R. 
Garabedian, Souren M. 
Garvey, Richard J. 
Gaudette, George C. 
Gaunt, Charles S. 
Gerraughty, James V. Jr. 
Giaimo, Ignatius S. 
Gilmore, James J. 
Goddard, Harold C. Jr. 
Gonzales, Roman Y. 
Gordon, Katherine M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Gorton, William G. Jr. 
Gottfried, Salomon 
Gower , Bruce H. 
Grange, Robert D. 
Grant, George A. 
Gravell, Mary R. 
Gray, Harrison F. 
Green, Gerard K. 
Green, Sybil S. 
Greenwood, Robert E. 
Griswold, Donald M. 
Guerrera, Jeannette D. 
Guillet, Arthur 0. 
Guinan, Alyce N. 
Guittarr, Ronald E. 
Gulezian, Vahey S. 
Hackett, William T. 
Haddad, William A. Jr. 
Haller, Harold 
Hannan, Laurence J. Jr. 
Hansen, Edwin B. Jr. 
Hardy, John F. 
Harriman, Wayne 
Harris, Alice R. 
Harris, Don S. 
Harvey, Frederick C. Ill 
Haskard, Dorothy S. 
Holdsworth, Gordon H. 
Halbach, Eric 
Haslam, Robert T. 
Hatch, George F. 



Rubber Worker-Leader 

Textile Engineer 

Electrician 

Underwriting Clerk 

Food Stamp Coordinator 

Salesman 

Accounting Tech. 

President Bank 

Contracts Administrator 

Senior Engineer 

Sales Manager 

Computer Consultant 

Housewife 

Clerk/Bookkeeper 

Asst . Art Director 

Asst . Supervisor 

Banking 

Retired 

Layout Operator 

Asst. Comptroller 

President & Treasurer 

Tax Examiner 

President 

Cost Accountant 

Senior Designer 

Housewife 

Retired 

Financial Analyst 

Retired 

Sales Representative 

Manager 

Land Surveyor 

Housewife 

Retired 

Sales Representative 

Housewife 

Toolmaker 

Toolmaker 

Writer 

Toolmaker 

Housewife 

Manager Administration 

Elect. Engineer 

Bookkeeper 

Systems Manager 

Retired 

Lab. Technician 

Salesmanager 

Project Manager 

Electrical Helper 

Housewife 

Purchasing Mgr . 

Sr. Quality Control Tech, 

At Home 

Project Technician 

Planning Engineer 

Sr. Public Relation 

Retired 



7 Buxton Court 
5 Glen Meadow Road 
249 Andover Street 
5 Buxton Court 

3 Cuba Street 

95 Central Street 
38 Juliette Street 

24 Bellevue Road 
14 Elysian Drive 

25 Bradley Road 

7 Henderson Avenue 

9 Stratford Road 

29 Boutwell Road 

1 Arrowood Lane 
16 Arundel Street 

10 Chapman Avenue 

26 Candlewood Drive 

37 Fox Hill Road 
117 Greenwood Road 

2 Beech Circle 

30 Bannister Road 

38 Osgood Street 
109 Dascomb Road 
59 Shawsheen Road 
123 Haverhill Street 
60C Washington Park Dr. 
60C Washington Park Dr. 
5 Woburn Street 

27 Theodore Avenue 
13 Argyle Street 

9 Tanglewood Way South 
19 Harding Street 

4 Charlotte Drive 
442 Lowell Street 
12 Avon Street 

11 Chandler Road 
62 Stevens Street 
4 Dumbarton Street 

28 Cuba Street 

28 Maple Avenue 
45 Abbot Street 
16 Shaw Drive 

10 Arthur Road 

29 Stinson Road 
220 Greenwood Road 
2 Kenilworth Street 
51 Whittier Street 

12 Vine Street 
1 Beech Circle 

192 North Main Street 
311 South Main Street 

11 Sherry Drive 

1 Reservation Road 
4 Lansbury Lane 
7 Howell Drive 
147 Summer Street 
116 Dascomb Road 
Pinetree Lane 



86 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Hayes, Charles E. 
Healy, George 
Hebert, Frank A. 
Hoffman, Joseph W. 
Hoffman, S. Joseph 
Holland, Robert C. 
Holt, Henry G. Jr. 
Horan , John V. 
Hudgins, Norman D. 
Hughes, Walter P. 
Ippolito, Esther C. 
Jacques, Henry E. Jr. 
Jako, Gaspar 
Jarvis, Arthur B. 
Jensen, Richard A. 
Johnson, Jane W. 
Kelly, John 
Kern, David L. 
King, Paul K. 
Kinsella, Marcelle C. 
Klie, Robert H. 
Hayes, Ruth 
Koromhas, William 
Kothman, Francis A. Jr. 
Kramer, Donald J. 
Kruse, Anne G. 
Krull, Betty A. 
Landry, Ernest J. 
Lansdowne, Kenneth H. 
LaRoche, Jeannette T. 
Lasota, Walter J. 
Lavin , Marie E. 
Lawrence, Cornelia F. 
Lawson , Sheryl E. 
Lehnert , Harry G. Jr. 
Lelacheur, Francis A. 
Lenes, Robert J. 
Lenk, Bernadette 
Lenk, Elmer N. 
Leone, William J. 
Levin, Morton P. 
Liou, Ming Lei 
Lloyd, Raymond H. 
Locke, Benjamin W. 
Look, Robert E. 
Loosigian, Suren 
Lounsbury, Alan E. 
Low, Thomas W. 
Lowe, Margaret B. 
Lucy, Marguerite M. 
Lundgren, Donald E. 
MacDougall, John L. 
MacDougall, Ruth M. 
MacKenzie, Earl Jr. 
Mackie, Vernon 
Manock, Mary 
Marotta, George J. 
Marjerison, Thomas S. Jr. 



Retired 

Sr. Management Analyst 

Pipe Fitter 

Contractor 

Executive Vice-President 

Purchasing Agent 

Manager 

Staff Asst. 

Engineer 

Consultant - Bank 

Homemaker 

Quality Control Analyst 

Social Work/Director 

Engineer 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife 

Inspector, Q. C. 

Plant Manager 

Account Administrator 

Records Clerk 

Elect . Engineer 

Volunteer 

Project Engineer 

Equipment Editor 

President 

Housewife 

Asst . Manager 

Sr. Engineer 

Electronic Engineer 

Order Checker 

Director, Tax Processing 

Homemaker 

Utility worker 

Assembler 

Office Manager 

Registered Pharmacist 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Treasurer/Furniture Store 

Unemployed 

Electrical Engineer 

Sales Manager 

Machinist 

Real Estate Broker 

Brake Operator 

Jr. Project Coordinator 

Production Control 

Clerk 

At Home 

Funeral Director 

Messenger 

Inspector 

Purchasing Manager 

Sr. Administrator 

Homemaker 

Department Chief 

Office Manager 



90 Cheever Circle 
126 Lowell Street 
31 Bannister Road 
57 Marilyn Drive 
28 Hidden Way 
211 Chestnut St. 
9 Canterbury Street 

7 Dartmouth Road 

18 Webster Street 
13 Lockway Road 

19 Bradley Road 

76 Haverhill Street 
4 Chickering Court 
215 Greenwood Road 
15 Enfield Drive 

4 Applecrest Road 
124 Main Street 
34 Enmore Street 
33 High Street 

37 Balmoral Street 

40B Washington Park Dr, 
28 Phillips Street 
9 Abbot Bridge Drive 
23 Central Street 
15 Partridge Hill Rd . 
12 Arcadia Road 

55 Greenwood Road 

8 Dufton Road 

162 High Plain Road 

90 Chandler Road 

2 Hanson Road 

9 Robandy Road 

23 Moraine Street 
8 Avon Street 

53 Brookfield Road 
8 High Street 

3 Hackney Circle 
3 Phaeton Circle 
3 Phaeton Circle 

38 Canterbury Street 
15 Candlewood Drive 

5 Wagon Wheel Road 
Crescent Dr. Bldg. 9 
189 Highland Road 

19 Kirkland Drive 
3 Blanchard Street 

24 Arundel Street 

5 Maple Court 

6 Sutherland Street 
149 Chestnut Street 
18 Elm Street 

39 McKenney Circle 
39 McKenney Circle 
15 Crestwood Drive 
Crescent Dr. Bldg. 10 

56 Summer Street 

91 Argilla Road 
87 Burnham Road 



87 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Marland, Robert E. 
Marshall, Karl L. 
Marvin, Harold A. 
Mason, Robert F. 
Mattei, Robert C. 
May, Catherine G. 
McAllister, John B. 
McDaniel, Richard A. 
McDonald, Walter F. 
McGrath, Harold E. 
McCarthy, John W. Jr, 
McGrath, John M. 
Mclntyre, Louis J. 
McKeon , John J. 
McNulty, Joanna M. 
Meisner, Gloria M. 
Metcalf, Paul T. II 
Mickevich, Paul F. 
Miller, Kenneth E. 
Milligan, Charles E. 
Milne, Rosemarie 
Mitchell, Thomas L. 
Mitchener, Paul E. 
Mooney, William F. 
Moorhead, David F. 
Moriarty, Wilfred D. 
Miller, Alwyne C. 
Moore, Howard F. 
Moritz, Seymour I. 
Morris, Richard J. 
Moss, George M. 
Murphy, Mary L. 
Murphy, Maurice J. 
Murphy, Veronica T. 
Nannis, Sybil A. 
Nichols, Robert M. 
Newhouse , Ellen R. 
Newton, Wayne 0. 
Northey, Helen L. 
O'Dowd, Joanne M. 
Oelwang, Robert C. 
Oliver, Peter L. 
Olsson, Robert J. 
Orlando, Frank J. 
Packard, Leslie 
Paladino, Lorraine C. 
Palermo, Linda 
Parson, Esther M. 
Patterson, Mark A. 
Pearson, Jack C. 
Peck, Marvin J. 
Pelc, Joseph I. 
Perry, Virginia M. 
Petrie, David R. 
Pierson, Victor 
Pike, Helen 
Plonowski, Edward T. 
Ploussios, George 
Poulin, Donald J. 



Retired 

Administration Service 

Foundry Owner 

Maintenance Tech. 

Bartender 

Retired 

Sales Clerk 

Manager 

Oil Sales 

Receiver-Expediter 

Treasurer 

Field Engineering Rep. 

Security Guard 

Millwright 

Housewife /Clerk 

Housewife 

Draftsman 

Group Leader 

Industrial Engineer 

Retired 

Retired 

Marketing Manager 

Vice-President Sales 

Civil Engineer 

Chief Engineer 

Classification Clerk 

Layout Man 

Manager 

Senior Engineer 

Engineering Supervisor 

Superintendent 

Housewife/Clerk 

Electrical Engineer 

Asst . Vice-President Bank 

Counter Help 

Draftsman 

Supv. of Nursery 

Asst. Secretary 

Hostess 

Social Service Tech. 

Retail Store Manager 

Senior Management Consultant 

Personnel Manager 

Land Surveying Eng. 

Elect. Engineer 

Real Estate Broker 

Waitress 

Librarian 

Field Service Trainee 

Educational Facility 

Banking/Treasurer 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife 

Senior Representative 

Adhesive Chemist 

Business Manager 

Curer 

Vice-President 

Sr. Test Equipment Eng. 



8 George Street 
119 Chestnut Street 

9 Partridge Hill Road 
50 Brookfield Road 

6 Crescent Drive 

81 High Street 

256 North Main Street 

3 Donald Circle 

8 Chestnut Street 
15 Pettingill Road 

7 Marion Avenue 

83 Pine Street 

7 Dufton Road 

20A Washington Park Dr 
200 Elm Street 
65 Andover Street 

84 High Street 

12 Crescent Drive 
37 Corbett Street 

21 Tewksbury Street 
20 Cuba Street 

8 Bridle Path Road 
2 Oriole Drive 

26 Burnham Road 
12 Bradley Road 
55 Elm Street 
B-2 Colonial Drive 

8 Lillian Terrace 

10 Barrington Drive 
1 Arcadia Road 

92 Dascomb Road 
36 Washington Avenue 
10 Abbot Bridge Drive 
49 Carmel Road 

4 Amherst Road 
69 Gould Road 
40 Burnham Road 

29 Pleasant Street 
52 Rocky Hill Road 
17 Barnard Street 

5 Barrington Drive 
31 Mohawk Road 

9 Deerberry Lane 
65 Stevens Street 

75 Shawsheen Road 
8 Collidge Road 
17 Bowdoin Road 
104 Hidden Road 

22 Upland Road 

76 Cross Street 

10 Fairfax Drive 
8 Carmel Road 
218 Holt Road 

30B Washington Park Dr. 
Crescent Dr. Bldg. 9 

82 Pine Street 

59 Haverhill Street 
4 Hackney Circle 
15 Beech Circle 



88 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Poynter, Elizabeth V. 
Poynter, Horace M. Jr. 
Praetz, Raymond J. 
Price, Peter E. 
Putnam, Eugene M. 
Pucci, Pasquale J. 
Ratte, Alfred A. 
Raye, Josephine C. 
Raymond, Frank H. 
Reason, Arthur W. 
Reed, Robert G. 
Reghitto, William M. 
Reoch, William A. 
Retalis, Peter S. 
Ricci, Arthur J. 
Richmond, Janet L. 
Rindone, Viola M. 
Ripa, Joseph R. 
Rokicki, Henry V. 
Romano , Lawrence 
Rosen, David F. 
Roy, Anita J. 
Sadowsky, Arthur J. 
Sadowsky, Benita 
Saliby, Emeline A. 
Sanchez, Virgil, W. Jr , 
Sapienza, Frances V. 
Sawaya, Vivian 
Schmidt, William C. 
Schwartz, Samuel 
Schwind, Peter 
Scileppi, John I. 
Scribner, Robert J. 
Seero, Edward V. 
Seggelkoe, Robert M. 
Schmidt, Robert R. 
Schreurs, Merle F. 
Seifel, Mary G. 
Selden, Georgeanna G. 
Sheehy, Kathleen C. 
Shiebler, Mary W. 
Shorten, Carmelle 
Shorten, Frederick V. 
Shrestinian, Ara 
Silva, Arthur 
Silverman, George 
Simpson, Anne G. 
Sloan, John P. 
Smalley, Bart F. 
Smith, Richard P. 
Sleath, John C. 
Skidmore, Earl F. 
Skinner, Malcolm E. 
Smith, Dorothy P. 
Snyder, Edith J. 
Sosnowski, Henry J. 
Souter, John C. 



Housewife 

Mechanical Engineer 

Project Engineer 

Chief Engineer 

Department Chief 

Electronics 

President & Salesman 

Tax Examiner 

Programmer 

Superintendent 

Bank Auditor 

Asst . Vice-President 

Insurance Broker 

Advertising Manager 

Office Administration 

Acct . Payable 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Program Manager 

Janitor 

Contractor 

Assembly 

Welder 

Housewife 

Wine Consultant 

Senior Engineer 

Homemaker 

Secretary 

Retired 

Retired 

Senior Engineer 

President 

Vice-President Underwriting 

Student /Retired 

Asst . Manager 

Sales Manager 

Coordinator 

Free Lance Copywriter 

Housewife 

Housewife /Bookkeeper 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Asst. Chief Dispatcher 

V.P. Testing & Inspection 

Retired 

Antiques 

Tester 

Inventory Control 

Retired 

Dept. Chief 

Asst . General Manager 

Retired 

Refrig. Service 

Administrative Asst. 

Housewife 

Senior Engineer 

Quality Control Engineer 



68 Elm Street 
68 Elm Street 
97 Cross Street 
20 Johnson Road 
12 Charlotte Drive 
96 Burnham Road 
Crescent Drive Bldg. 8 
8 Bowdoin Road 
50 County Road 

7 Walker Avenue 

8 Elm Court 

17 High Plain Road 
8 Kirkland Drive 
Evergreen Lane 

95 Haverhill Street 
30 Bancroft Road 

27 Rock Ridge Road 
121 Lowell Street 
33 Brown Street 

4 Sweeney Court 
344 High Plain Road 

18 Cuba Street 

43 Brookfield Road 
43 Brookfield Road 

19 Marion Avenue 

28 Burton Farm Drive 
33 Wildwood Road 

5 Twin Brook Circle 

18 Arthur Road 

5 Arthur Road 

20 Kathleen Drive 
26 Bannister Road 

6 Cyr Circle 

8 Fox Hill Road 
5 Agawam Lane 
72 Chestnut Street 
11 Farrwood Drive 
56 Porter Road 
40 School St. 
241 Lowell Street 
29A Maple Avenue 
50 Dufton Road 
50 Dufton Road 

5 Mitton Circle 
64 Chandler Road 

6 Parnassus Place 
16 Gray Road 

22 Enmore Street 

19 Hall Avenue 
4 Napier Road 

84 Blanchard Street 
A-l Colonial Drive 
67 Walnut Avenue 
3 Parnassus Place 
63 Maple Avenue 
25 Blood Road 
8 Jefferson Lane 



89 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Sparks, James K. 
Stack, John J. 
Staniewicz, Paul M. 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Stanton, Walter L. 
Storlazzi, Frances J. 
Sullivan, Edward 
Sweeney, John F. 
Symons, Fred 
Szymanowski, Margaret 
Tallini, Lucille 
Tarmey , Robert J. 
Tatro, John J. 
Tavitian, Vehanoosh 
Thomas, Dolores 
Thomes, Philip E. 
Thompson, Alice C. 
Thomson, Alexander Jr. 
Thomson, Alexander 
Torrisi, Thomas P. 
Townsend, Gary A. 
Tracy , Douglas 
Travis, Lewis F. 
Trenholm, James T. 
Trott, Robert L. 
Turner, Allen T. 
Tweedie, Villa J. 
Twigg, John E. 
Urquhart , William M. 
Valentine, William R. 
VanDerZee, Robert 
VanDewoestine, Vernon H. 
Vannett, William B. 
Vernon, John G. 
Vogt , Stanley 0. 
Wadman, Homer C. 
Wagner, Henry 
Wainwright, Henry 0. 
Wall, John M. 
Walsh, Mary E. 
Walsh, Monica L. 
Walsh, William D. 
Webb, Alfred E. 
Weiner, Ruth 
Weinstein, Mark A. 
Weir, William N. 
West, Helen 
West, Howard A. 
Wheat ley, James B. 
White, Cyril M. 
White, Frederick H. 
White, Kathleen A. 
Whitney, Lois-Ann 
Wilbur, Kari J. 
Wilbur, Mona L. 
Willis, Ruth 
Wilson, Ethel M. 



Retired 

System Standards Engineer 

Contract Accountant 

Retired 

Service/Oil Heating 

Housewife 

Lineman 

Asst. Treasurer 

Customer Service Engr. 

Housewife 

Wi reman 

Internal Revenue Service 

Plant Manager 

Sr. Associate Editor 

Housewife 

Stock Room Clerk 

Housewife 

Steamf itter 

Clerk 

Vice-President 

Assembler 

Marketing Representative 

Communications- Supervision 

Sales Representative 

Equip. Maintenance Mechanic 

Bartender 

Housewife 

Storekeeper 

Designer-Draftsman 

Electrical Engineer 

Service Representative 

Retired 

Retired 

General Service Officer 

Department Chief 

Retired 

Printer 

Supervisor 

Industrial Relations 

Housewife 

Homemaker 

Instructor 

Auto Body Repair 

Part-time Saleswoman 

Electrical Engineer 

Systems Analyst 

Housewife/L.P . N. 

Engineer 

Program Manager 

Chief Audit Division 

Dept. Chief 

Secretary 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Homemaker 

Real tor /Housewife 

Office Manager 



18 River Street 
45 Juniper Road 
Crescent Drive Bldg. 7 
23 Pasho Street 

6 Fleming Avenue 

7 Canterbury Street 

4 Appletree Lane 
44 Brookfield Road 

10 Carmel Road 

3 Cassimere Street 

19 Marland Street 
31 Essex Street 
17 Ayer Street 
Crescent Drive Bldg. 6 
9 Rocky Hill Road 

5 Hartigan Court 

19 Chandler Circle 
29 Stevens Street 

3 Walnut Avenue 

67 Lucerne Drive 

Crescent Dr. Bldg. 11 

26 Lucerne Drive 

62 Elm Street 

15 Westwind Road 

35 Chandler Circle 

6 Sandy Brook Circle 
12 Wolcott Avenue 
16A Harding Street 

3 Gray Road 

56 Woburn Street 

1 Napier Road 

1 Vine Street 

6 Brechin Terrace 

48 Balmoral Street 

11 Carmel Road 
107 High Street 
28 Marland Street 
53 High Plain Road 

5 Surrey Lane 
186 Salem Street 
33 Rock Ridge Road 
33 Pasho Street 

86 Ballardvale Road 
35 William Street 
3 Crestwood Drive 

49 Lupine Road 
72 Morton Street 

152 Haggetts Pond Road 
49 Greenwood Road 
28 Karlton Circle 

20 Burton Farm Drive 
11 Stirling Street 

6 Partridge Hill Road 

2 Meadowbrook Drive 
62 Brookfield Road 
6 Porter Road 

88 Lowell Street 



90 



JURY LIST - 1976 - 



Wilson, Kenneth 0. 
Wilson, Walter 
Wilton, Robert B. 
Wojtkun, Janina M. 
Wolfe, Philip 
Woodworth, Barbara 
Woodworth, Helen S. 
Workman, David E. 
Wormwood, Helen G. 
Wright, Jason C. 
Wrigley, Henry W. 
Yaghmoorian, Ann 
Zaharris, Bette 
Yancy, Frederick R. 
Zappala, Thomas A. 
Zaremba, Stanley A. 
Zussman, Peter E. 
Zwicker, Ernest 



Store Clerk 

President/Steel Fab, 

Purchasing Agent 

Homemaker 

Underwriter 

Homemaker 

At Home 

Manager of Systems 

Office Clerk 

Manager 

Unemployed 

Secretary 

At Home 

Retired 

Manager 

Utility Operator 

Student /Col lege 

Retired 



93 Tewksbury Street 
28 William Street 
Fosters Pond 
19 Moraine Street 

10 Carriage Hill Road 
310 North Main Street 
41 School Street 

9 Lovejoy Road 

11 Lowell Jet. Road 
13 Carisbrooke Street 
1 Lowell Jet . Road 

7 Cassimere Street 

6 Chaise Circle 

9 Central Street 

59 Carmel Road 

421 South Main Street 

68 Sunset Rock Road 

195 Greenwood Road 



91 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 22, 1976 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 9, 1976, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
assembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
and Six, viz: the Lower Parish Hall, Free Christian Church on Elm Street, Precinct 
One; the Lower Hall, Andover Baptist Church, in Precinct Two; the Cardinal Cushing 
Gymnasium, Haverhill Street, in Precinct Three; the West Elementary School, Beacon 
Street, in Precinct Four; the Fellowship Hall, Ballardvale United Church, Clark 
Road, Ballardvale, in Precinct Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in 
Precinct Six, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1976 

at 8:00 o'clock A.M. to act upon the following articles: 

ESSEX, SS. February 12, 1976 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true 
and attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no 
less than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and 
by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and publish- 
ed seven days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1 . Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The 
ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at 
eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock P.M. The total number of ballots 
cast was 5,404, viz: 



Precinct 1 - 



1010 



Precinct 2 - 



514 



Precinct 3 - 783 



Precinct 4 - 



1360 



Precinct 5 - 



526 



Precinct 6 - 1211 



PRECINCTS 



6 



554 278 468 814 305 777 
456 236 315 546 221 434 



394 


176 


336 


590 


236 


608 


192 


84 


137 


197 


66 


140 


252 


163 


163 


183 


98 


198 


178 


85 


136 


193 


58 


105 


84 


45 


76 


177 


58 


79 


387 


152 


340 


706 


267 


698 


325 


178 


201 


382 


155 


331 


208 


145 


177 


292 


114 


263 



MODERATOR-FOR ONE YEAR 

William J. Dalton 3196 

Blanks 2208 
SELECTMAN - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

Richard J. Bowen 2340 

Donald T. Coleman 816 

George W. Connors, Jr. 1057 

George F. Lannan , Jr. 755 

Stanley J. Nabydowski 519 

Susan T, Poore 2550 

Lawrence J. Sullivan 1572 

Blanks 1199 



92 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 22, 1976 





PRECINCTS 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


549 


270 


417 


851 


332 


827 


457 


223 


285 


524 


170 


390 


143 


73 


103 


195 


77 


198 


350 


149 


363 


437 


202 


544 


42 


39 


34 


48 


28 


44 


179 


94 


104 


301 


100 


177 


300 


180 


260 


364 


143 


242 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE-TWO FOR THREE YEARS 



David R. Ahouse 
♦Joseph A. Finn 

Paul L. Kenny 
*Casimir J. Kolaski 

David Bruce Leonard 

Robert P. Najjar 

Blanks 



3246 

2049 
789 

2045 
235 
955 

1489 



612 307 471 822 332 738 
398 207 312 538 194 473 



478 


278 


393 


558 


224 


475 


397 


171 


305 


665 


213 


534 


135 


65 


85 


137 


89 


202 



336 505 881 

336 529 961 

335 497 866 

290 468 828 

303 479 833 

970 1437 2431 



332 762 

348 774 

351 783 

312 717 

309 717 

978 2302 



207 


333 


675 


253 


595 


147 


241 


401 


146 


342 


160 


209 


284 


127 


274 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 

Thomas P. Eldred 3282 

Blanks 2122 

ONE FOR THREE YEARS 

GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 

TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 

COMMITTEE 

James A. Booth 2406 

John P. Childs 2285 

Blanks 713 

FIVE FOR THREE YEARS 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Arthur W. Cole 

Fred W. Doyle 

William V. Emmons 

Malcolm J. Ruhl 

Harry Sellars 

Blanks 

QUESTION 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 



3482 
3621 
3511 
3239 
3276 
9891 

2503 
1567 
1334 



All the foregoing officers and 
check lists were used. 



question were voted for on one ballot and the 



93 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 22, 1976 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 1 March 22, 1976 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2300. Number of spoiled ballots 2. Number of 
unused ballots 1295. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1297. Number of ballots 
voted 1010. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 1009. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
1009. Number of write-in ballots processed 0. Number of absentee ballots machine 
voted at Town Clerk's Office 6, Number of absentee ballots hand voted and counted 
at precinct 1. Grand total for precinct 1010. Forrest H. Noyes , Jr., Warden. 
Police Officer on duty, Sgt . Richard W. Enos. 

REPORT OF WARDEN- PRECINCT 2 March 22, 1976 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1200. Number of spoiled ballots 0. Number of 
unused ballots 691. Total spoiled and unused ballots 691. Number of ballots voted 
514. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer count 
514. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 514. 
Number of write-in ballots processed 0. Number of absentee ballots machine voted 
at Town Clerk's Office 5. Number of absentee ballots hand voted and counted at 
precinct 0. Grand total for precinct 514. Fernand J. Lussier, Warden. Police 
Officer on duty, Phillip E. Froberg. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 3 March 22, 1976 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2000. Number of spoiled ballots 3. Number 
of unused ballots 1216. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1219. Number of ballots 
voted 783. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 782. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
782. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of absentee ballots machine voted at 
Town Clerk's Office 1. Number of absentee hand voted and counted at precinct 1. 
Grand total for precinct 783. A. Norman Warhurst , Warden. Police Officer on duty, 
David St. Jean. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 4 March 22, 1976 

Number of votomatic ballots received 3500. Number of spoiled ballots 3. Number 
of unused ballots 2149. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 2152. Number of 
ballots voted 1360. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for 
computer count 1355. Number of defective ballots from defective tally sheet 2. 
Number of ballots counted by computer 1353. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number 
of absentee ballots machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 7. Number of absentee 
ballots hand voted and counted at precinct 5. Grand total for precinct 1360. 
James D. Doherty, Warden. Police Officer on duty, David Carney. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT, 5 March 22, 1976 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1300. Number of spoiled ballots 2. Number 
of unused ballots 774. Total spoiled and unused ballots 779. Number of ballots 
voted 526. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 525. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
525. Number of write-in ballots processed 0. Number of absentee ballots machine 
voted at Town Clerk's Office 4. Number of absentee ballots hand voted and counted 
at precinct 1. Grand total for precinct 526. Irving 0. Piper, Warden. Police 
Officer on duty, Lt . Lloyd Belbin. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 6 March 22, 1976 

Number of votomatic ballots received 3400. Number of spoiled ballots 0, Number 
of unused ballots 2207. Total spoiled and unused ballots 2207. Number of ballots vot- 
ed 1211 Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 1208. 
Number of ballots counted by computer 1208. Number of write-in ballots processed 1. 

94 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 22, 1976 

Number of absentee ballots machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 15. Number of 
absentee ballots hand voted and counted at precinct 3. Grand total for precinct 
1211. Albert R. Retelle, Warden. Police Officer on duty, Lawrence D. Lynch. 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue 
of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Monday, April 26, 1976 at 7:30 
o'clock P.M. at the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street 

* In response to a petition for a re-count for the Office of School Committee a 
re-count was held at the Andover High School Cafeteria on April 10, 1976. When 
a hand count of all ballots cast in the Town Election of March 22, 1976 were 
tabulated for School Committee, the results made no change in the original winner. 
Joseph A. Finn maintained his victory gaining one vote in the re-count. Mr. 
Kolaski the runner-up lost one vote in the re-count. 



95 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 26, 1976 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 714 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator at 7:40 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by the Rev. David Duncan of the West Parish 
Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman Janet D. Lake. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 21 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the Auditorium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator be allowed 
to dispense with the reading of the Warrant and the return of service of the 
Constable, that he be allowed to refer to the Articles by number as they appear 
in the Warrant, and that the reading of the names of non-voters be dispensed with. 

ARTICLE 1 . To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two 
School Committee members for three years, one member of the Andover Housing 
Authority for five years, one member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District Committee for three years, five Trustees of the 
Punchard Free School for three years and any other Town Officers required by law 
to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the following Question: 

QUESTION — "Shall an Act passed by the General Court 
in the year nineteen hundred and seventy- 
five, entitled 'An Act exempting certain 
engineering positions in the department of 
public works of the Town of Andover from 
the provisions of the civil service law' , 
be accepted?" 

All the above candidates and question to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter, announced the results of the election and question 
on March 22, 1976 and declared William J. Dalton elected as Moderator and that 
he had previously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that 
office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of the 
duties of their offices. 

William J. Dalton, Moderator for One Year 

Richard J. Bowen, Selectman for Three Years 

Susan T. Poore, Selectman for Three Years 

David R. Ahouse, School Committee for Three Years 

Joseph A. Finn, School Committee for Three Years 

Thomas P. Eldred, Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

James A. Booth, Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District Committee for Three Years 



96 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 26, 1976 
Arthur W. Cole, Trustee of The Punchard Free School for Three Years 
Fred W. Doyle, Trustee of The Punchard Free School for Three Years 
William V. Emmons, Trustee of The Punchard Free School for Three Years 
Malcolm J. Ruhl, Trustee of the Punchard Free School for Three Years 
Harry Sellars, Trustee of The Punchard Free School for Three Years 
QUESTION -- YES, 2503 -- NO, 1567 

ARTICLE 2 . To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by 
ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Fred W. Doyle be elected Trustee of 
the Cornell Fund for Three Years. 

ARTICLE 3 . To establish the salaries of the elected Town Officers for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the salaries of the elected 
Town Officials be established as follows: 

Moderator $100.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and 

$25.00 for each Special Town Meeting except 
when it falls within the Annual Meeting. 

Selectmen - Chairman $1,000.00 per year 

Selectmen - Members $ 800.00 per year 

ARTICLE 4 . To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1976 and ending June 30, 1977 as submitted by the Town 
Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee in its report. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and appropriate the 
following sums of money: 

Town Moderator Personal Services $ 125.00 

Board of Selectmen Personal Services 4,800.00 

Other Expenses 3,310.00 

(incl. $100.00 for 
out-of-state travel) 

Town Manager Personal Services 71,394.00 

*0ther Expenses (incl, 8,475.00 

$700.00 for out-of- 
state travel) 

Election & Registrations Personal Services 23,674.00 

Other Expenses 20,195.00 

Finance Committee Personal Services 1,260.00 

Other Expenses 5,375.00 

Town Accountant Personal Services 53,847.00 

Other Expenses 14,143.00 

Collector-Treasurer Personal Services 60,181.00 



97 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 26, 1976 



Board of Assessors 



Purchasing & Systems 



Town Counsel 



Town Clerk 



Planning Board 



Municipal Buildings 



Conservation Commission 



Industrial Development 
Commission 



Central Services 
Council on Aging 

Board of Appeals 

Police Department 

*It was voted unanimously 
to table this line item 
on April 26, and then voted 
to take from the table at 
the adjourned meeting of 
April 28. 



Other Expenses (incl. 
$450.00 for out-of- 
state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses (incl. 
$500.00 for out-of- 
state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses (incl. 
$400.00 for out-of- 
state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses (incl. 
$550.00 for out-of- 
state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 
(incl. $40.00 for out- 
of-state travel) 

Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Serv 
($832,842.00 
$195,000.00 f 
Revenue Shari 
further VOTED 
ditional Fede 
Sharing funds 
able prior to 
the Tax Rate 
the amount be 
of the additi 
$55,000.00) 
Other Expense 
for out-of-st 



ices 

less 

rom Federal 

ng. It was 

that if ad- 
ral Revenue 

be made avail- 

the setting of 
for Fiscal 77 that 

reduced by one-half 
onal funds up to 

s (incl. $500.00 
ate travel) 



$13,280.00 



48,835.00 
19,260.00 



40,334.00 
7,605.00 



15,000.00 
15,000.00 

23,058.00 
5.495.00 



11,297.00 
22,740.00 

31,888.00 
45,560.00 

2,900.00 
6,890.00 

700.00 



26,000.00 

10,100.00 
5,245.00 

3,945.00 
1,185.00 

637,842.00 

103,750.00 



98 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 26, 1976 



Fire Department 



Civil Defense 
Animal Control 
Electrical Inspection 
Weights & Measures 
Building Inspector 

Inspection Services 

Highways 

General Administration 

Parks 

Forestry 

Vehicle Maintenance 

Street Lighting 
Engineering 

Sewers 

Greater Lawrence 



Personal Services 
($925,153.00 less $195,000.00 
from Federal Revenue Sharing. 
It was further VOTED that if 
additional Federal Revenue 
Sharing funds be made available 
prior to the setting of the Tax 
Rate for Fiscal 77 that the 
amount be reduced by one-half of 
the additional funds up to 
$55,000.00) 

Other Expenses (incl. $350.00 
for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. $100.00 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. $100.00 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. $600.00 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses J 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

($155,381.00 which $140,000.00 
is to come from the Sewer System 
Reserve Fund) 



$730,153.00 



54 


630 


00 


1 


500 


00 




550 


00 


10 


700 


00 


6 


235 


00 


15 


,448 


00 


2 


745 


00 


2 


520 


00 




760 


00 


36 


342 


00 


6 


310 


00 


15 


849 


00 


1 


760 


00 


252 


125 


00 


384 


150 


00 


47 


639 


00 




900 


00 


78 


096 


00 


81 


785 


00 


69 


444 


00 


16 


475 


00 


36 


394 


00 


144 


520 


00 


114 


000 


00 


39 


391 


00 


1 


880 


00 


38 


204 


00 


33 


250 


00 



15,381.00 



99 



Solid Waste 



Board of Health 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 26, 1976 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Greater Lawrence 
Community Drug Council 



$9,093.00 
245,600.00 

72,094.00 
12,255.00 

12,000.00 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 10:16 P.M. until Tuesday April 27, 1976 at 7:30 P.M. in the Memorial 
Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 434 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator, at 7:38 P.M. 



Animal Inspection 
Veterans' Service 



Andover School 
Department 



Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational 
School 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Assistance 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses ($2,001,520.00 
less $67,012.00 from Public 
Law 874) (incl. $3,000.00 for 
out-of-state travel) 



600.00 

21,231.00 

1,305.00 

45,000.00 

7,800,000.00 
1,934,508.00 



153,259.00 



Library 



Recreation /Community 
School 



Water Department 



Spring Grove Cemetery 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses ($135,228.00 
less dog license reimburse- 
ments of $4,416.74 and Grants- 
in-Aid of $8,885.63) (incl. $620.00 
for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses (incl. $350.00 
for out-of-state travel) Special 
Program Account 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. $1,280.00 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
($48,107.00 less $12,000.00 
investment income 
Other Expenses (incl. $125.00 
for out-of-state travel) 



321,205.00 
121,925.63 



Insurance 



102,504.00 
73,080.00 
12,150.00 



220,040.00 
391,365.00 



36,107.00 
7.485.00 



149,300.00 



100 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Employee Benefits $90,536.00 

Patriotic and Civic 8,600.00 
Celebrations 

Veteran's Headquarters 0.00 
Rental 

Retirement Personal Services 5,914.00 

Other Expenses 680.00 

Pension Fund 371,213.00 

Cost-of-Living 0.00 

Non Contributory Pensions 42,839.00 

Cost-of-Living . 00 

Damages to Persons & Property 2,000.00 

Debt Service and Interest Expense 533,688.00 

Bond Issue Expense 10,000.00 

Bond Issue Redemptions 1,684,509.00 

Compensation Plan 245,000.00 

Reserve Fund ($150,000.00 - 60,000.00 

$90,000.00 to be derived 
from Over-lay Surplus) 



$18,400,909.63 
Total BUDGET to be raised by taxation 

ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1976, in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 17. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the financial year beginning July 1, 1976, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ART I CLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter 
into a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works Commissioners, 
the County Commissioners, and/or either of them, for the construction and maintenance 
of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town Manager be 
authorized to enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works Commissioners, the County Commissioners, and/or either of them, for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the 
ensuing year. 

101 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum 
of $100,000.00 for the purpose of installing storm drains; and to authorize the 
Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 
7 as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $100,000.00, $29,871.02 from taxation 
and the balance by transfer of the unexpended balances of the following appropria- 
tions : 

Lowell Junction Highway $37,750.22 

River Street Improvements 8,936.95 

Easements River Street 5,167.81 

Sidewalks-Haverhill Street 18,274.00 



Article 


4C 


1967 


Article 


4A 


1970 


Article 


50 


1970 


Article 


44 


1974 



$70,128.98 



A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. Voted by more than 2/3 
required. 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,657,000.00 or any other sum, for the purposes of constructing a water storage 
reservoir and of laying and relaying water mains of not less than six inches in 
diameter; to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise; and to raise and appropriate a further sum of money for the purpose of 
paying interest on any bonds or notes authorized hereunder; or to take any other 
action relating to the foregoing matters. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the sum of $940,000.00 be 
hereby appropriated for the purpose of constructing a water storage reservoir; 
that to raise such appropriations, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $940,000.00 pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 8 (4) of the General Laws for constructing a water storage reservoir, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town at one time or from time to time to evidence 
such borrowings: and that the further sum of $25,362.00 be hereby appropriated to 
pay interest on bonds or notes issued hereunder, said sum to be raised by taxation 
and an additional $5,188.00 from the following unexpended balances: 

Article 23 1973 Water Mains $2,703.63 

Article 13 1975 Water Mains 2,484.37 






$5,188.00 
A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

The Vote — YES 390, NO 7, Voted by more than 2/3 required. 

# 
ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Crescent Drive as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Plan No. 14928F, drawn by Clinton F. Goodwin, 
Surveyor, dated April 12, 1965, as modified and 
approved by the Court, filed in the Land Regis- 
tration Office, a copy of a portion of which is 
filed with Certificate of Title No. 5970, Book 
40, Page 281 for the Northern Registry District 
of Essex County." 

Plan and description filed with the Town Clerk, on petition of Maureen Mickevich 
and others. 

102 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Article 9 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
that portion of Rock 0' Dundee Road as approved by the Planning Board and laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan Rock 0' Dundee Road 
Owner: Donald I. and Barbara L. Richmond 
Subdivider: Donald I. Richmond 
Engineer: Clinton F. Goodwin, Haverhill, Mass. 

Scale: 1" = 40' 
Date: June 21, 1967", which plan is recorded with 
Northern District of Essex Registry of Deeds as 
Plan #5715. 

on petition of Ann F. Anderson and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 10 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, 
Rose Glen Drive, as shown on a Plan which was approved by the Andover Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Definitive Plan of Rose Glen 
Acres, Andover, Massachusetts, owned by Sidney P. White, to be developed by 
Olympic Construction, Inc.," by DeCesare & Lang, recorded in the Northern Essex 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6888. 

on petition of Andrew F. Shea and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 11 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Article 
VIII, Section IV. B (Table of Use Regulations), Paragraph 25 by deleting the entire 
paragraph and substituting the following therefor: 25. Repair garage or body shop 
for motorized vehicles. 

and 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Article VIII, Section 
IV. B. (Table of Use Regulations), Paragraph 36 by deleting the words "in a 
residence district" and substitute therefor the words "for residences in any 
district." Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED Unanimously to amend the 
Zoning By-Law, Article VIII, Section IV. B. (Table of Use Regulation), Paragraph 
25 by deleting the entire paragraph and substituting the following therefor: 25. 
Repair garage or body shop for motorized vehicles. 

and 

To amend the Zoning By-Law, Article VIII, Section IV. B. (Table of Use Regulations), 
Paragraph 36 by deleting the words "in a residence district" and substitute therefor 
the words "for residences in any district". 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

103 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act to authorize 
the Town of Andover to raise by taxation and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, a sum in the amount of $1,909.30 
to pay to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for passenger rail 
transportation provided during the period of January 1, 1975 through June 30, 1975 
and billed by said Authority to the Town, and, further, to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and 
appropriate the sum of $1,909.30 to pay to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation 
Authority for passenger rail transportation provided during the period of January 
1, 1975 through June 30, 1975 and billed by said Authority to the Town. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,909.30 to pay to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation 
Authority for passenger rail transportation provided during the period of January 
1, 1975 through June 30, 1975 and to further authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act to authorize 
the Town of Andover to pay said sum. 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter 
into a contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority to provide 
passenger rail service to Andover for the period commencing July 1, 1976 and to raise 
by taxation and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or by any combination 
of the foregoing, the sum of $25,000.00 to pay to that Authority the net additional 
cost, if any, which may be owing pursuant to the contract for the Town's fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1977; and to take any other actions relating thereto. 

Article 14 was withdrawn. 

* ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as public way and name 
Hampton Lane as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown in plan entitled: 

"Definitive plan Parkhurst , Andover, Mass., Owner, 
Antonio J. Tambone, Engineer, Hayes Engineering, 
Inc., August 25, 1966", which plan is recorded with 
North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan 
#5632. 

Plan and description with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 15 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

* ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Rutgers Road as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on plan entitled: 

"Definitive plan Parkhurst, Andover, Mass., Owner, 
Antonio J. Tambone, Engineer, Hayes Engineering, 
Inc., August 25, 1966", which plan is recorded with 
North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan 
#5632. 

Plan and description with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Karen J. Nicholas and others. 



104 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 16 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

* ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Rindge Road as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on plan entitled: 

"Definitive plan Parkhurst , Andover, Mass., Owner 
Antonio J. Tambone , Engineer, Hayes Engineering, Inc., 
August 25, 1966", which plan is recorded with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5632. 

Plan and description with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 17 as print- 
ed in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

* ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Sheffield Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: 

"Definitive plan Parkhurst, Andover, Mass., Owner, 
Antonio J. Tambone, Engineer, Hayes Engineering, Inc., 
August 25, 1966", which plan is recorded with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5632. 

Plan and description with the Town Clerk. 

on petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 18 as printed 
in the Warrant 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

* The Moderator stepped down from the podium and then designated Mr. Frederick 
Fitzgerald to preside during action on these Articles. 

ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum 
of $17,900.00 for the purpose of improving all the ways as shown on the "Definitive 
Plan Parkhurst" Andover, Mass. Said plan is recorded in the North Essex Registry 
of Deeds, as Plan #5632. Betterments in the sum of $13,400.00 shall be assessed 
against all owners of land shown on said plan. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 19 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $17,900.00 from taxation and further that 
Betterments be assessed in the amount of $13,400.00. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED at 
9:10 P.M. to adjourn the regular Town Meeting and reconvene after action on the 
Special Town Meeting Warrant. 



105 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to 
dispense with the reading of the Warrant and return of Service of the Constable - 
and that the Moderator refer to the Articles by number and by subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the 
Town shall appropriate from available funds to supplement existing appropriations 
for the current fiscal year ending June 30, 1976. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $80,000.00 be 
transferred from available funds to the 1976 Reserve Fund. 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
in the name and behalf of the Town to remise and release to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, through it's Department of Public Works, whose Post Office address 
is 100 Nashua Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114, hereinafter referred to as 
the Department, all right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said Grantor has, 
or ought to have in and to a certain Vehicular Bridge being Bridge A-9-10 and being 
identified as Railroad Bridge No. 23.12, said bridge being a continuation and 
extension of a public way known as Harding Street in the Town of Andover providing 
Vehicular passage for the public over the tracts of the Boston and Maine Corporation- 
Debtor. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 2 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen in 
the name and behalf of the Town to remise and release to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, through it's Department of Public Works, whose Post Office address 
is 100 Nashua Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, hereinafter referred to as the 
Department, all right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said Grantor has, or 
ought to have in and to a certain Vehicular Bridge being Bridge A-9-11 and being 
identified as Railroad Bridge No. 22.99, said bridge being a continuation and 
extension of a public way known as Main Street in the Town of Andover providing 
Vehicular passage for the public over the tracts of Boston and Maine Corporation - 
Debtor . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 3 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen in 
the name and behalf of the Town to remise and release to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, through it's Department of Public Works, whose Post Office address 
is 100 Nashua Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, hereinafter referred to as the 
Department, all right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said Grantor has, or 
ought to have in and to a certain Vehicular Bridge being Bridge A-9-15 and being 
identified as Railroad Bridge No. 24.17, said bridge being a continuation and 
extension of a public way known as Tewksbury Street in the Town of Andover providing 
Vehicular passage for the public over the tracts of the Boston and Maine Corporation- 
Debtor . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 4 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED that 
the Special Town Meeting be adjourned Sine Di at 9:20 P.M. 



106 









ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will take the action required to limit the 
authority of the Town Manager to spend money for purposes not specifically voted 
by Town Meeting and, to accomplish this by modifying the Town Charter's paragraph 
(b) of Section Ten (Chapter 571 of the Acts of 1956 of the General Court) by re- 
moving the last twenty-four words of Paragraph (b) with the exception of these 
words "in accordance with the vote of the Town:" or take any other action that 
will accomplish the same purpose. 

on petition of Karl Haartz and others. 

Article 20 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appro- 
priate the sum of $200,000.00 for the purpose of undertaking and completing a 
property equalization program and to authorize the Town Manager to engage profes- 
sional consultants or employees for this purpose. 

Article 21 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 22 . An article to see whether the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
will accept as a public way, Azalea Drive. For plan reference see plan on file 
at the Office of the Town Clerk. See also Land Court Plan 32408A, filed at the 
North Essex Registry of Deeds, Land Court Book 38, Page 153. 

on petition of John E. Magee, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 22 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 23 . An Article to see whether the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
will accept as a public way, Snowberry Road. For plan reference see plan on file 
at the Office of the Town Clerk. See also Land Court Plan 32408A, filed at the 
North Essex Registry of Deeds, Land Court Book 38, Page 153. 

on petition of John E. Magee, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 23 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 24 . An Article to see whether the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
will accept as a public way, Fern Road. For plan reference see plan on file at 
the Office of the Town Clerk. See also Land Court Plan 32408A, filed at the North 
Essex Registry of Deeds, Land Court Book 38, Page 153. 

on petition of John E. Magee, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 24 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 25 . An Article to see whether the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
will accept as a public way, a section of Glenwood Road, from the intersection of 
Morningside Drive and Glenwood Road to the intersection of Fern Road and Glenwood 
Road. For further description see Land Court Plan 32408A, filed at the North 
Essex Registry of Deeds, Land Court Book 38, Page 153. For further plan reference 



107 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

see plan on file at the Office of the Town Clerk. 

on petition of John E. Magee , Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 25 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to change from Industrial A to 
Industrial D a portion of land in West Andover described as follows: 

Beginning at the intersection of the centerline of Interstate Route 93 
and the centerline of the Merrimack River (Assessors' Map 164), thence 
running easterly by the centerline of the Merrimack River to the north- 
erly extension of the easterly line of Lot 1 (Assessors' Map 125), thence 
southerly 3,000 feet more or less along the easterly line of Lot 1 and 
Lot 1A (Assessors' Map 125) and Lot 3 (Assessors' Map 126) to a point 200 
feet northerly of the centerline of River Road, thence westerly on a line 
200 feet northerly and parallel to the centerline of River Road 820 feet 
more or less to the easterly line of Lot (Assessors' Map 143), thence 
southerly by the easterly line of Lot 10 (Assessors' Map 143) 200 feet to 
the centerline of River Road, thence westerly along the centerline of 
River Road and Old River Road to the centerline of Interstate Route 93 
(Assessors' Map 165) thence northerly along the centerline of Interstate 
Route 93 to the point of beginning. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to change from Industrial A to 
Industrial D a portion of land in West Andover described as follows: 

Beginning at the intersection of the centerline of Interstate Route 93 and 
the centerline of the Merrimack River (Assessors' Map 164), thence running 
easterly by the centerline of the Merrimack River to the northerly extension 
of the easterly line of Lot 1 (Assessors' Map 125), thence southerly 3,000 
feet more or less along the easterly line of Lot 1 and Lot 1A (Assessors' 
Map 125) and Lot 3 (Assessors' Map 126) to a point 200 feet northerly of the 
centerline of River Road, thence westerly on a line 200 feet northerly and 
parallel to the centerline of River Road 820 feet more or less to the 
easterly line of Lot 10 (Assessors' Map 143), thence southerly by the 
easterly line of Lot 10 (Assessors' Map 143) 200 feet to the centerline of 
River Road, thence westerly along the centerline of River Road and Old River 
Road to the centerline of Interstate Route 93 (Assessors' Map 165) thence 
northerly along the centerline of Interstate Route 93 to the point of be- 
ginning. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

The Vote YES 318, NO 47 Voted by more than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Article 
VIII by making the following changes in the Industrial D categories: 

1. YARDS AND FRONTAGE 



Amend Section V "Dimensional Requirements, A, Table of Dimensional 
Requirements", revising entries in the Industrial ID row, to provide as follows: 

Minimum Lot Dimensions 
Area, sq. ft. 
Frontage, ft. 50 

108 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Minimum Yard Depth 

Front, ft. 100 

Side, ft. 100 

Rear, ft. 100 
Max. Height 

Feet 50 

No. of stories 3 
Max. coverage, incl. 

Accessory buildings 25% 

2. YARD CONTROL 

Amend Section V "Dimensional Requirements", Paragraph B. 
"Exceptions and Special Requirements", Section 8. "Industrial Districts", by 
inserting a new subsection "c" to read as follows: 

c. In all industrial districts, yard depth requirements will be measured from 
the street line of a public way or internal access road, whichever is applicable. 

'd. In Industrial District D, required yard areas shall be developed and main- 
tained only for lawns, landscaping, walks, driveways, and parking areas; provided, 
however, that no parking area shall be located within fifty feet of any street line 
unless a special permit to reduce this requirement is granted by the Zoning Board 
of Appeals upon its determination that circumstances of the site and its design 
provide control of visual intrusion and traffic comparable to the usual application 
of this requirement." 

3. OFF-STREET PARKING 



Amend Section VI "Other Requirements" Paragraph A "Parking" 
by deleting Section 4 Industrial Districts, and replacing it with the following: 

'4. Industrial Districts 

a. Intent and Application 

Adequate off-street parking must be provided on the premises to 
service all parking demand created by new construction, whether through 
new structures or through additions to existing ones, or by change of 
use creating higher parking demands. 

Building, structures and land uses in existence on the effective 
date of these provisions are not subject to these parking requirements 
and may be rebuilt, altered or repaired, but not enlarged or changed 
in use, without becoming subject to them. 

In applying for building or occupancy permits, the applicant must 
demonstrate that the minimum parking requirements set forth will be 
met for the new demand without counting existing parking. 

These requirements may be reduced on special permit for an exception 
from the Zoning Board of Appeals upon their determination that special 
circumstances render a lesser provision adequate for all parking needs. 

"b. Schedule of Requirements 

Use # 

(Sec. IVB) Description Requirement 

9, 13, 17 Recreation, school, 

restaurant One space per four persons max. 

occupancy, based on Table 6-1, 

109 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Use # 

(Sec. IVB) Description Requirement 

20 Office One space per 300 sq . ft. usable 

floor area 

21 Motel, hotel One space per guest unit plus one 

space per eight guest units 

28, 29 Lab, manufacturing 0.75 space per employee on largest 

shift, but capable of expansion 
to not less than one space per 
300 sq . ft. usable floor area 

31, 32, 32, 

34A, 34B Misc. uses Determined by Building Inspector 

on advice of Planning Board. 



'c. Parking Lot Design 

"Not more than one driveway shall be permitted in any 150 feet of 
frontage. 

"In Industrial D Districts, the following shall apply unless the 
Building Inspector, upon advice of the Planning Board, determines that 
alternative provisions provide comparable control of traffic flow, micro- 
climate, and visual intrusion. Each parking area shall contain no more 
than 240 spaces, with no more than 30 spaces in any uninterrupted row. 
Each parking area shall be enclosed (except for access points) by a land- 
scaped buffer not less than twelve feet wide and shall have additional 
landscaping equivalent in area to one parking space for each thirty spaces 
provided. 

"d. Loading 

Adequate off-street loading facilities and space must be provided in- 
side or rear areas, only to service all needs created by new construction, 
whether through new structures or additions to old ones, and by change of 
use of existing structures. Facilities shall be so sized and arranged that 
no trucks need back onto or off of a public way or internal access road, or 
be parked on a public way or internal access road while loading, unloading, 
or waiting to do so. 

4. DESIGN CONTROLS 






to read as follows: 
"H. Industrial D 



Amend Section VI "Other Requirements" by adding Paragraph H, 



All development in an Industrial D District shall be subject to the following, 
unless a special permit for an exception to these requirements is granted by the 
Zoning Board of Appeals, upon its determination that alternative provisions pro- 
vide comparable protection for adjoining parcels and ways: 

1. All utility service lines shall be placed underground. All trans- 
formers, meters, or similar utility apparatus shall be placed on or below 
the surface of the land and be screened from view. 

2. All developed land area not covered by buildings, parking areas, drive- 
ways and other site improvements shall be landscaped and all parking areas 
shall be screened by landscaping see Sections VI. C. 2. and VI. A. 4(c) . All 

110 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

undeveloped portions of land may remain in the natural state providing such 
areas do not create a hazard or nuisance. 

3. Walkways and parking areas shall be adequately lighted. No outdoor 
lighting shall be mounted higher than twenty-five feet above finished grade, 
and lighting sources shall be shielded to prevent excessive glare on 
adjoining property. 

4. All rooftop mechanical equipment shall be grouped and screened. 

5. Site Plan Review 

a. Prior to application for building permits on projects involving 
10 or more parking spaces, three prints of the plot plan shall be 
submitted to the Planning Board for advisory review. Prints of the 
plot plan shall be referred by the Planning Board to the Conservation 
Commission, and the Department of Public Works for their review and 
written advisory reports. Planning Board comments, if any, shall be 
returned to the applicant within 30 days of submission. 

'b. Plans subject to this section shall show dimensions of the Lot, size 
and location of existing and proposed structures, adjacent streets and ways, 
existing and proposed topography, any wetlands, storm drainage, underground 
utilities, drives, walks, loading and parking, retained v. created land- 
scaping, lighting, and sign locations. 

"c. Plans subject to this Section shall be designed so as to assure safety 
of internal circulation and egress, provide adequate access to each structure 
for fire and service equipment, and provide adequate utility service and 
drainage, consistent with the functional intent of Section IV, Design 
Standards, of the current Subdivision Regulations of the Andover Planning 
Board . 

5. SIGNS 



Amend Section VI "Other Requirements", Paragraph B. "Signs", 
subparagraph d. "Industrial Districts", by deleting sub-subparagraph (2) in its 
entirety, replacing it with the following: 

(2) Signs attached flat against the wall of a building, advertising the name 
of the firm or goods or services available or produced on the premises; provided 
that the total area of all signs does not exceed ten (10) percent of the area of 
the side of the building to which they are attached, or 100 square feet, which- 
ever is less. 

and 

by deleting the last sentence in sub-subparagraph (3) and replacing it with the 
following : 

Such sign shall not be located closer than ten (10) feet to any property 
line or the line of any way and no part of any such sign shall be more 
than six (6) feet above ground level. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend the Zoning 
By-Law Article VIII by making the following changes in the Industrial D categories: 

1. YARDS AND FRONTAGE 



Amend Section V "Dimensional Requirements, A, Table of 
Dimensional Requirements", revising entries in the Industrial ID row, to provide 
as follows: 

111 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

Minimum Lot Dimensions 

Area, sq . ft. 

Frontage, ft. 50 

Minimum Yard Depth 

Front, ft. 100 

Side, ft. 100 

Rear, ft. 100 

Max. Height 

Feet 50 

No. of stories 3 

Max. coverage, incl. 

Accessory buildings 25% 

YARD CONTROL 



Amend Section V "Dimensional Requirements", Paragraph B. 
"Exceptions and Special Requirements", Section 8. "Industrial Districts", by 
inserting new subsections "c" and "d" to read as follows: 

c. In all industrial districts, yard depth requirements will be measured from 
the street line of a public way or internal access road, whichever is applicable. 

d. In Industrial District D, required yard areas shall be developed and main- 
tained only for lawns, landscaping, walks, driveways, and parking areas; provided, 
however, that no parking area shall be located within fifty feet of the street 
line of any public way or internal access road on which the building fronts 
unless a special permit to reduce this requirement is granted by the Zoning 
Board of Appeals upon its determination that circumstances of the site and its 
design provide control of visual intrusion and traffic comparable to the usual 
application of this requirement. 

3. OFF-STREET PARKING 



Amend Section VI "Other Requirements" Paragraph A "Parking" 
by deleting Section 4 Industrial Districts, and replacing it with the following: 

4. Industrial Districts 

a. Intent and Application 

Adequate off-street parking must be provided on the premises to service 
all parking demand created by new construction, whether through new structures 
or through additions to existing ones, or by change of use creating higher 
parking demands. 

Buildings, structures and land uses in existence on the effective date 
of these provisions are not subject to these parking requirements and may 
be rebuilt, altered or repaired, but not enlarged or changed in use, without 
becoming subject to them. 

In applying for building or occupancy permits, the applicant must 
demonstrate that the minimum parking requirements set forth below will be 
met for the new demand without counting existing parking. 

These requirements may be reduced on special permit for an exception 
from the Zoning Board of Appeals upon their determination that special 
circumstances render a lesser provision adequate for all parking needs. 

b. Schedule of Requirements 



112 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

USE # 

(Sec. IVB Description Requirement 



9, 13, 17 Recreation, school, 

restaurant One space per four persons max. 

occupancy, based on Table 6-1, 
Mass. State Building Code 

20 Office One space per 300 sq. ft. usable 

floor area 

21 Motel, hotel One space per guest unit plus one 

space per eight guest units 

28, 29 Lab, manufacturing 0.75 space per employee on 

largest shift, but capable of 
expansion to not less than one 
space per 300 sq. ft. usable 
floor area 

31, 32, 33, 

34A, 34B Misc. uses Determined by Building Inspector 

on advice of Planning Board 

c. Parking Lot Design- 
Only one driveway shall be permitted in any 150 feet of frontage un- 
less the frontage is less, in which case, a single driveway access to the 
property will be permitted. 

In Industrial D Districts, the following shall apply unless the 
Building Inspector, upon advice of the Planning Board, determines that 
alternative provisions provide comparable control of traffic flow, micro- 
climate, and visual intrusion. Each parking area shall contain no more 
than 240 spaces, with no more than 30 spaces in any uninterrupted row. 
Each parking area shall be enclosed (except for access points) by a land- 
scaped buffer not less than twelve feet wide and shall have additional 
landscaping equivalent in area to one parking space for each thirty spaces 
provided. 

d. Loading 

Adequate off-street loading facilities and space must be provided in 
side or rear yards only, to service all needs created by new construction, 
whether through new structures or additions to old ones, and by change of 
use of existing structures. Facilities shall be so sized and arranged that 
no trucks need back onto or off of a public way or internal access road, 
or be parked on a public way or internal access road while loading, unloading, 
or waiting to do so. 

4. DESIGN CONTROLS 



to read as follows: 
H Industrial D 



Amend Section VI "Other Requirements" by adding Paragraph H, 



All development in an Industrial D District shall be subject to the follow- 
ing, unless a special permit for an exception to these requirements is granted 
by the Zoning Board of Appeals, upon its determination that alternative provi- 
sions provide comparable protection for adjoining parcels and ways: 

113 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

1. All utility service lines shall be placed underground. All trans- 
formers, meters, or similar utility apparatus shall be placed on or below 
the surface of the land and be screened from view. 

2. All developed land area not covered by buildings, parking areas, 
driveways and other site improvements shall be landscaped and all parking 
areas shall be screened by landscaping see Sections VI. C. 2 and VI. A. 4(c) . 
All undeveloped portions of land may remain in the natural state providing 
such areas do not create a hazard or nuisance. 

3. No outdoor lighting shall be mounted higher than twenty-five feet 
above finished grade, and lighting sources shall be designed to prevent 
excessive glare on adjoining property. 

4. Site Plan Review 

a. Prior to application for building permits on projects involving 
10 or more parking spaces, three prints of the plot plan shall be 
submitted to the Planning Board for advisory review. Prints of the 
plot plan shall be referred by the Planning Board to the Conservation 
Commission, and the Department of Public Works for their review and 
written advisory reports. Planning Board comments, if any, shall be 
returned to the applicant within 30 days of submission. 

b. Plans subject to this section shall show dimensions of the lot, size and 
location of existing and proposed structures, adjacent streets and ways, existing 
and proposed topography, any wetlands, storm drainage, underground utilities, 
drives, walks, loading and parking, retained v. created landscaping, lighting, 
and sign locations. 

c. Plans subject to this Section shall be designed so as to assure safety of 
internal circulation and egress, provide adequate access to each structure for 
fire and service equipment, and provide adequate utility service and drainage, 
consistent with the functional intent of Section IV, Design Standards, of the 
current Subdivision Regulations of the Andover Planning Board. 

5. SIGNS 

Amend Section VI "Other Requirements", Paragraph B. "Signs", 
subparagraph d. "Industrial Districts", by deleting sub-subparagraph (2) ~in its 
entirety, replacing it with the following: 

(2) Signs attached flat against the wall of a building, advertising the 
name of the firm or goods or services available or produced on the premises; 
provided that the total area of all signs does not exceed ten (10) percent of 
the area of the side of the building to which they are attached. 






and 



by deleting the last sentence in sub-subparagraph (3) and replacing it with the 
following : 

Such sign shall not be located closer than ten (10) feet to any property 
line or the line of any way and no part of any such sign shall be more than 
six (6) feet above ground level. 



and 



Amend the Zoning By-Law, Section II (Definitions) by adding a new definition #23, 
as follows: * 



114 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 



23. Internal Access Road: in Industrial District, any road, or drive which 
provides exclusive vehicular access to more than one industry or parcel. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

The Vote YES 293, NO 73 Voted by more than 2/3 required. 



ARTICLE 28. 



To see what amount the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 



transfer from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appro- 
priate for the purpose of providing an audit of the Town's municipal accounts for 
the period of January 1, 1972 through June 30, 1976. 

Article 28 was withdrawn 



ARTICLE 29. 



To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 



32B, Section 7A paragraph D, of the Massachusetts General Laws, so as to affirm 
the following question: 

"Shall the Town in addition to the payment of 50% of a premium for contributory 
group life and health insurance for employees in the service of the Town and their 
dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional rate?" 

on petition of Sheila Zeder and others. 

Article 29 was defeated. 



ARTICLE 30. 



To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 



or transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed $5,000.00 to pay unpaid bills 
for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from available 
funds the sum of $3,737.59 to pay the following unpaid bills incurred in prior fis- 
cal years: 



DEPARTMENT 



Fire 



Fire 



Fire 



Animal 
Control 

Police 



Veterans 

D.P.W. 
D.P.W. 
D.P.W. 
D.P.W. 
School 



VENDOR 

Equipment 
Specialists, Inc. 

Woodworth Motors, Inc 



Personal Services 

Andover Animal 
Hospital 

Victor Service 
Bureau 

Andover Lodge 
2198 (Elks) 

W. A. Schlott Tire Co. 

Simpson's Inc. 

W. A. Schlott Tire Co. 

Sherwin-Williams 

Malco Electronics, Inc. 



FOR 

Service to Air 
Conditioner 

Service and Repairs 
Ambulance 

Call Firemen 

Board, Etc. 

Alarm monitors 

Memorial Day 
Buffet 

Tubes 

Misc. supplies 

Tubes 

Paint 

Recorders (Sony) 



AMOUNT 
$339.23 

165.92 

345.00 
444.00 

500.00 

200.00 

5.25 

100.01 

77.76 

8.05 
765.00 



115 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1976 

DEPARTMENT VENDOR FOR AMOUNT 

School Victor Service Bureau Police Alarm 20.00 

School Abalene Pest Control Services 54.00 

Service 

School Cameron-Mclndoo, Ltd. Furniture 555.65 

School IBM Typewriter Element 18.00 

School Medi-Cab of Mass. Bay Transportation 75.00 

School Ward's Natural Science Materials 13.16 

Establishment, Inc. 

School Laidlaw Brothers Books 51.56 

$3,737.59 

Voted by more than 4/5 as required. 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way, Lakeside 
Circle as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on a plan entitled "Sub- 
division & Acceptance Plan Lakeside" which plan is recorded in the North Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan #3476. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 31 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the 
sum of $9,000.00 for the purpose of improving the way known as Lakeside Circle. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 32 as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $9,000.00 from taxation. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 33 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way, a certain 
portion of Greenwood Road, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and as shown on 
a plan entitled, "Plan of a Portion of Greenwood Road, Andover, Mass., as laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen, Town of Andover, Mass., Dec. 1975". Said portion of 
Greenwood Road lies between Lowell Street and High Plain Road. 

Article 33 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 34 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of widening Greenwood Road, and to authorize the 
Selectmen to acquire the necessary land therefore, by purchase, by gift, or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Article 34 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniel and duly seconded, it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 10:23 P.M. until Wednesday April 28, 1976 at 7:30 P.M. in the Memorial 
Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 

116 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 758 admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator, at 7:42 P.M. 

ARTICLE 35 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum 
of $6,000.00 for the purpose of relocating water pipes presently located under Old 
Argilla Road to the present Argilla Road. 

on petition of Gerald M. Lewis and others. 

Article 35 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 36 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum 
of $4,000.00 for the purpose of developing bikeways in the Town; and, further, to 
authorize the Town Manager to file an application for funds for purposes relating 
to the development of bikeways, in form and manner as may be required by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States Government and to contract for 
and expend said funds. 

Inserted at the request of the Andover Bikeways Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to authorize the Town Manager 
to file an application for funds for purposes relating to the development of bike- 
ways, in form and manner as may be required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and the United States Government and to Contract for and expend said funds. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 37 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000.00 for the purpose of contracting with the Greater Lawrence Mental Health 
Center, Inc. (a non-profit public corporation) for the provision of comprehensive 
outpatient mental health and mental retardation services. 

on petition of John H. Hess and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 37 as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $25,000.00 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 38 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdiction and 
control of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8C as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described land: 

Lot 5 of Assessors' Map #202, containing approximately 
6.47 acres of land and located off Dascomb Road, north 
side, and abutting land owned by the Andover Village 
Improvement Society. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Article 38 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 39 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdiction and 
control of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8 as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described land: 

Lot 1 of Assessors' Map #104, containing approximately 

117 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 

5.8 acres of land and located on the West side of South 
Main Street adjoining the North Reading Town line. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 
39 as printed in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 40 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
or transfer from available funds or any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
the sum of $40,000.00 for renovations and improvements to the former theater build- 
ing, now owned by the Town of Andover, on Essex Street. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $15,000.00 be 
transferred from available funds for the purpose of renovations and improvements 
to the former Theater Building now owned by the Town. 

ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum 
of $20,000.00 for the purpose of providing studies and plans relating to the im- 
provement of mass transportation services in the Town; and, further, to authorize 
the Town Manager to file an application for funds for the purpose of providing 
studies and plans relating to the improvement of mass transportation services in 
the Town, in form and manner as may be required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and the United States Government and to contract for and expend said funds. 

Article 41 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 42 . To see if the Town will vote to accept a gift of land from the 93 
Building Trust. Said land contains approximately 0.156 acres and is shown as parcel 
"I" on a plan of land entitled "subdivision plan of land in Andover, Massachusetts," 
prepared by Ganteaume & McMullen, said plan is recorded in the North Essex Registry 
of Deeds, as Plan #7039. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 42 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 43 . To see if the Town will vote to accept a gift of land from the 93 
Building Trust. Said land to provide for a turn-around at the northerly end of 
Laurel Lane. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town accept a gift of 
land from 93-Building Trust for the purpose of providing a turnaround on Laurel 
Lane. Said land to be the shaded area at the northerly end of Laurel Lane as shown 
on drawing No. C-l, entitled "Definitive Road Plan, Ninety-three Building Trust, 
easterly access road Plan - Section I, prepared by Ganteaume & McMullen, dated 
October 8, 1975". 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 44 . To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the authority granted by 
the Massachusetts General Laws, C.82, Sec. 21, to discontinue the northerly end of 
Laurel Lane as a public way. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town discontinue all 

118 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 

that portion of Laurel Lane lying northerly of the turnaround of Laurel Lane as 
shown on Drawing No. C-l entitled "Definitive Road Plan Ninety-three Building Trust, 
easterly access road plan, Section 1, prepared by Ganteaume & McMullen, dated 
October 8, 1975". 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 45 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as public ways, 
Abbot Bridge Drive , Danforth Circle , Spruce Circle , Eastman Road , Livingston Circle , 
Jefferson Lane , and Hartford Circle , and easements as shown on a plan entitled, 
"Horn Bridge Estates", owned by Parkwood Construction Corp., drawn by Albert A. 
Miller & Wilbur C. Nylander, Civil Engineers of Lexington, Mass., dated November 1, 
1966, revised March 23, 1967, recorded with the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan #5718. 

on petition of Harry M. Webster and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 45 as printed 
in the Warrant . 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 46 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate 
the sum of $450,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing relocatable classrooms for the 
use of the Andover School Department. 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee. 

Article 46 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 47 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$930,000.00, or any other sum, for the purpose of acquiring by purchase or other- 
wise for conservation and/or recreation purposes all or a portion of the following 
described parcels of land and buildings thereon: 



MAP # 



LOT # 



SITE 


#1 




FISH 


BROOK WETLANDS 


146 




4 


170 




1 


170 




2 


170 




4 


146 




2 


169 




1 


169 




2 


189 




3 


172 




7 


172 




3A 


172 




3 



SUPPOSED TO BE OWNED BY 



Mooradian, Anne & Arakelian, Sarkeo 

Park, Robert A. & Catherine T. 

Park, Robert A. & Catherine T. 

Boloian, John & Mary 

Boloian, John & Mary 

Leoff, Irving & Shirley 

Murphy, James T. & Marie D. 

Henderson, Ernest J. & Bette L. 

Netti, David & Catherine A. 

Boston & Maine RR 

Sullivan, J. Terrance & Patricia A. 



AREA (+/-) 



12 A 

1 A 

3 A 

38 A 

20 

12 

18 

12 

12 

1.84 

5.70 



SITE #2 

WOOD HILL- BALD HILL 



172 
193 
193 
193 



1 

2 

3 

4,5,6,7. 

8,9,10, 

11,12,13, 



High Plain Realty Trust 

Tr. Davidson, L. John and Kane 



5,800 sf 
43.5 A 
46.845 A 
21 A 



119 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 
MAP # LOT # SUPPOSED TO BE OWNED BY AREA (+/-) 





14 


15 


16, 




17 


18 


19, 




20 


21 


22, 




23 


24 




194 


1 






194 


3 






194 


4 






194 


5 






194 


6 






194 


7 






209 


1 






210 


5 






209 


2 






218 


8 







31.15 A 
35.655 A 
36,888 sf 
38,595 sf 
38,063 sf 
30,405 sf 
39 A 
16.04 A 

Dispirito, Antonio 3 A 

Baker's Meadow Realty Tr. 22 A 

(Mitton, Neal L.; Schurian, Herbert; 

Watson, Joseph A. and Williams, Arthur) 



36 


2 


36 


2A 


36 


7 


36 


8 


36 


88A 


36 


91 


37 


3 


37 


4 


37 


5 



SITE #3 

SACRED HEART PROPERTY 

The Order of the Brothers of Sacred 3.8 A 

Heart of N. E., Inc. 1,026 sf 

8.4 A 
8.6 A 
21,120 sf 
1.3 A 
1.2 A 
2.2 A 

2.5 A 

SITE #4 

SKUG RIVER WETLANDS 

29 IB Booth, James 14.46 A 

30 4 Holt, Lillian & Kelman, Mrs. J.N. 21 A 

30 1 Raza, J.T. & Bergeron, Richard R. 85.8 A 

31 1 Pettigrew, Dennis & Ann 38 A 

Mortimer, Reginald & Belinda 
49 2 Johnson, Margaret 5.77 A 

SITE #5 

SHAWSHEEN RIVER FRONTAGE 

73 6 Cutler, Granville and Elaine 2.690 A 

to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; 

and to authorize the application for and acceptance of any State and Federal aid 

that may be available in connection with such acquisition; or to take any other 
action relating to the foregoing. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and The 
Recreation/Community Schools Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the sum of $780,000.00 
be hereby appropriated for the purpose of acquiring by purchase or otherwise all or 
part of the following described parcels of land for conservation and/or recreation 
purposes: 



120 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 



SITE #1 

FISH BROOK WETLANDS 



Lot 4 of Map 146, 12 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Anne Mooradian 

and Sarkes Arakelian; 

Lot 1 of Map 170, 1 acre, more or less, supposed to be owned by Robert A. and 

Catherine T. Park; 

Lot 2 of Map 170, 3 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Robert A. and 

Catherine T. Park; 

Lot 4 of Map 170, 38 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by John and Mary 

Boloian ; 

Lot 2 of Map 146, 20 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by John and Mary 

Boloian; 

Lot 1 of Map 169, 12 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Irving and Shirley 

Leof f ; 

Lot 2 of Map 169, 18 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by James T. and 

Marie D. Murphy; 

Lot 3 of Map 189, 12 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Ernest J. and 

Bette L. Henderson; 

Lot 7 of Map 172, 12.5 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by David and 

Catherine A. Netti; 

Lot 3A of Map 172, 1.84 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Boston & Maine 

RR; 

Lot 3 of Map 172, 5.70 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by J. Terrance 

and Patricia A. Sullivan 

SITE #2 

WOOD HILL-BALD HILL 

Lot 1 of Map 172, 5,800 SF, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain Realty 

Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 2 of Map 193, 43.5 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr . L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 3 of Map 193, 46,845 SF, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lots 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 

24 of Map 193, total of 21 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 1 of Map 194, 31.15 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr . L. John Davidson and Louis Kane: 

Lot 3 of Map 194, 35.655 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lots 4, 5, 6 and 7 of Map 194, total 143,951 SF, more or less, supposed to be owned 

by High Plain Realty Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 1 of Map 209, 39 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain Realty 

Trust, Tr . L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 5 of Map 210, 16.04 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 2 of Map 209, 3 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Antonio Dispirito; 

Lot 6 of Map 210, 10.32 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by High Plain 

Realty Trust, Tr. L. John Davidson and Louis Kane; 

Lot 8 of Map 218, 22 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Baker's Meadow 

Realty Tr. (Neal Mitton, Herbert Schurian, Joseph A. Watson and Arthur Williams). 

SITE #3 

SACRED HEART PROPERTY 

Lot 2 of Map 36, 3.8 acres, more or less; Lot 2A of Map 36, 1,026 SF , more or less; 
Lot 7 of Map 36, 8.4 acres, more or less; Lot 8 of Map 36, 8.6 acres, more or less; 
Lot 88A of Map 36, 21,120 SF , more or less; 

Lot 3 of Map 37, 1.2 acres, more or less; Lot 4 of Map 37, 2.2 acres, more or less 

121 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 



SITE # 3 Cont'd 
SACRED HEART PROPERTY 



and Lot 5 of Map 37, 2.5 acres, more or less, all supposed to be owned by the Order 
of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart of N.E., Inc. 

SITE #4 

SKUG RIVER WETLANDS 

Lot 4 of Map 30, 21 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Lillian Holt and 
Mrs. J. N. Kelman. 

Lot 1 of Map 30, 85.8 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by J. T. Raza and 
Richard R. Bergeron. 

Lot 1 of Map 31, 38 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Dennis and Ann 
Pettigrew, and Reginald and Belinda Mortimer. 

Lot 2 of Map 49, 5.77 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Margaret Johnson. 

SITE #5 

SHAWSHEEN RIVER FRONTAGE 

Lot 6 of Map 73, 2.690 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Granville and 
Elaine Cutler. 



. . . and that to raise such 
of the Selectmen, be hereby 
or from time to time pursuan 
to issue bonds or notes of t 
this issue shall be utilized 
(Sacred Heart Property) has 
to be subject to the approva 
Selectmen and the Conservati 
accept any State and Federal 
acquisition. 



appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
authorized to borrow the sum or $780,000.00 at one time 
t to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, and 
he Town therefore; that not more than $500,000.00 of 

for the acquisition of sites 1, 2, 4, 5 until Site 3 
been acquired; terms and conditions of all acquisitions 
1 of the Board of Selectmen; and that the Board of 
on Commission be hereby authorized to apply for and 

aid that may be available in connection with said 



A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board, 



The vote 



YES 419 



NO 204, voted by more than the 2/3 required. 



ARTICLE 48. 



To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 



to acquire by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, land 
in the Town of Andover identified as Lots No. 2, No. 2a, No. 7, No. 8, No. 88a and 
No. 91 on Assessors 's Map No. 36 and Lots No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 on Assessor's 
Map No. 37, together with the buildings thereon, and to see if the Town will vote 
to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any 
combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of money for said acquisitions. 

on petition of George J. Fantini, Jr. and others. 

Article 48 was defeated. 



The vote 



YES 207, 



NO 281 - less than the 2/3 as required. 



ARTICLE 49. 



To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 



to acquire by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, land in 
the Town of Andover identified as Lots No. 2, No. 2a, No. 7 and No. 8 on Assessor's 
Map No. 36 and Lots No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 on Assessor's Map No. 37, together with 
the buildings thereon, and to see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate a sum of money for said acquisition. 



122 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 

on petition of George J. Fantini, Jr. and others. 

Article 49 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 50 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$12,000.00 for the purpose of improving traffic circulation at Recreation Park, 
Abbot Street. 

Inserted at the request of the Recreation/Community Schools Committee. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

Article 50 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 51 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
or transfer from available funds $70,000.00 for the construction of tennis courts, 
a ski area, an erosion control program, and roadways in Andover Recreation Park, 
Abbot Street, Andover. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board, The Conservation Commission and The 
Recreation/Community Schools Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town raise by taxation 
and appropriate the sum of $46,000.00 for the construction of tennis courts and an 
erosion control program, Andover Recreation Park, Abbot Street, Andover, Massachu- 
setts. 

A written report was given by the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 52 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum 
of $931.43 to reimburse to James Duffy of Andover for his purchase of certain land 
alledgedly owned by the Town when such land was not, in fact, owned by the Town; 
and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition 
the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act to authorize the Town to pay said 
sum to Mr. James Duffy. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the sum of $931.43 be 
hereby appropriated to reimburse James Duffy and to meet said appropriation $412.53 
be transferred from the Tax Title account and $518.90 be raised by taxation and 
further that the Selectmen be authorized to petition the Massachusetts Legislature 
for a Special Act to authorize the Town to so reimburse James Duffy. 

ARTICLE 53 . To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following balances be 
lapsed and returned to Surplus Revenue 

To Article 53 Available Funds: 

Article 17 1970 Shawsheen School Playgrounds $392.42 

Article 46 1971 Road Drains 117.15 

Article 51 1974 Cross St. & High Plain Rd. , Repairs 25.83 

Article 14 1969 Public Safety Center .83 

Article 35 1973 Renovation Lodge 568.99 

Article 4A 1968 Land Acq. Tea Lots 4,476.00 

Article 15 1972 Install Road Drains 7.80 

Article 28 1969 Rental MVNB Parking 1.00 

Article 56 1971 Town Hall Parking 1,152.03 



123 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, APRIL 28, 1976 
Article IB 1972 Traffic Lights Lowell 66.24 



$6,809.19 

ARTICLE 54 . To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to 
use in free cash to reduce the 1976-77 tax rate and to affect appropriations 
voted at the 1976 Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Assessors be permitted 
to use $1,375.00 in Free Cash to reduce the 1976 Tax Rate and to offset appropria- 
tions voted at 1976 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 55 . To act upon the report of the TOWN OFFICERS. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Annual Report of the 
Town Officers covering the period from July 1, 1974 to December 31, 1975, as 
printed in the Annual Town Report, be accepted and placed on file. 

ARTICLE 56 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and endorse resolutions in 
recognition of services rendered by citizens in serving the Town of Andover. 

Article 56 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 11:40 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



ELDEN R. SALTER, CMC, 
TOWN CLERK 



124 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, AUGUST 16, 1976 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 578 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator at 7:40 P.M. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the Auditorium. 

Salute to the flag was led by William J. Dalton. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator be allowed 
to dispense with the reading of the Warrant and the return of service of the 
Constable, and that he be allowed to refer to the Articles by number as they appear 
in the Warrant . 

Essex, SS. August 9, 1976 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of 
the Town of Andover , have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days. 



Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$225,000.00, or any other sum, for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing or 
making extraordinary repairs to the high school by replacing and repairing all or 
portions of the roof thereof, and to determine whether such appropriation shall be 
raised by transfer of available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or to take any 
other action relating to the foregoing matters. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the sum of 
$189,000.00 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing 
or making extraordinary repairs to the High School by replacing or repairing all 
or portions of the roof thereof, and that to raise such appropriation, the sum of 
$189,000.00 shall be transferred from available funds in the Treasury. 

A written statement was given by the Andover Planning Board, in which they had 
voted, unanimously, to waive compliance with the reauirements of Article III, 
Section 3 (b) (3) of the Town By-Laws with regard to this Article. 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to file 
in behalf of the inhabitants of the Town in conformity with Public Law 94-369, or 
any other applicable Federal legislation, application(s ) for funds in form and 
manner required by the United States Government and to contract for and expend said 
funds; and, further, to see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the 
sum of $10,000.00 for permits, easements and any other necessary action in pre- 
paration for water main construction pursuant to said Public Law 94-369, or other 
applicable Federal legislation, or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED, unanimously that the Town 
Manager be hereby authorized to file in behalf of the inhabitants of the Town and 
in conformity with Public Law 94-369, (or any other applicable Federal legislation), 
an application or applications for funds in form and manner required by the United 
States Government and to contract for and expend said funds; and, further that the 

125 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, AUGUST 16, 1976 

sum of $10,000 be hereby appropriated for permits, easements and any other necessary 
action in preparation for water main construction, and lighting for Central Park 
pursuant to said Public Law 94-369, or other applicable Federal legislation said 
sum to be raised by a transfer from available funds in the Treasury. 

A written statement was given by the Andover Planning Board, in which they had 
voted, unanimously, to waive compliance with the requirements of Article III, 
Section 3 (b) (3) of the Town By-Laws with regard to this Article. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 8:15 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST 



OLGA PALENSKI 
ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 



126 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 4, 1976 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen on September 13, 1976, the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and 
assembled in the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Monday the fourth day 
of October, 1976 at 7:30 P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by William J. Dalton, Moderator at 8:00 P.M. 

Check Lists were used at the entrance and showed 242 voters admitted to the 
meeting, lacking the required quorum of 350. 

Chairman Milton Greenberg of the Board of Selectmen was granted permission by 
the Moderator to read into the records the following resolution: 

A BICENTENNIAL COMMENDATION 

WHEREAS, the Bicentennial of the American Revolution marks a special time in the 
history of the Town of Andover, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United 
States of America; and 

WHEREAS, the Bicentennial Committee in the Town of Andover organized and supported 
numerous highly successful functions as appropriate commemoration of our Nation's 
Bicentennial, including the selection of a Bicentennial logo; design, purchase 
and sale of exquisite silver and pewter medallions; house tours in October, 1975 
and May, 1976; a Founders' Day program reenacting on the Town Hall steps the sale 
of land by the Indians; a Bicentennial Parade on May 9, 1976; a Bicentennial Ball 
on May 21, 1976; a craft show; an extensive program throughout the school system 
emphasizing the history of Andover; a July 4th ecumenical service and breakfast; 
the making of the Bicentennial quilt; the reinstitution of the Andover Company of 
Militia; an architectural survey of historic buildings in cooperation with the 
Historical Commission; participation in the development of a regional bibliography 
of area historical documents; and commissioning the writing and publication of an 
historic booklet; and 

WHEREAS, NORMA A. GAMMON, Chairman of the Bicentennial Committee, served with great 
distinction in initiating and organizing a broad range of significant activities 
in celebration of the Bicentennial of the American Revolution in the Town of Andover; 
and 

WHEREAS, NORMA A. GAMMON; VIRGINIA H. COLE; FRANK DEMERS ; JOAN M. DILL; GEORGE W. 
GLENNIE; EDWARD M. HARRIS; WILLIAM E. HART; DONALD HAYES, JR.; DOROTHY S. HILL; 
BARBARA G. LAMPE ; JOHN D. LEWIS; JAMES W. McLEOD ; GARY C. RALPH; BARBARA T. 
SAULNIER; DOROTHY M. SHERRERD ; HELEN A. WATKINSON; and SIDNEY P. WHITE contributed 
significantly to the work of the Bicentennial Committee; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the voters of the Town of Andover at a Special Town 
Meeting held on Monday evening, October 4, 1976 hereby commend NORMA GAMMON and 
the Bicentennial Committee for their extraordinary contribution to the celebration 
of the Bicentennial of the American Revolution in the Town of Andover. 



Issued this fourth day of October, 1976. 
TOWN MODERATOR 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



s/ William J. Dalton 
William J. Dalton 



TOWN CLERK 



s/ Elden R. Salter 
Elden R. Salter 





Wilton 


Greenberg 


s/ 


Alan 


F. 


French 


Al 


a.n F. 


French 


s/ 


Janet 


D. 


Lake 



Janet D. Lake 



127 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 4, 1976 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
s/ Susan T. Poore 



Susan T. Poore 

s/ Richard J. Bowen 
Richard J. Bowen 



Upon motion made by Chairman Greenberg and duly seconded by Selectman French, 
it was VOTED to adjourn Sine Di due to a lack of quorum. 

ATTEST: 



ELDEN R. SALTER 
TOWN CLERK 



128 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 
DECEMBER 31, 1976 

State Equalized Valuation $454,200,000.00 

Borrowing Capacity 5% 22,710,000.00 

Town Debt as of December 31, 1976 13,900,000.00 

Less Debt Outside Debt Limit ; 

1957-South School $ 40,000.00 

1963-Accelerated Sewer 280,000.00 

1966-New Senior High School 1,755,000.00 

1966-Fish Brook 360,000.00 
1967-Water Mains, North St., & 

Bancroft Reservoir 300,000.00 

1967-Bancroft School 945,000.00 

1967-New High School Additional 450,000.00 

1968-West Elem. Additional 1,330,000.00 
1968-Water Mains, Industrial Park 

& Bancroft Loop 90,000.00 

1970-Water Mains-Lowell St. 60,000.00 

1971-Water Treatment Plant 1,950,000.00 

1973-Shawsheen-Doherty Renovations 685,000.00 

1974-Sewer West Andover 90,000.00 

1975-West Andover, Sewer Balance 2,200,000.00 

1976-Water Storage Reservoir 875,000.00 

$ 11,410,000.00 

Town Debt Inside Debt Limit ; $ 2,490,000.00 

Borrowing Capacity as of December 31, 1976 $ 20,220,000.00 

Less Debt Inside Debt Limit-Appropriation Voted 
but not Bonded: 

Elm Street Water Mains $ 140,000.00 



129 



Town Debt as of December 31, 1976; 



DATE OF BONDS 



OUTSIDE 



1/15/57 

11/15/63 

4/1/66 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/71 

7/15/73 

7/15/74 

12/15/75 

12/15/76 



South School 

Accelerated Sewer 

New Senior High School 

Fish Brook 

Water Mains-North St. & Bancroft Rd. 

Bancroft School 

New Senior High Additional 

West Elementary Additional 

Water-Industrial Park & Bancroft Loop 

Water Mains-Lowell St. 

Water Treatment Plant 

Shawsheen-Doherty Renovations 

Sewer-West Andover 

West Andover-Sewer Balance 

Water Storage Reservoir 



40, 

280, 

1,755, 

360, 

300, 

945, 

450, 

1,330, 

90, 

60, 

1,950, 

685, 

90, 

2,200, 

875. 



000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 



$11,410,000.00 



DATE OF BONDS 



INSIDE 



4/1/66 

12/1/67 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/70 

5/15/75 

12/1/75 

12/15/76 



Municipal Building 

Public Safety Center 

Sewer-Industrial Park & Bancroft Loop 

Streets-Industrial Park 

East Junior High Remodeling 

Land Acquisition Conservation 

Sewer-Summer & Chestnut St. 

Public Safety Center 

Doyle Land Acquisition 

Plans Water System 

Conservation Land Purchase 



495, 

300, 

295, 

30, 

40, 

120, 

80, 

40, 

180, 

130, 

780, 



000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 



$ 2,490,000.00 



130 



vO CM 




00 

ON 


CO 

ON 


.-i 
<-< 


CM 

CM 


vO 
r-l 


T-l 


ON 


o 

CO 


vO 
CM 


o <!• 
O r- 


00 
00 


00 

s* 


CM 


O 


O 
m 


O 
CO 


o 
o 


o 
o 


r^ O r-l 

co m st 


O 
vo 


o 

VO 


vO 

st 


st 

o 


CO r^ 
r-~ on 


CM 

CO 


O 

o 


oo 

st 


cm co 
in st 

t~- vO 


m 

ON 

r-i 


CM 

vO 
CO 


m 
m 

CM 


ON 

00 

i-i 


ON 

CO 

1-1 


ON 
O 


in 
m 

CO 


i-l 
r-l 


CM 
St 


CM 

in 

ON 


O oo 
O r» 
m st 


ON 


ON 

vo 

1-1 


i-i 

CM 


r-l 
CO 

vo 


O 

m 
st 


O 
r-l 
CO 


o 

r-l 

vO 


o 
m 

vo 


st m on 

CM CM CM 

i-4 00 r-l 


CM 

O 


CM 
CO 
ON 


CO 

O 

CO 


r-l 
CO 

in 


St ON 

on m 

CO ON 


vO 
1-^ 
00 


o 
o 
o 


vO 

m 
m 


CM CM 








!-< 


CO 


i-i 




vO 

r-t 


CM 


00 


r-l o 

i-i 






i-l 




CM 
CM 


CM 


1-^ 




i-i m r-i 

CM st 00 
CM CO 


m 

CM 


CM 

in 


CM 




ON VO 
CO 00 

1-1 




m 


oo 
<t 
o 



II <o- 



o o 
o o 



omooNOOoooocovocMvo 

OstOONr^OOOOvOCMr-lvO-d - 

Or-ior-ioocoooooNONinooi^ 

OCMOOOOOr-ICOOvOstCMmCMCM 

m m coco i-i Oi-ico vo 



vO 
r-l 


VO O 
ON o 


o 

o 


CO 
CO 


r-l 
ON 

in 


co m 

O CM 


o 

CM 

r-l 


m 
<t 

vO 


CN 

CO 






o 
m 
i 



inoocMONOcMr-~oovor^.ONoo 
voOr-icoinvor~-in<i-r-i»d-r~oNi— i 



r*»r-»ONOcovocMvD 

StstOOr-ieNi-lvOSt 



m o 
r- o 
on S 



CMt^-OONCOr-ICMOOOOi-lvOOOi-lON 
StCOr-li-li-4vOVO00i-ISti-ICM00CO 

r-l r-l r-l 00 HIT! <J 



ONCMCMr^ONinoor^ 

st CO O CN m CM CM 
CO r-l co r-» 



VO st CM CM CO I s - ON 

m m o st cm vo co 

co r*^ vo i—i co on on 

CO ON <t CO vO CM st 

CM ON r-l O ON 



CO 

< 
















ON 




O 


O 




St 




m 








o 




00 






r-l 




in 


o 




O 


r^ 


• — s 

in 


















ON 




o 


r^ 




o 




CNI 








o 




st 






vO 




CN 


o 




o 


o 


CM 


















• 






• 








• 


















• 




• 


• 








« 




CO 














o 




o 


CO 




CO 




m 








o 




CO 






o 




r~- 


o 




o 


st 


m 




H 














<t 




o 


CO 




ON 




r^ 








o 




O 






vO 




co 


o 




o 


CO 


i^. 




S3 
H 


M 


















CO 


CO 








CO 








St 




vO 










O 


o 




o 


ON 


CO 




CO 


















•* 










* 








«• 




*» 










* 


#» 






** 


i 




o 


















St 










^^ 








r^. 




ON 










00 


o 




m 


St 


Vw - 




p-l 




























i 












CM 










o 


CN 






r~- 


■Jc 




En 

o 


w 


















































1-1 








r-l 






P 














■co- 












































+ 






Q 
O 
H 




r-l CM 


m vo <t i-i o 


ON 


1-1 


ON 


ON 


o 


O 


VO 


CO 


r-l 


r-l 


CO 


m 


o 


O 


O 


r^ 


o 


ON 


st 


VO 


ON 


CN 


in 


o 


CO 




r-l 








o r~ 


st vo co m m 


m 


o 


CO 


CM 


m 


O 


CM 


1-1 


O 


CM 


r-i 


CM 


CO 


O 


o 


CO 


in 


o 


O 


O 


r^ 


vO 


CM 


CO 


st 




00 






to 
U 


m 


O vo 


in m o •*» vo 


o 


r-» 


m 


CM 


CM 


o 


CO 


<t 


o 


i-l 


CO 


00 


o 


O 


o 


st 


m 


CM 


Ov 


m 


m 


St 


st 


o 


vo 




l-» 






r^ w 


r-l O 


oo m m cm r^ 


CM 


CO 


r^ 


CO 


00 


o 


CM 




ON 


00 


in 


vO 


1-1 


i-M 


m 


CM 


CM 


r-l 


CO 


CO 


o 


CN 


ON 


CO 


st 




ON 






~»~ U 


vo m 


r-l CO CM I-l ON 


vo 


CO 


r^ 


CO 


00 


m 


r-l 




1-1 


CO 


vo 


m 


CO 


VO 


vO 


VO 


00 


r-l 


CO 


ON 


00 


m 


CM 


o 


ON 




00 






I-l 


<-* 21 


n n 
























































»• 






co 2 


CM CM 


i-l <N 


r-l 




vo 


CM 


CO 


r-l 


VO 






1-4 




CO 


CM 


r-^ 




St 


m 


St 


CO 


ON 


CM 




ON 


CO 






00 






*"^* i_3 










i-i 


















CM 








1-1 


st 


00 


CM 


st 






CN 


VO 






av 








CM <j 




































CM 


CO 




















00 






CO 


r-l M 


O O 


o o o o o 


O 


o 


O 


O 


1-1 


r~- 


o 




o 


O 


O 












O 










00 








o 


+ 






En 


3 


O O 


o o o o o 


VO 


o 


o 


O 


00 


r-^ 


o 




o 


m 


o 












m 










00 








o 








< 


O O 


o o o o o 


St 


o 


O 


o 


m 


CM 


o 




o 


00 


o 












m 










CN 








o 








PM 


O O 


m m o o o 


St 


o 


O 


O st 


O 


o 




o 


ON 


o 












CN 










CO 








o 








r-l 


o o 


CM CM O O 


in 


CO 


o 


O 


00 


CO 


m 




CM 


m 


vO 












00 










m 








o 








O 

w 

Cm 
CO 

TJ 


u 
































































s 


I-l I-l 


I-l I-l 






o 


r-l 


r^ 


r-l 


m 




















in 


















m 








I-l 










I-l 




























st 


























Prf 






































CO 


























p-l 


<n- 






























































3 
cfl 


























•H 
















CU 












































i-i 






X 








E^ 


>, 






r*> 
























>< 
PC 

w 

[-1 




















CO 


4-> 


>> 


to 


>N 


>, 




rl 


u 


>> 















































Cu 


co 


u 


u 


u 


rl 


f>N 


<u 


tu 


U 




r-l 










































•H 


CU 


CU 


CO 


CU 


CU 


u 


4-1 


4-J 


CU 




fr 




























CO CO 














U 


u 


4-1 


1-4 


4-J 


4-J 


<u 


<D 


CU 


4-1 




B 
























1 

w 

CJ 






oj ai 














c 


CU 


CU 


o 


CU 


CU 


4J 


B 


B 


cu 




cu 


























i-i 


N N 












0) 


•r-l 


4-1 


e 


X 


B 


B 


a) 


CU 


cu 


B 




a 


























o 


•rl -H CO 












rl 


U 


a 


CU 


o 


CU 


CU 


B 


u 


o 


cu 




& 


























o 


rl rl CD 












CO 


CM 


h-l 


o 


to 


CJ 


u 


CU 






u 




n 




























X 


PM PM N 












14-1 














u 


X 


cu 






T3 




























o • 


•i-l 












1-4 


<U 


CU 


X 


c 


0) 


X 




o 


c 


cu 




OJ 
























H 


E»4 


CO -u 


U r-l r-l I-l 












tu 


> 


> 


u 


o 


> 


o 


X 


u 


•H 


> 




r-l 
























CO 


0i 


a 


ao oh 












3 


o 


o 


u 


•rl 


o 


1-1 


CO 


3 


4-J 


o 




X 
























2 


c cu 


<u o o 












i 


rl 


u 


3 


4-1 


rl 


3 


•H 


X 


CO 


rl 




cfl 
























M 


a> o 


Q X X 60 • 


• 










>nO 


o 


6 


CO 


e> 


6 


rl 


u 


3 


o 




CO 










r-4 














u 


<u 


y y e co 


CO 




VU 


CO 


<D 


u 






> 




CO 




60 






•rl 








CO 


cfl 




CO 


>, 










M 


X <-i 


I-l CO CO -rl • 


• 




u 


U 


U 


CU 


60 


60 




M 


60 




PM 


4-1 


3 


60 




Q 








u 


■rl 




rl 


u 










Pn 


CO O 


O r-l M 


M 




CO 


CU 


ca 


4-1 


C 


C 


X 


CU 


c 


X 




CO 


< 


c 












OJ 


u 




CJ 


cfl 










w 


3 o 


O X X i-l • 


• 


r-l 


4-1 


S 


M-l 


a) 


•H 


•r-l 


4-1 


CO 


•rl 


4-1 


4-J 


•r-l 




•rl 




X) 








3 


o 




s 


u 










s 


cd xi 


X 60 60 <D > 


> 


CU 


r-l 


o 


r-l 


B 


1-4 


rl 


3 


C 


U 


3 


CO 


rl 


• 


rl 




CU 











B 




o 


X 










w 


X O 


CJ -H -rl P< • 


• 


3 


OJ 


I-l 


CU 


a) 


D- 


P- 


o 


o 


0- 


O 


CU 


X 


4J 


a- 




60 








r-l 


3 




1-4 


•H 










pq 


CO CO 


CO EC EC CO <J 

C 
r-l 

c o 
coy 


c 


fa 


X 


En 


s 


u 


CO 


to 


to 


u 


CO 

co 

rl 


to 


3 


a 


to 


to 


r-l 


<! 

CJ 




3 


•rl 
4-1 
cfl 

4-1 
•rl 

i-4 

•rl 


3 

o 

!m 
CJ 
CO 

Ed 

CO 


En 

■-I 
CO 

•H 
U 

B 








En 


rd 

>s 

r-4 

•H 

En 

E^ 

CJ 






4-1 

c 

cu 








Oil c 


1-1 




CO 
















o 


CU 


d) 


CJ 


CU 


cu 


CO 


1-1 




X 


OJ 


cu 


3 


CU 




rM 






B 








•rl 60 -H 











T3 


T3 










1-1 


u 


rl 


I-l 


rl 


1-1 


ftrQ 


3 


CO 


1-1 


g 




o 




CJ 












00 CJ tJ 


o 




>. 




C 


C 






u 




En 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•rl 


CO 


O 


X 


cfl 




• 


c 




CJ 






co 








CD hJ 


c 




o 




o 


O 






CU 




1 


O 


u 


u 


a 


u 


o 


1-M 


•rl 


cu 


to 


CJ 


< 


cfl 




rl 






3 






a 


(J 


•rl 




p 




i e 






& 




C 












c 


•rl 


4J 


pi 




I-l 




M 


X 


o 






•r-l 









• CO 


hJ 




J 




PN 








o 




o 


r-l 


r-l 


r-l 


rM 


r-l 


•rl 


CO 


Cfl 




CJ 


co 


CO 


3 


4-J 








T> 






n 


c > 










CB 


CO 






1-1 




4J 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


u 


> 


N 


U 


■-4 


> 


3 


CO 


IM 


• 






<J 






•o 


cfl • a> 


• 




^3 




Pd 


Pi 






En 




60 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


PM <i 


•rl 


cfl 


4-1 


T3 


•rl 


c 


CO 


Ed 












s-i u 


>n u <i3 C 


>-} 


U 










U 


lM 


I 


a 


c 


4-1 


4J 


4J 


4-J 


4-1 


1 


1 


rl 


3 


•rl 


JM 


r-4 


h-l 


3 








4J 




CO 


cfl a) 


O -H -i-l 




o 


•T3 


4-J 


• 


• 


0) 


0J 


c 


o 


•r-l 


a> 


<U 


CU 


<D 


OJ 


0) 


a) 


■rl 




H 


OJ 


CJ 




O 


CO 






•rl 




c 


x a 


4-> U )-l «3 i-l 


nj 


1-1 


•H 


u 


l-J 


i-l 


3 


3 


CU 


4-1 


rl 


p. 


Cu 


0-, 


0- 


O-n-l 


r-l 


X 


4-1 




r-l 


c 


rj 


EC 


CJ 






X» 




!2 


o a 


r-l C vU <D 


S 


> 


> 


2 






o 


o 


r-l 


4-4 


(-I 


u 


iM 


u 


rl 


rl 


3 


3 


cfl 


CO 


X 


r-l 


u 


[s 




B 






3 




t— 


•H H 


o o i • B 

EC CJ <3 < Ed 


^ 


a) 


tfl 


B 


• 


• 


1-1 


1-4 


r-l 


CO 


CO 


<1J 


CU 


CU 


CU 


0) 


o 


o 


4-1 


O 


CO 


Cfl 


o 


o 


• 


CO 






<; 




En 


cc a 


w 


H 


Q 


to 


3 


Ed 


En 


En 


< 


ai 


En 


CM 


CM 


Cm 


CM 


Cm 


H 


H 


to 


Cm 


H 


pq 


a 


H 


< 


^ 






? 



131 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 

July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976 

GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



Local Aid and Agency Funds: 
Tax Reimb. 

Bureau Local Tax Reimb. Ch 17 
Standard for Pedlers Lie. 
Corp. & Tax Ind Clause 37 
Veterans Benefits 
Loss of Taxes - State Properties 
School Transportation (Chap 71 - Sec 7A 

(Chap 71 - 57A 
Construction of School Projects 
School Lunch Program 
Regional Public Libraries 

Vocational Education - Occup. Ed. Chap 74 
Educ. Deaf & Blind 
Bicentennial 

D.P.W. Hwy Impr. - Sch Zone 
Education 

School Aid - Chap 70 & 71 
School Aid - Chap 69 & 71 
Lottery 
Hwy - Chap 58 
Hwy & Trans Div Ch 825 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Licenses : 
Dog Fees 
Liquor 
Marriage 
Miscellaneous 

Fines 

Special Assessments: 

Apportioned Sewer Paid in Advance 



1 

16 

62 

61 

181 

316 

170 

64 

1 

3 

12 

2 

1,748 

167 

110 

124 

161 



,267.51 
175.00 

25.00 
,050.00 
,870.11 
,602.01 
,518.48 
293.00 
,444.26 
,744.81 
,782.27 
,430.00 

89.50 
,019.00 
,650.00 
,774.97 
,495.57 
,869.00 
,684.45 
,880.98 
,421.68 



937,297.23 
152,173.42 



2,443.50 

20,050.00 

864.00 

7,088.20 



3,979.49 



3,211,087.60 



1,089,470.65 



30,445.70 
17,825.80 



132 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 

July 1, 1975 TO June 30, 1976 

GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES (con't) 

Apportioned Sewer Added to Taxes: 

Current Year 23,113.93 

Previous Years 41.85 

Apportioned Water Paid in Advance 537.50 

Apportioned Water Added to Taxes: 

Current Year 2,461.11 

Previous Years 124.08 30,257.96 

General Government: 

Rent of Town Property 5,912.00 

Miscellaneous 15,664.00 21,576.00 

Protection of Persons and Property: 

Ambulance Fees 4,592.50 

Building Inspector 44,616.00 

Electrical Inspector 6,945.00 

Miscellaneous 2,355.20 58,508.70 

Health and Sanitation: 

Miscellaneous 15,213.15 15,213.15 

Highways : 

Supervision of Tree Trimming 5,046.00 5,046.00 

Veterans Services: 

Reimbursements - Individuals 897,79 

School: 

Summer School Tuition 1,340.00 

Other Tuition 3 228.91 

Rentals and Other 975.62 5 544.53 

Recreation: 

Self Supporting Programs 25,148.87 25,148.87 



133 



July 1, 1975 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 



TO 



June 30, 1976 



GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS 1 ESTIMATES (con 8 to) 



Public Service Enterprises: 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Liens Added to Taxes: 

Current Year 

Previous Years 



696,611.58 
15,653,26 

37,439.04 
338.87 



750,042.75 



Cemeteries: 
Care of Lots 
Foundations 
Tombs and Interments 



4,00 

982.00 

2,600.00 



3,586.00 



Libraries: 

Fines and Sales 



1,517.93 



Interest: 
Committed 

Certificates of Deposit 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Taxes and Assessments 
Tax Titles 
Revenue Sharing 



8,051.68 

282,395.73 

1,269.56 

24,185.01 

944.47 

12,502.59 



329,349.04 



Farm Animal Excise Taxes: 
Current Year 



774.65 



774.65 



5,596,293.12 



134 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 



July 1, 1975 



TO 



June 30, 1976 



GROUP II 
RECEIPTS NOT INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



Tax Title Redemptions 

Tax Title Costs 

Dog Funds - Care and Custody 

Insurance Claims 

Workmens Compensation Refunds 

Refunds : 

Departmental 

Petty Cash 
Chapter 90 Aid to Highways: 

State Aid 
Sale of Equipment 
Recycling: 

Paper 

Glass 

Metal 

Other 
Reimbursement - Anti-Trust Case 
Insurance Dividend 
Miscellaneous 
Telephone Commissions 
Forfeiture of Deposits 



10,085,67 

83.55 

1,112,00 

8,378.00 

4,276.44 

3,075.82 
150.00 



921.16 

8,721.33 

4,234.92 

240.96 

1,219,71 

1,256.24 

2,429.00 

421.78 

713.77 

300,00 



47,620.35 



135 



July 1, 1975 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 

TO June 30, 1976 



GROUP III 
AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Personal Property Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Real Estate Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Dog Licenses from County 
Dog Licenses to County 
Off Street Parking Meters 
Sale of Dogs 
School Lunch Program 
Andover Athletic Program 
Cemetery Sale of Lots 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Interest: 

Spring Grove Cemetery Funds 

Trust and Investment Funds 

Flower Funds 
Municipal Debt: 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 

Bond Issue 

Premium on Bond Issue 
Non-Revenue Cash Investments 
Revenue Cash Investments 
Fed Rev Sh Cash Invest. 
Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross and Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

Group Insurance - Optional 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

United Fund 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 

Withholding Taxes - State 
Miscellaneous 
Sewer Charges 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 
Guarantee Deposits 
Tailings 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



511,999.44 
208.15 



11,526,400.71 
96,212.75 



12,514.24 
5,798.74 
2,780.45 



512,207.59 



11,622,613.45 

4,846.95 

6,472.65 

1,964.00 

138.00 

309,479.99 

16,607.66 

2,425.00 

3,600.00 



21,093.43 

500,000.00 

2,488,700.00 

9,968.18 

2,450,000.00 

25,058,332.25 

1,493,000.00 



172 

7 

12 

22 

4 

1,538 

433 

13 

200 

2 

13 

425 



,972.65 
,294.03 
,758.11 
,302.50 
,623.24 
,746.98 
,270.70 
,925.38 
,846.15 
,751.77 
,000.00 
199.37 
,362.00 



136 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

REVENUE 

FOR THE PERIOD OF 
July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976 

GROUP III 
AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS ( con ' t . ) 



School Aid: 

Title I - P.L. 874 

P.L. 93-380 - Proj. 76-009-054 

P.L. 93-380 - Proj. 76-009-046 



Title I - E. S. E. A. 




Title II - E. S. E. A. 




Title III - P.L. 85-864-Proj. 


7404M 


Title III - P.L. 86-854-Proj. 


7505S 


Title VI 




Title VIB - P.L. 91-230 




Title I - P.L. 89-313 




Title IVB 




Title II P.L. 89-10 




P.L. 864 - Proj. 75449S 





Police Off Duty Details 
Police Legal Advisor 
Sale of Trash Bags 
Meals Tax 

Civil Rights - State 
Mini-Bus Grant - State 
Loan - Hewlett Packard 
Wood Memorial 
Tax Title Escrow 
Highway - Chap 825-74 



13,288.00 
7,000.00 

20,000.00 

67,869.00 
5,219.13 
1,018.17 
3,966.12 
7,600.00 

17,600.00 

2,400.00 

4,134.42 

7,542.50 

153.25 



157,790.59 

98,491.65 

7,000.00 

62,092.00 

1,369.75 

150.00 

1,200.00 

63,260.00 

108,037.25 

60.61 

87,398.00 

47,936,351.88 



Group I - 5,596,293.12 

Group II - 47,620.35 

Group III - 47,936,351.88 
53,580,265.35 



137 



01 




Ol 


u 




OS 


c 






a 


o 


■ 


rH 


■u 


u 



n 


o 


0) 


r-t 


■p 


> 


ffl 




01 


ca 




C 


I) 

o 




£ 


c 






a 





• 


rH 


■p 


(0 


a 




(1) 


a 




K 



O CO 

en t- 


CM O 


oo 


01 Tf 

o m 

r-t rH 


o o 

rH CO 

00 


o 

r-t 




CM 


CO 



•o 

a 


ft 



OH CO CO 
01 CM 00 00 
(DM tJ< ■* 



O CO 
O t- 
00 CO 



C" CO 
01 

cm m 



u 

0) 

w G 
10 o 

c t, 

Ot <H 



01 o 
C -P 

a 



ft m 
o c 
u o 

ft-H 

ftp 
< cd 



a) 
o 
c e io 

cd O t- 

H 1,0) 

n m rH 

m 



O rH 

O •* 
oo co 



oo oo 

r-t CM 



r-t CO 
O 01 



cm co 
to oo 



cm oo 
■* oo 



oo o 
o o 



t» CM CO CM 

O rH 00 O 

<-t rH t- 



■0< rH 
00 t- 

CM t- 
tO 
10 






oo t» 
■* 00 


00 O 

co to 


CM CM 

oo t» 


00 l> 

co to 


00 CM 
in r-t 


O 00 

o •* 


CM O 

oi O 


to 01 

rH C- 


CM tD 

t- m 


O 0) 
O 00 


01 t- 

CO r-t 

oo o 


CO 01 
CM rH 

CO oi 


U1 CM 
01 o 

CNJ rH 


t- m 

r^ 00 

cn in 


m ti< 

CM r-t 


O CO 

o in 
m t- 


CM 00 
Ol 01 
to 00 


Tf CM 
to ■* 
01 to 


00 o 

t- rH 

o P- 


CM t- 

m t» 

00CM 


01 CO 
r-t r-t 


•* 


CM 05 

in 


oo i-t 

in r-t 


t» oo 

T}< r-t 


cm to 

<-t CQ 


CM Tf 
CM 


rH r-t 
rH CM 


oi co 

r-t CO 


CM 00 



o o 
o o 


o o 
o to 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o m 


o o 
o o 


O 00 
O TJ< 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o m 


o to 
o in 


o m 
o oo 


co m 

m r-t 
01 CO 


O O) 
O r-t 
CM 0) 


t- 01 

Ol 0) 
tD i-t 


m oo 

CM Ol 

o m 


rH O 

■^ CO 

Tfl r-t 


O CO 

o m 
m t- 


CO o 

oi m 

tD Ol 


t- o 

tD r-t 

oi co 


o o 

in r-t 

oo t- 


CM CM 

in o 
oo Tf 


oi co 

r-l rH 


r-t Tfl 


CO 01 

m 


Ol H 

in r-t 


00 01 

■* rH 


cm to 

r-t CM 


CM ■* 
CM 


r-t CM 
r-t CM 


r-t CO 

CO CO 


CM Ol 



o to 

o m 

Tj* o 

tp m 

o r-t 







to 




0) 






m 








01 


c 


oi 






01 











01 


CJ 






o 




H 






a 


-H 


m 




•H 


m 


2 




> 


p 


> 


01 




> 


oi 


W 


t. 


rl 


o 


fcl 


01 




rl 


7) 







0) 


ii 


0) 


a 




(11 


C 


2 


P 


CO rH 


t/1 


0) 


rl 


ro 


(1) 


OS 


rt 









a 


CO 




D. 


W 

> 


rl 


rH 

cd 


CO rH 
til 


=3 


b0 rH 

a cd 


3 


O T3 


c 


"H 


c 




c 


c 




O 














s* 


id 


a 


rl 






tn 




01 


(11 




m 


(1) 


-1 




i< 


■n 


ti J2 




t* 


J3 


< 


c 


& 


b 


01 


■p 


c 


fi 


•»-> 


K 


* 


a ft o 


* 


O 


UJ 


o 


















Z H 




OP 






t- 







oi m 


o o 


•* 01 


oo m 


t~ o 


o o 


o o 


o in 


to O 


o o 


O rH 


o in 


C~ Ol 


o C~ 


t- co 


o o 


r-t in 


f r-t 


o to 


o oo 


•* CO 


CM r-t 


00 r-t 


oo m 


Ol r-t 


m o 


CM Ol 


CO CM 


co m 


o o 



o oi in rH 



to 

c 
o 

•H 

■p 






c 


cd 






o 


rl 






■H 


+» 






to 


to 10 


10 10 rl 01 10 tfl 


to to to to 


tn co 


■rt 01 


01 01 01 to 01 


bo 


■H 


DO U 


oio o u <j s-i u o 


o o c o 


g u 


'H 


tO -H tfl -H tfl 3 -H to O 'H tfl t< J) 


•rl tfl -H to -H -H 


01 B -H 0) 


OS > 


0+J>0+J>0U)>0(fl>0 >0 


> > T3 > 


O > 


U 


tfl+JrltnarltOfdrltntflrltO rltO 


rl tfl -O rl tfl rH rl 


10 O rl 01 


•a oi 


C-H0Ccd0C00C00C C 


a b C -H 


B B 


W C3 CO 


0SCO0-PCO0LtCO0tOCO0rHCO0 

a 1 a c ah ftto c. <u ft 


co cd co p co 
ft ft 03 


C CO 


M Cd 


ft O ft 


rH r-t 

CJ o) cd 


XOrHMDrHrl 1 H 1< < H « «1 H « Jj 

WUaWOcdWricdW cdWccdWfci 


rH M CQ rH M rH 
Cd W Cd W rH cd 


W +J cd W 


zee 


C OC OB <h c PC 


c bo c cd c 


cd B 


woo 


lilllOlitlOlifOhOOliOOhH 


O U C O rl ft 


U > fci 


a -h to 


0OtO0<tO0Otfl0 tO0UtO0O 


tfl -H CO -H 10 


fci CO 


< -P rl 


XlCrlXl d£ tl ><£T) r£ I-lXl 


u -c c h s: u u 


J2 rl x: 


O 0) 
tu 01 ft 


Prd0+JB0+ J rH0-Pria>+>CO)+>O 

OaftOsftOrHftOcdftOSftOS 


■!-> C ■!-> -H 

ft O td ft O a ft 


+> CO 01 *> 
O E ft O 


fc< rH 


■H O O o o 


rH D 





< w 

E- 


fe H O M H H 


ft s 


CJ 



138 



« 
o 

C O t» 

oS P t- 

iH 01 







> 


oj 




(i) 


U 




OS 


c 






01 







|H 


p 


rl 


ra 




3 


CQ 




DO 


OJ 






o 







C 





3 


01 -P 


C 


iH 




a> 


OJ 




> 


CO 




m 

BS 

•o 

c 


oj 




3 


CJ 




1*, 


c 







rt 


p 




rH 




to 


03 




a) 


CD 




cc 


to- 






ol 






■a 






c 






a; 






a 







iH 


CO 
CM 


o i> 

o o 


CO o 
» to 


l> o 

00 O 


co 

CM 


o 
co 


CO 
CO 

in 


■* 


CD CO 
CO 


00 o 
ci © 


iH 
iH 
CO 




r-l 






CM 
CO 


CO 



OJ 

01 01 
P |H 

r 0-H 

E-l 0) 

> 

< 



U 
<0 

■H B 
Ifl O 

c u 



u 

a> 

<H 

ta o 

c -p 



01 

in 




O CO 
O 00 


N O 
CM "* 


CO o 

|H O 


CO 

to 


CM 
OJ 
CO 


1-1 

CO 
CO 


CO CO 
01 CO 

» l> 


00 CO 
IM 00 
CD f- 


r-l O 

m o 

Tfl O 


CO 

m 
eg 
















in 

CM 


r> oi 


CO 


in o 

iH 


co 
to 


o 
o 


o 
m 


o o 

o 01 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


01 
00 


o 

o 


CM 
01 


O CO 

o to 

00 ■> 


in o 

00 o 
05 iH 


o o 
m o 


co 
o> 
l-< 
















CO 


O 01 

o 
o 

o 
o 


CO iH 


00 o 
CO r-i 


oo 

r-l 

in 

o 
o 

o 
o 



u in 
a c 
o o 

U -H 

a-p 

a « 
< 



OJ 

u 

c B m 

oi o >> 

iH u OJ 

«i <H r-l 

CO 



o 
o 


o 
o 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


co 

CO 
00 


O CO 
O 01 
00 CO 


in o 
in o 

» r-l 


o o 
in m 

O CO 


CM 

m 
co 
















CM 


t~ 00 


CO r-l 


00 0) 
CO 


r-l 

c- 



e 

— OJ 

p s 

- a 
c o 

OH J| » 
tlllllll 
"-' > 01 o 

SC -H 
a> > 



o o 
2; -h 

w u u i-i 
o +> a eg 

< w ss u 

3 -P P 

hXlO B 

in a oa 

CO 



01 Ofl-H 

OJ c > 

01 •H h 

a iiigi 

OJ < CO 

a 

o 

O (4 

a 

dH 
0) -H CO 

•C o t. 

p a a> 

O 3(S 
O 
U 



a U 

WWW O oi 5 



OJ 

o 

01 01 i-l 
OJr-l > 
0) 05 U 

C 0J OJ 

aj ftco 
a a 

■OJrH 

ot 

<H C 
hOO 
OJ 01 

r -a u 

O a ft 
o 
co 



01 

bfl OJ 

c o 

CO -H -H (0 

m oi > cj 

to ot u in 

a xj a> n 

oj u ta aj 
a 



ft u 
8S, 

U rH 

OJ (4 

J3 (h 

■P +> 

O a 

OJ 

o 



c 

u 

01 OJ 

H X! 



co in 


o m 
c~ m 


■* 00 
01 » 

t> iH 


r-l CM 
CM 01 

l-l » 






CM t- 

co 


O rH 



l> CO 

Tf m 

to tji 
co 

CM 



o o 
Tf m 
oi 01 



m t- cm 
in rH in 

CO r-l O 

i m m 

to 



^1 t* 

^* o 


o 

co 


in 


O CO 


CM Tfi 
CM CO 


» o 

^" o 


O O 
O O 


co ■* 
in •* 


m oo 

«* 00 


01 

rH 


CO 01 
CO CD 
H i^ 


iH 

co 
oo 


in 

iH 


o to 
o 00 
in 


i-l CD 
r-l CO 
00 CM 


r-i m 
in co 


O CM 
CM CO 

m » 


■> o 

iH 01 

01 o 


r-l CO 
CM N 

o m 




w o 
J; ° 

l> l-l 


00 


01 
CO 


i-i 


O CO 
rH 


Tf r-l 

r-i 


CM 


CO 


in r-i 

i-i 


01 

00 

00 


CM 

01 00 


o 

o 


01 


o o 
o to 


o ■* 

O CO 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


rH 

in 

•* 

00 
01 
01 

o 
» 

01 

iH 
O 
iH 


m ^i 

01 00 


CO 

m 

01 


m 
to 

i-i 


O CD 
O 00 

in 


OI CO 
■* CO 
iH CO 


oo m 

■* CO 
00 i> 


O CM 
CM CO 

in c~ 


i< in 

CM CM 

01 CO 


00 o 

m to 

O 01 


o t> 

iH o 
CO r-l 

O 
rH 


01 

oo 


oo 
m 


iH 


r-l to 
l-l 


Tt" iH 
rH 


CM 


Tji in 

CO 


in h 


o 

CO 


















O 
CO 



>> in 

00 rH 

m eg 



o •* 

o CO 


oo 
o o 


in ih 

CM tO 
t- rH 


^f o 
to o 
■* CM 



o o 


o o 


o 




o o 


o o 


o o 


O O 


o o 


o 


o o 


o o 


o 




o o 


o o 


o o 


o o 


o o 


o 


00 o 


CO 


o 


o 




v m 


•* in 


O CM 


oi in 


o o 


oo 


Tji o 


co in 


o 




(N N 


00 CO 


CM. CO 


rH CM 


O CD 


CO 


to 00 


CO 01 


m 




rf O 


co m 


in » 


to CO 


CM 01 


o 


01 If 


CO 


o 


r-l 




o to 


00 iH 


CM 


ih m 


ij« iH 


CO 


CO o 


■H 


■* 






iH 






CO 


iH 


00 


m ih 


to 






o 












CO 

rH 

C- 


l> 








to 












in 


01 








to 












^ 


[- 








oo 












in 


CD 




















iH 


o 




















•• 



a 
o 

to vi oi ai-Hoi ui c oi to to 


0) OJ OJ OJPOJ 0JOQJ0J0J 


^CJ O CJ OOOIOO-HCJCJCJ 


C-H01 H IJ1 ■HtO -H [/I OJ -H r/l ai -H to P H to H -H (0 


oj > tu p > aj > oj >ojQ,>ajr<>oju>aj>>ai 


S Ih 01 fl H C0 r<OliHtH[/lO)^iyi3iHt00Jr.01lHlMt0 


pfljcojojcojo-icoajccojctoajcaojcojojc 


t i^CO0)BWCUt0W0Ji%iCO0JlHCOCtlolCO0Jt0CO0JCOCO0J 


P-iol ftp ftc ftp ft ftOJ ftC ft D, 
| a ^ M ^a^^«§ , o1S^^ 1 H S 'o5« H ^ W c5^S 

^"S.S'S.A ° S OB "2 a wa -hc 

%.°b% 0U " 0U Otl-HOr. Or,COr.POtl 
W OJ to OJ Q to OJ OlOJiHtOOJritOOJ'PUlOJ'HtflOJCJOiaj 


o u n riiir-itHjaoiiVijap^ja^iHjaTatHjsojiVija 


°' H JPii <1) JI'iJ ,H J , - ,J BJI>-' J cja)PCij)4)-P'H0)P ftaip 

■HrHftO^ftO>ftOHftO(UftOHftOHftO0)ftO 


H 5 ;H Tl OlH a>3 c 
fflft (n cj < H S: IB ih 



139 



0) 

o 

a o t- 

H +> 01 

a H 
CO 



a> 




> 







0) 


c 




« 


a 

H 





, 


a 
CD 




ri 

3 



0> 


0) 





3 


c 


C 


a 


V 


H -P 


> 


a 


(1) 


O 


K 




XJ 




c 


01 


3 


u 


!* 


c 




a o 


■ 


H -p 


m 


a 


(i) 


oq 


BJ 


■o 




01 




•o 




c 




HI 




a 





in oi 
oo m 



t~ oo io 

TC CO f- 



o t- in m 

CD CO oo H 



oi w x 05 

rH 00 WO 
^ IN l> 



t- 00 
O) 

m 



00 CD 
Tji CO 



o in o ho co co 
■* f. H in to oo 

in eg co h oo 



CD CO 
Til t» 


in cm 

01 ■* 


in in 

Tf CO 


in h 

H ■•? 


co t> m 
in oo cm 


O CO 
Tl< CD 


cm in 

Tf X 


T)< 

X 


CO ■* 
O H 


H O 
O 01 

co in 


O CD 
IN rH 
00 iH 


C» o 

m cm 
m cd 


t-- oo ci 

O 01 X 
o ■* CO 


CM 01 
Ol CD 

rH m 


t~ CD 

CO Tf 

co in 


co 

CD 


CO 


01 CM 

•* X 
CM CO 


t- CM 


h m 

t~ rH 


01 CO t- 

wnoi 

rH 


t- rH 

CO 


X X 
T)l H 


CO 
CO 
CM 



o 

H 
rH £ 

a a 

■P H 

5^ 
e-i a 

> 



h 
01 

<H S 

to o 

s u 

a <h 



Ih 

a> 

<H 

01 o 

C5 -P 

a 



co o 

CM O 

X X 

CO 



O o 
CO o 
CO CO 



x m 

CM rH 
X t- 



CM O 

•* CO 
O X 



x •* o 

Tf t» O 
CM C- O 



•* CO 
CO CO 



H O 
T)< CO 
CD Tt< 



oi in 
■* X 

M CO 



CO CO o 
CO CO o 

H H 



H O 

C« o 
o m 



iH 01 

u a 
a o 

O -H 

u -P 
a a 
a 

< 



® r, 

com 
a u t- 

rH <H Ol 

a h 
ffl 



oio oo com ho 

HO COO in H oico 

moo coco in in cox 



c~ o o 

C- CD O 
H IN O 



f- O CO O 
CD CO X CO 

m co co ■* 



01 H O CM 
■tf CO t» CM 
CM CO 



a 

X 73 

« < 

OH 

* 8 

ft 

CJ 01 

<-< C I 
H 01 

m o 



> 01 > 

rl tfl rl 

A) S CD 

01 01 W 

ft 

H M H 

aw a 

c in c 

O rl >, Q 

to id a to 

U SI S U 

111 -p si oi 

O boa 





O 




cj a 


oi 


•rl 01 




•h oi a 


0) 


> 0> 




> oi e 


01 


rl tfl 




U tfl 0) 


c 


01 C 




01 c +■> 


0k 


CO 0) 




CO 01 c 


a 


Q. 




a-n 


rd 


a w 




h x a 
a w s 




c 


>. c 


rl 


o u 


rl 


O In 01 


0) 


tfl 01 


■P 


01 0) H 


J3 01 


ri .C 


01 


d x: u 


■P A! 


01 +> 

a o 


<1) 


01 -P -H 


O rl 


rl 



•H 0) 

> 01 ho 

h II C 

01 C H 01 

X ffl 4-> CO 

Q.XI hC 
H M hO G H 

Ci H -rl -rl d 

a -J u c 

ri 0) o 

01 0) -P 01 tfl 

rl J3 01 C h 

0) P 01 -H 11 

AOh boa 

■P c 

X Cd 



> 



u oi a cd 



fH rl 

01 01 
Si ■!-> 
+-> 01 
O E I 
01 



O rl 

tfl 01 

rl Si 



O TC 

H 

01 H 



CM ■* 

Tl< O 


Ol CO 
TC X 


X 


tji m 
CM o 
h m 


01 X 
CM O 
X CD 


CD 
O 


o H 
■r)i x 


C~ H 
CO 

CM 


H 
01 
CO 



m ■* 
cm x 
o co 



co o 

m 

01 01 



o o o o 

o o o o 

Ht(<' -* o 

x co mm 

CD (£) T)l oi 



x h t- h 

co x c^ 



Q 
o 

H rt 

< 01 

HH 01 

!S X 

< 

X 



(A 

01 

o. 

■rl CO 

> 01 

rl tfl 

V C 

X 0) 

a 



to 

01 

u 

•H 01 
> 

CJ 01 

0) c 
X 01 

a oi 

a 5 oi a w 
c a c 

rl S O rl 

tfl 01 01 o> 

u si-a u si 

01 •!-> -rl 0) HP 

a O h ft o 
o 

X 



140 



c t» 

(J ot- 
i-l +J o> 

m 



o> > 

CJ 0) 

a o K 

c« -P 



« a> 


CM H 


O 3 


CO <J> 


con 


• • 


rt -P 0) 


CD lO 


rH > 


|H CO 


a O 




ffl a: 




■o 




v c 




O 3 




C h 




a o 




h -p tn 




ra a> 




ffl OS 






00 CM 


■o 


co in 


a> 


• • 


•a 


0) t- 


a 


CO r-1 


<D 


m r-i 


ft 


* ■» 


3 


■* m 


CO CM 



ot X) 
■P US 
O i-l 

H -rl 



Pi 

<h e 

CO O 

C Sh 



Pi 
II) 

<H 

to o 
c +> 



I 

•H 

Pi in 
ft C 

o o 

Pi -H 

ft-p 

ft rt 

< 



a> 
o 

cam 

« ot- 

rH U 0> 

(CHrt 



m m 

CM Tji 

m i-i 



■* oo 
cm o 
o o 



to 


to 


01 


0) 


o 


c u 


■H 


01 O -H 


,a > 


0) -rl > 


■P Pi 


t»+l p 


i-H 4) 


com 


01 OT 


0) 0) OT 


X 0> 
H X iH 


ft Q. 


w c (u 


< <h a 


>-i c 


woo 


Pi O 


X (A 


HJH 1) 


•O Pi 


A CD Pi 


Ul.ll 

H«ft 


•P d> 


O-Hft 


J O 


C 


ffl ffl 


< 


a 




ft 





H O) 
(O O 

oo e- 



tn m 

CD CO 

cm m 



in m 
co * 



OHO 

r-i m o 
t- o o 







to 










0> 








to 


CJ 








0) 


■H 


to 




OT 


o 


> 


01 




W 


•H 


Pi 


U) 




O 


> 


01 









Pi OT 


0) 


ii 


> 


01 




a 


o 


3 


OT iH 


« 


a 


OT 


to 


c 




•p 




c 





p< 


to 


OT 


a 


tfl 


0) 


■H 


Z 


u, 


Pi -C 


(0 


< 


1) 


01 


p 


CO 


OS +-> ft o < 


w 


CD 








t-l > 









in o 

CM iH 
■* O) 



t» rH i-H 
t» CO H 

co ■* en 



cm co in 

a co o 

CJl iH -J< 

O CD CM 

O C- i-H 



5 CO O 

o 00 o 

s ■* t- 

O o o 

<> o in 

c*- 00 00 

■p en in 



o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 


O CD t- 
O CO o 

o t- m 


CO 
CM 






t- * 00 
cm •* m 

iH 00 iH 


o 

co 

rH 





■H 


10 


p 




> 


11 


ri 




Pi 


CO 


CJ 




CD 


a 


o 




OT 


u 
a 


> 




rH 


w 


iH 




C 




C 


OT 





Pi 





J 


to 


u 


■H 


8 


Pi 


d 


bD 


& 


■p 


0) 


X 


O OS 


CJ 








OT 









en 


en 


CM 


CM 


o 


o 


CM 


CM 


in 


in 






•q< 


■* 


00 CO 


co 


O rH 


CM 


t- 00 


in 


i* 00 


CO 


in co 


en 






CO CM 


o 




rH 


CM CO 


in 


0> CO 


CM 


in o> 


in 


rH CO 


in 


CM CM 


■* 






Tf CO 


CM 


01 rH 


rH 


CM rH 


-* 


o o 


o 


O CO 


co 


CO t» 


o 


CD Tf 


rH 


C» r-l 


en 






cm in 


t~ 


O CM 


CM 


CO rH 


I 1 


O 


o 


O 


o 


CM 


CM 


CO 


00 


O 


o 






t» 


t» 


rH 


rH 


co 


CO 


t- 


r~ 


in 


in 


m 


in 


rH 


rH 


O O 


o 


o o 


o 


rH rH 


CM 


CO 00 


CO 


co m 


CM 






■* CO 


co 


CO CM 


o 


CM rH 


■* 


o ■* 


f 


o o 


o 


O H 


rH 


O rH 


rH 


o •* 


■* 






rH rH 


CM 


to 




01 




o 




•H U) 




> 0) 




Pi tfl 




■oi a 




OT 0) 




a 




■3B 




a 




>i O P 




OS to 01 




< p. x: 




OS 0) P 

ffl ft o 




M 




-J 





co m 

CO CM 

CO o 



t-i to 

rn D 

Z O 

3 -H (fl 

t=l Pi to 

O c« a 

O OT 01 

•>s a, 

ZH« 

o « w 

pi c 

E-i O Pi 

< 10 0) 

w p, x: 

w * a 

O ft o 

w 

OS 





00 


00 




in 


in 




CM 


CM 




CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 










t» 


t~ 




co in 


rH 




cm en 


CM 




O CO 


en 




t» in 


CM 




f- o 


CO 










00 i-l 


en 




CM 


CM 




in in 


o 




rH o 


CM 




rH rH 


CM 




CO ■* 


O 




CM •* 


t~ 










rH en 


O 




0) rH 


rH 




rH CO 


in 




rH 00 


0) 




■* in 


O) 




rH CM 


CO 




CO CO 


CO 




O 00 


co 










o t- 


t- 




CM CM 


•* 




CM CO 


in 




O O 


o 




o o 


o 




CM CM 


■* 




in in 


o 




CO 01 


CD 










CM CO 


0) 




rH 


rH 




i-HCO 


r- 




■*-* 


00 




rHOl 


o 




rH CM 


•* 




rHrH 


CM 




O O 


o 




o o 


o 




00 o 


00 




CO o 


CO 




CM CO 


CO 










C- CO 


CO 




o o 


rH 




CM CO 


in 




CM 


CM 




rH 


rH 




rH 


rH 




in 


in 




rH 


rH 










■<*■ 


t 




rH 


rH 


OT 






W 






OT 












OS 






ft 


tfl 




OS 


01 




In 


CJ 
■H tfl 




SB 


> 0> 




w 


Pi CO 
01 C 




W 


OT 01 




u 


a 




> 


rt w 




OS 


a 




w 


o u 




OT 


to 01 
Pi Pi x; 




u 


0) fl) P 

P ft O 




t-i 




►J 


a 




CO 


* 




3 






a 







141 



<1> 


O 

m 


00 


u 

CON 
ol -P t- 


DO 
CO 


eg 

r-4 



« 


• 













> 










c 


01 










rt O K 










rH -P 












n 


• 










a 


h 

9 
CO 






O 
O) 




0) 


0) 


• 




• 




o 


3 


t> 




<0 




c 


a 


r- 




r~ 




rt 


a 


M 




(N 




iH P 


> 













CO 


O 








pa 


a 

c 


H 








0) 



s, 










a 












a o 


• 










i-l P 


0) 










at 


CO 










00 


OS 














00 


T)< 


w 


o 






en 


00 


o 


o 


•o 




• 


• 


• 


• 


4) 




Oi 


(N 


in 


o 


■a 




co 


i-( 


t> 


o 



(B O 

Tl" O 

00 rH 

N CO 

CO •* 



CD 13 
P 01 
O iH 

01 

> 



u 

a> 

■ e 

oi o 

c u 

01 >H 



<H 



(4 
(I) 

■H 

01 o 

C -P 

01 



I 

•H 

k 0) 

a c 
o o 

h -H 

ft-p 

< 



a 

o e 
com 

« dt- 
iH <H 0> 
01 r-l 

a 









•H 












t. 








■P 





















A 










01 


a 








fci 










a 


o 








.O 
11 











•H 


& 








iH 










0) 










V 










a 


=3 








o 






01 
0} 




« 


01 






n 









o 






c 






-p 


•H 






•H 01 




>> 









•H 


> 






> 0) 




h 


01 






■H 


•H 


01 




t-i 01 




O 


fc 






« 


CJ 


Sh 




01 c 




p 


« 






a 




o" 




CO CO 




3 






& 


=3 


•a 




& 




.Q 










S3 


■PH ;: 


01 


•H 





a 


ID 




O 




a 


ol W 


c 


h 


■p 


w 


U 


« 


■H 


01 


CO 


c 


o 


p 




l-H 


C 


01 


P 


c 


B 


u 


•H 


c 


0) 


ft. 


e) 


>. 





at 


a> 


01 CO 


01 


o 


a) 


CO 


fn 


o 


■H 


«4 


h 


u a 


c 


o 


cm 


to 


9 


1-1 


h 


01 


■H 


m p 
ft O 


s 


1 


01 


3 


tn 


a 


■P 


p 


P 


a 


a 


a 


1 


01 


0) 


0) 









01 


u 


M 


0. 


> 


cc 






z 


a 



C 




a 


>. 


H 


01 


ft 


iH 




+J 


a 




s 


•H 




•P 


•p 


Oj 


c 


01 


V 


c 


B 


11 


ft 


a 


•H 


a 


3 





C 


o 


W 



142 



O 

C O 

« ON 

rH -P 01 

a r-i 
m 



4) 




O 


a> 


C 


3 


CJ 


o a 


rH 


+-> <u 


rt 


> 


CO 


a> 




OS 




73 


a> 


a 


o 


3 


c 


1* 


at 


■P 


rH 


m 


nt 


(I) 


co 


« 


TJ 




O 




•o 




c 




(1) 




a 





1) 

I-l 

rH * 

at rt 

P rH 
O -H 

H at 



ri 
0) 

<h e 
w o 

C ri 

at "h 



a) 

<H 

01 o 
C 4-> 
at 



o o o 
moo 


O O O O 00 

o o o o en 


co 


cm in in 
in o m 

CO CO CO 


lonoon 
t~ co oo m cm 
co m cm Tt< o 


01 


CM m CM 
t- m rH 

CM rH rH 


CO o t> o CM 
CM rH CM 


o 

CD 


O 

o 




O 

o 



I 

•rl 0) 

U C 

a o 

o -H 
(H •-> 
D, at 

a, 

< 



O 

e g m 

H hOl 
B) <H rH 
CO 



cMt-m mmocM© 
in co ai t^ co oo cd o 
tc cd in co in cm co o 



a 
9> 

a oi 

O Q 01 

tl^ 1 - 5 9 

> 01 J 

« II) rH 
H rl O rl 
D] 11 O II 
+-> JTJ H-» 

H G o at 

CO rH CO S: 
W 

a 



0) J 



01 


s 


C 







a 


J 


G 


rt 




■H 






nt 




5 


bo nt 


• 


s 


H 


a) 


■o 


CO 


rf r. 


hf 




H 




u 


nt 




« 


•p 


m 


o < 


tn 


t* 


c 


<D 




•rl 




O 


<D 


•H 


<1) 




rH XI 


a 


* 


nt 


S-i 


a x> 


a 


H 


a; 
co 


s 


CO 


3 


£ 


at <D 

rH H 



o o o 
o o o 


o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o o o 
o o o 
o o o 


o o o 
o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 


o m o 
cd co in 

00 CO H 


o o o 

CO CD rr 


m 
in 

rH 


o 

00 
CD 

rH 


o o o 
o o o 


o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o o o 
o o o 
o o o 


o o o 
o o o 
o o o 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 










o in o 
co co in 

CO CO iH 


o o o 

CO ID ■* 


m 
m 

rH 


o 

00 
CD 



o o o o o o o 

o o o o o o o 

o o o o o o o 

o m o o o o m 

cd oo in co co ^< m 

00 CO tH tH 



in 








SI 




nt 




C 


a 








c 




3 


>, a 


o 


01 






nt 


SI 


P 


3 


•H 


c 


in 


m 


3 


c 




<l> 


P 


nt 


c 


c 


nt 




<H 




U 


S 


0) 


nt 




a 


M at 




6 
0) 


5 3 


oi j -a co 

bO rH 


a 

o 


•O H 






H 


p » 


o < 


o> 


O 


r< 


r< 


a 


0) 




•H 




ctf 


o 


<1> 


0) 


■rl 


(11 




rH T 




J2 


P 


a 


nt 


rl 


a jo 


c 


T3 


o 


nt 


(11 


U 


4-> 


3 


g 


R 


e co * co a co a 


►J 


03 





















V 




01 




c 


01 


oj 


a 


o. 


at 

3 


<S 




a 


>> 


3 


tH 


01 


Rt 


01 



143 



4) 
U 

<* o t» 



o 


Tf 


o 


o 










o 


t» 


o 


o 


o 


0) 


00 


to 


• 


• 


■ 


• 


o 


CO 


in 


to 


01 


© 


IO 


■«)< 


• 


• 


• 


• 


CO 


O 


•* 


iH 


w 


o 


CO 


CI 


en 


T* 


00 




CO 


CO 


CO 


to 










co 


in 


CO 


on 


r4 


t» 


H 














iH 






r-l 

in 

CO 


•* 


t^ 


-1- 



CD 


• 


o 


> 


c 


« 


at 


O OS 


r-l 


p 


a 


h 


ca 


5 


a; 





o 


3 


a 


a 


a 


V 


iH 


P > 


rt 


4) 


ffi 


os 




•d 


0) 


a 


a 


& 


rt 





iH 


P 0) 


« 


a> 


03 


K 


V 




V 




T3 




C 









a 





■* 


H 


O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


r-( 


o 


m 


CO 


05 


CO 


OO CO 


O 


H 


in 


co 


CO 


tn 


t» 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


T-\ 


•* CO 


iH 


CO 


iH 


■* 


■* 




in 


CO 


en 




oo 


CO 


m co 



to 


CO 


en 


CO 


iH 


o 


00 


<0 


00 


CO 


CI 


05 




•* 


OS 


CO 


CO 





to 


CO 


» 


to 


r^ 


o 


■* 


rH 


in 


00 


CO 


0> 


en m 


o 


m 


■* 


<B 


to 


in 


o 


to 


m 


r-t 


o 


O) 


i> •* 


o 


CO 


■* 


■* 


o 


CO 


oo 


(0 


•* 


00 


l> 


in 


■* CO 



•* i> 

00 

eg 



iH 


a 


rt 


m 


p 


rH 


O 


•H 


H 


rt 




> 




< 


U 




0) 




<H 


6 


Ifl 





c 


u 


rt «h 



f 01 


m 


Ol 


o 


CO 


in 


00 


o 


rH 


01 


o 


o o 


H 00 


•>s< 


I 1 


o 


■* 


in 


00 


00 


in 


Ol 


o 


o o 


H CO 


00 


in 


in 


CO 


to 


to 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 00 


H O) 


CO 


CO 


rH 


o 


t> 




H 


•* 


to 


00 


CO t- 


H r-l 


01 


00 


in 


CO 


CO 


CO 


01 


00 


oo 


t~ 


o to 



00 o 

1-H » 

m oi 



r^ 


eg 


on 


T* 


CO 


00 


in 


eg 


w 



CO 
c o 

« p 



l 

•H CO 

u a 

B. O 
O -H 

U P 

a <4 
a 

< 



o 


•<* 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 




o 


to 


O 


o 






(0 


rH 


m 


rH 


o 


o 


■* 


o 




o 


CO 


o 


o 






in 


Ol 


00 


to 


eg 


to 


o 


r-l 




eg 


rH 


■* 


o 






o 


O 


o 


o 


eg 


Ol 


t» 


eg 




00 


to 


o 


o 






00 


CO 


t» 


■* 


CO 


t» 


to 


■* 




o 


to 


to 


o 






01 


oo 


eg 


1-1 
o 

iH 


in 


eg 


o 

rH 


r-l 




i> 

r-l 


•* 


01 

H 


Ol 






CO 
01 
CO 


■* 


in 


in 


01 






in 


■* 


to 


m 


t» 


o 


o 




© 


o 


CO 


00 


■* 






m 


CM 


l> 


rH 


CO 


o 


o 




CO 


in 


01 


01 


00 






■* 


eg 


m 


o 


o 


© 


o 




to 


CO 


r-t 


CO 


eg 






01 


o 


m 


rH 


rf 


o 


to 




t- 




l-l 




in 
eg 

i-H 






H 


CN 

i-T 


rH 


CM 


eg 


m 


eg 

CO 

to 




00 

o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


© 


O 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(0 


t~ 


eg 


CO 


in 


01 


CM 


rH 


CO 


CO 


01 


00 


CO 


on 


o 


to 


to 


in 


CO 


00 


rH 


CO 


to 


01 


to 


to 


to 


m 


to 


© 


eg 


t> 


to 


o 


CD 


t~ 


to 


l> 


CM 


eg 


01 


00 


CO 


t> 


o 


r~ 


o 


rH 


CO 


•* 


01 


01 


r-> 


o 


oo 


H 


CO 


Tl< 


Tjl 


eg 


to 


oo 


t» 


oo 


l> 


01 


l> 


to 


CO 


o 


to 


rH 


t- 


eg 




■* 




•* 


CO 


iH 


CO 






l-l 


Tf 


rH 


m 


co 


eg 







0) 

tt o m 
h u t> 

« <H 01 





o 


r* 


O 








•* 


*• 




CO 






O 




o 


m 


© 








to 


o 




rH 






o 




•* 


•* 


o 








rH 


rH 




rH 






oo 




rH 


m 


o 








CO 


rH 




in 






t~ 




* 


H 


CO 








C» 


•* 




H 






to 
































(P 


eg 


m 


►H 

< 
m 

HH 

Q 






CO 

00 
rH 


CO 


CO 

HH 

8 

03 
O 

CO 


rH 

CO 

w 

CO 

M 

s 

OS 






0) 


f- 








is 

CO 

< 










H 

IH 


(4 








S5 










CO 

w 
o 






a 


s 








<s 


CO 






* 




IH 






w 








i 




H 


§3 


o» 


B 


> 

OS 






o 
o 


o 

M 




w 






u 


(4 




-! 


w 






V 


> 


Q 


r ) 




o 


§ 


1* 


OS 


SB 


< 


CO 






SB 


OS 


W 


HH 




o 


< 


o 


o 


w 






CO 


o 


w 


IH 


> 






o 


W 


s 


M 


X 


CO 




w 


M 


CO 


fa 


IT 




-i 


< 






H 




SB 


a 


hH 


H 




CO 


w 




<J 




u 


o 


< 


CJ 


< 


OS 


< 


CJ 


CO 


r/i 




6 


rt, 


M 
r3 




In 


IH 

-J 


s 


8 


< 
OS 


OS 


M 


a 


H 




z 


< 


03 


CQ 


5 

CO 


OQ 


H 


EC 


CO 


O 


a 


CJ 


CQ 




N 
O 


H 
CO 


D 
0. 


i 


B 


ts 


u 

CO 


IH 


w 

OS 


B 




W 
Q 





144 





CM (0 


O 


CM 


o 


en 


ooo>o 


CO 


O 


■* 




00 o 


CO 


t» 


01 


CM 


Hinaio 


CO 


o 


■* 


ID 



CO <o 


CO 


t~ 


m 


O 


m 01 r-l 00 


•* 


CO 


rH 


c t» 


CO l> 


CO 


CO 


iH 


<* 


•* m t> co 


o 


o 


in 


oi Ot- 


CM 


m 


•* 


CO 


(«• 


CO CM tD iH 


CM 


en 


CO 


ri-PCfl 




















ffl H 


0) 






o 


01 


cm *»< m 


CM 


CO 


■* 


n 








rH 


rH 


CM CM 


i> 




to 








> 


o 




(1) 


c 




OS 


a 







rH 


+-> 


St 


CO 




3 


CQ 




CO. 


(I) 




0) 







3 


c 




13 


rt 


o 





iH 


p 


> 


as 




a> 


CQ 




OS 
13 


<1> 




c 




c 




£ 


a 







rH P 


m 


«t 




a 


D3 




OS 


■0 













•a 






a 






ai 






D, 







0) 

rH 
Si 
iH nj 
at rH 
-P -H 
O CU 
H > 



St 



•H S 

to o 

C !h 
a <h 



in © © en 

to o o o 

CO O O H 

in oi © o m 

HOO 01 



to 


CO rH rH 


rH 

to 
m 


m 

rH 




in 

iH 


C- 




l> 



o 






o 


o 


■* rH CO rH 


01 




tO 05 


m 


o 






o 


o 


tO O rH O 


t- 




m rH 


i> 


o 






o 


to 


m to to oo 


rH 




O O 


o 


o 






o 


CO 


t> co m cm 


CO 




r- oi 


to 


in 






m 


rH 


iH rH tO O 


rH 




r> 05 


t» 










CO 


m co •* 
o •* 

rH rH 


rH 

to 

CM 




(H rH 

m t> 

00 
rH 


CO 
CM 
01 

iH 


eg to 


O M 


IN 


CN 


05 O 


fHPlOO 


t» 


o m o --;• o o 


01 


00 o 


CO "* 


f~ 


CO 


CM O 


tO rH tO O O 


to 


o 


HO« O O 


01 


CO to 


CO IN 


t» 


CO 


o to 


in rH m o oo 


to 


to 


l> CM CO O O 


00 


CO t» 


CO 05 


to 


o 


■* CO 


IN 00 rH O 00 


CO 


o 


rH CM 00 O O 


CM 


l> 


m co 


•* 


<N 


t> rH 


rH rt" 05 l> rH 


CO 


05 rH tO rH O O 


oo 






















m 






rH 


05 CO 


t» oo co m 


CO 


00 


to co cm m 


in 








rH 


rH 
CO 

to 

CO 
O 


CM to 

rH rH 

CO 

^< 
CO 


CO 

CO 

o 

o 

00 
00 




rH CO H rH 
rH CO 

CM 


00 
CM 



o o 
o o 


o 
o 


O 00 
O X 
t> rH 


oo 
oo 
oo 






co m 
to 


CO 

l> 



U in 

a c 
o o 

U -H 
Q.P 
Q.CTJ 



O O 

o o 
o o 











CM to 


O CM CM 


CM 




01 CO 




rf rH 




t- 


o m o ■* 




05 


ID 

o 

c 








00 O 


CO ^" t» 


CO 




CM 


to 




tO rH 




to 


OHO» 




05 


em 






CO to 


00 CM C- 


CO 




O 01 




in rH 




to 


tO l>CM CO 




CO 


eg 


O t» 






CO l> 


CO 01 to 


o 




■* CO 




l> « 




CO 


O rH CM CO 




CM 


rH 


St 01 






l> 


in co ■* 


CM 




l> CO 




rH n< 




CM 


05 rH tO rH 




00 


«<H rH 
































n 








01 




rH 




oi m 




o 




CO 


CO to CO 




CO 














rH 




rH 






CM 




in 


rH rH 




co 












01 

■a 












rH 




rH 


rH 




rH 
























. 






, 














c a 












in 


■p 






•o 














P <D 






Sh 






a 


01 






OS 














o 0) 






■H 






•H 


•H 




















U J3 






O 







«5 


a oi 




U 


bfl+> 














bfl (0 






> 




hD 


S 


a 




St 


S3 CO 












rH 


Sx & 






u 




a 




U -H 




01 <D S 


•H 












O Si 


cn at 






0) 




U 


h 


21 




CO S 


St OS 












O bo 


rH 43 






in 







111 




S3 CO 


a S3 












43 -H 


a, to 









to 


+-> 


+> in 


a) 




'H CO 


CO -H 












rioS 








OS 


c 


co 


a a 


& o3 




a) St 


"O 












O CO 


c dS 








■H 




i*-H 






St 01 


■o St 












o 


a> 






-P 


C8 


ho 


a! 


0} St 




Q 13 rH > 


rt 

PS S3 












J3 -P U 


CO >■ 






MH 


S 


13 


nH S 


S3 -H 




■H at O 












UH1 


S3 -P 






o 




■H 


rH 


as O 




iH as > -a 














CO o 


(0 u 






<H 


^ +" 


a! !i 


^ > 




rH St TJ S3 


1 | 












u -P 


S ID 






o 


0) 


C 


+j © 


P« (t 




•H Q St < 














si o a 


at J3 






c 


+-> 


■H 


01 -P 







<H a) 


St Sh 












00 A en 


J3 O 






ca 


CS 


& 


13 a) 


1 01 




•0 T3 rH 4-> 















■h aw 


co a 






CQ & 


HS 







S3 CO rH 01 


e s 












x ca 


to 














m os 




as O at 











in 




CO 


MO CO C 






l> CO '■> 


^ON 




-isms 


CO CO 








ID 




Tjl (» tO 


13 t» » O 






to 


l> 


t^ 


IN IN 01 CO 














iH 




to to 01 


•H Ol Ol H 






01 01 Ol 


Ol Ol rH t- 




iH iH ■* CO 


in in 








o 




01 01 rH rH rH rH -P 






rH 


rH 


rH 


rH rH 


Ol 




(— t~ e — c— 


t- i> 








■H 




iH rH 


a> at 














•.rH 




01 01 01 05 


05 05 








■p 






■a - - > 














< 




iH rH rH rH 


rH rH 








u 




- -in 


Ot-mo 






COCO^ASCMCOO - 














< 


0] 00 rH rH 


SHH B 






rH 


<M 


CM 


C rH rH 


rH CO 
















iH 




ID CU 












at 






Tt< to in c~ 


rH CM 








rH 


O 


P -P -P 


OS P P OS 




St 


■P 


-P 


+> 


H P +-> 


■P -P 




N^^H 


CM CM 








oi 


o 


u u u 


u u 




ID 


fH 


rM 


u 


^^ 


^^ 














•H J3 < < < 


< < 




-P < < < 




U -P -P P V 


■P P 








o 


o 








a 














St u u u 


u u 








ID 

a 

CO 


co 








* 














S < <c <; < 


CO 


<C <! 



































145 



c O 

OS O t> 



■* -O 1 O O ID O 
t> CD O O CM O 


to 


o o o 
o o o 


o 

o 


01 


rH 
00 


o 

CO 


o 
en 


O CM CM 

O ■* -G 




co oo o o oo m 

HOOOION 


in 
to 

o 


cm m o 
w •* o 
m oo oo 


05 

rH 


00 

m 
N 


CO 

00 


<0 

en 

o 




O tO CO 
O (O CO 

o in r> 


o 
o 

U5 






















CM 00 CM CM CM f- 

CM CD CD rH 


m 
t> 


rH •* 04 
CM 


0) 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


to 

CM 




m cm 


c- 



c « 
a o 
h -p in 



(1) 












3 


c 




C 


OS 


o 





r-4 


-p 


> 


o! 




a> 


ou 






o 




C 


o 

c 




£ 


Oi 







rH 


■p 


m 


« 




aj 


CO 




OS 


•o 













T) 






c 






(I) 






a 







-H 

H trj 

> 



ID rH 
CM tO 


0) 


co 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


in Oi 05 

CM tO rH 


co 

rH 


CO 05 
00 00 


CM 
CO 
Ol 


CO 

to 
to 


oo m 


co 
in 

00 


CO 00 CM 

ootf to 

rH in rH 


oo 
















m oo 

CM 


to 
co 

rH 


rH 

r> 

rH 


CO Tf 


t~ 


m to 

Tf rH 


rH 

to 


o m o o to o 
O CM o o o o 


rH 
CO 

m 
m 
t> 


83 

,ooo!oo 

,250.00 
,800.00 


CO 
00 

o 
in 
o 


,258.49 

568.99 

,548.69 

,000.00 


r> 

rH 


o co o o t> m 
m m o o cm <n 
o co o o oo m 


to 

CO 



co m 

rH t> 
CM Tf 



m o5 cm 

CM 



m o 



tO O O 05 05 

t> oo o t» o 

tf to O CO CM 

Tl< 05 in CM rH 
00 



01 E 

c o 

a u 



o to f> 
in co to 

r> 05 rH 



t- o 
t> o 


m 

05 


05 O 
CM O 
rH O 


to 
rH 
oo 






cm m 

05 •* 


CO 

m 



01 

c o 

af -P 



u w 

Q, B 

o o 

Sh-H 

a-p 

a cs 
< 



o o 
in o 

CM 00 



O E 
com 
a! u r> 

rH <H 05 
C3 rH 

03 



cMinrHmootoo 

CMC500CMOOOO 





otot>cooot>m 


«* 


■* 


O 




o 


oo co oo 


to 




t-too 


O O) 05 


CO 




incOrHinOOCMCM 


t~ 


co 


O 




o 


in to ts< 


t> 




00 l> rH 


O t> O 


CD 




ooicMcooooom 


oq 


ao 


o 




o 


CM 


m in 


co 




to ■* 00 


O CO CM 


m 
































t>00C0t~CMCMO5C- 


CO 


CD 


m 




m 


CM 


m 


00 




tO ■* rH 


O CM rH 


CD 




CO rH in CD tO CO rH 


rH 


rH 


CM 




CM 




■* 


•<)< 




rH oo m 


LO 




rH 




M" 










0) 
Ul 






rH 




CM 




■a 


























>> PS 






Sh 








05 3 








•o 






c3 .BEE E rH 






ID 








to 









B 






S -POOOCOrH 






■P 








3 J3 






■P 01 


oi a 






XS [OWHtIHHHH 






B 








01 X! 






■H +J 


>>-p -i 






ho-p Pff as -p £ 






a> 








c si -P 






ra 3 


Sh Q 
as i-H 






•H>SnOOOrHOSH 






u 









X! OS 










XS,|J 3 p 3A3U 






m 






X 


•H 4-> CQ 






rH 


Sh rH 






C. > Sh Sh U U > 






>.-p 


• ro 




■rt 


H-> OS 






o a 


XI tS >. 






• E -H -P -P -P X! -P a! 






■P A 


a o 




Q 


OS CQ -a 






O O 01 


■H O 






OwoSaiOlUlbOOlSC 






bfl-H -H 






> a 






x; H « 


JHD 






c c a a -h n 






<H -H 


3 ^3 




•a 


OTJ O 






o +J 








3 ' 10 O O OX O It 






as J 


o- as 




s 


SCO, 






CO • -H 


• • . 






>-5 -P -P O O <_> u^ 






00 


W OS 




s 


p 

OS ft to 






crto 


rj* o* C 






CO C o3 rH 

















Sh O 


OUU 




-P 


rH 0) O O O O OS 






O -H 


<D (1) 






a 






O < rH 


< < < 




- 


HhEO5O5O50IO5» 






■H SH 


o o 




01 


a) m E 






■H 






c 


o o 0) mm 






rH <H 


•H -H 




a m a e> 

E T3 E ft 






•o OTjTfa 




o 


s > ui a a a o axs 






XI OS rH rH 








•a c x: 


B E E 




CJ 


O-HalaSaJaJSHaJ-H 






S^fiS 




HJB. 1 




s 


B as u as as as 

n J co J J J 






ouu o 


















O J 






w 


t~ o o •* ^i 






05 tji m m 




i~i 


co ■* m 




•H 


00 O CM CO •* 




<D 


tOt»t>rHCMC0r>'J , t> 






>.to r> r> t> 




t» 


r> t~ t> 




+j to to c- r> r> r> 




rH 


050505r>r>r>05c»05 


■ 




-P 05 05 05 OJ 




05 05 05 05 




•H 


tO 05 Ol 05 05 05 




O 


rHrHrH050505rHO5rH 


■P 




0) rH rH rH rH 




t-i 


rH rH rH 




ID 


05 i-H rH 


rH rH rH 




-H 


rH rH rH rH 


CO 




■H 






a 








i-H 







rH S P -P +> 

al X! U Sh Sh 

■H M< < < 

O -H 

S 

a 
oo 



+-> P -P H-> -P H-> 

Sh SH Sh ^ Sh ^ 



•tH -P -P -P -P 
rH Sh Sh Sh Sh 
Xl< ■* < < 



■HHU1H CO 
hJ CD CO CO CO 

as 

+J -P -P -P 

SH Sh Sh Sh Sh 
O < < < < 

OS 



cr •-< m p- < oo 

O rH •& rH CO CM ■* 

H-> -P +J P -P -P 

■O Sh Sh Sh « Sh Sh 

E < < < < < < 



146 





CUD O O O O 


o in 


rH 


CO 05 © 00 


o 


CD 0) 


o t~ 


C- r-i 


CM tD 




O 00 o o o o 


O CM 


i-l 


m o> t- 05 


CM 


en m 


o t» 


CO CM 


00 o 





o c- o c- o o 


O rH 


CD 


CM rH CO 00 


c» 


CM o 


o as 


en to 


t» m 


o 05 o ■* m m 


m 05 


00 


OriHM 


in 


to m 


o en 


CM H 


C- 00 


c t> 


OOlDB^lO 


C- 00 


m 


^OHH 


to 


CO 


o to 


m co 


to <* 


a ot- 


m 05 t- t~ co cm 


CO 00 


Tf 


nxNO 


co 


CO 


in 


O Tt" 


CM t> 


CO iH 


00 iH 


iH iH 


CD 


HlO(- 


Tf 
















> 







CD 


c 




PS 


CO 







iH 


p 


Sh 


co 




3 


PQ 




CO 


(1) 




CD 


O 




3 


□ 




C 


cO 


o 


CI) 


iH 


-p 


> 


ed 




CD 


pq 




PS 







E 


o 

c 


o 


s 


CO -p 




rH 




m 


rt 




(!) 


pa 




PS 



T3 

CD 

■a 

c 

<D 

a 
w 



O C- CO o 


O 

in 


c- to t~ to 
c- m oo 

CM 00 00 


CM 

O 






o o t~ 

CM CM ^ 


05 

00 



tO OH 

to O CO 



c-© 00 
cno r- 



O t" CD O ■* CM in CMo 05 

c» o>'* o m o co ooo o 
tj< cMt> c» co •* m com ■* 



at A 
■p ctt 
O i-l 
Eh -H 

a 
> 

< 



OrHoooo o w 
omoooo ocm 



o to o o o o 


O r4 


© o o m in in 


in oi 


o o in co c* in 


t- oo 



in ■* c- r- co cm tooo 

00 ■* H H iH 



to 


OOMOM 
00 CO ■* O 0) 


o 
m 


t> 

05 
CM 


>* 05 05 O 00 

Ht>CDON 

CD 00 O i-l 


CM 

05 

co 








01 
05 


CO 00 O O 
CM CO O C» 


CM 

co 



otomco^i-Hor-ocMin t- o oto 

OCnCMOCMCOOr-Oi-HCM 05OCDO 

HNHNncDO0)*MH NO Mil 

tocMintDTfocnincom ooooooo 

comiHcot»ococoo5M tom © ^< 

coniHih in cm oto m mt- 



CD 

<h e 

[0 o 

c u 

Ctt <H 



to o 

a +> 



i 

■ri 

u w 
a, c 
o o 

u -H 
Q.-P 

a, a 
< 





CJ 

c E m 

« ot- 

i-l U 05 

U^HH 

CO. 





O i-l 


o 


OOO 


O 


m 


CD 


o 


O CM 






CN 




otomn^Ho 


t~ o cm in 




t~ 


o 


O CD 




o m 


o 


OOO 


O 


CM 


t- 


00 CO ^ 






in 




ooiNonn 


O 


t> O rH CM 




Cti 


o 


to O 




O iH 


o 


ooo 


O 


rH 


CM 


•<« 05 05 






co 




HNHNCOCDOOlfOOrl 




CM 


o 


t~ m 




o 05 o in m in 


m 05 


X 


rH 


t> CD 






CO 




CD 


cm in 


CD 


^< 


o oi m o m 




00 


o 


00 00 




o co m oo t- m 


c- 


00 


05 




to oo 






in 




CO 


in rH 


CO 


t^ 


o 


co co o oo 




CD 


m 


o ■* 




m o 


t- 


fCON 


CO 


X 


in 




CO 


oo 






IN 




co 


CM H 


r-< 




m 


CM Tf to 




m 




in t- 




oo co 




rH 


H 


iH 


00 




CM CO 






CD 














in 








rH 














l-l 


























bo 














CO 


•o 
































(3 












a 


1-1 


■a c 






























to 


-H 












o 


iH 


c a 
























• 


r-l 




c 


C -P 












•H 


3 


co -i 
























+-> 


rH 




co 


O 












-P 


N 


►J 












to 










ho to 


c 


CD 




r-i 


■H >> 












<a 


SI 


CD CD 








to 




c 










c c 


•H 


s 




a, 


10 rH S 












> -a 


CO 


rH >>rH 








a 




■H 










■H O 


CO ho O rH 




tO U r-i 






•p 






u a 


Sh 


>> Ctt >> 








•H 




cO 










a -h 


S C J 


o 


c 


■ri C r-i 






c 






CD 3 


■p 


o^ O 

o fi o 


X! 






CO 




!h 










h +J 


•H 




u 


o 


E f S CO 


S-l 











to &H CO 


C 






u 




a 










io co 


tO A! 


0) 


p 


■H 


EH OK 


1-3 




s 






c 






3 






a 














I-. !h 


+> 


a 


+-> 


O W F? 




to 









C 


c 


C C C B 


s 








"O 










CD 


co 


J3 





■H 


o c 


+J 


+> 


en 


rH 




o o 


o 


O O O 




o 




■a 




CO 


to 


to 






■ Q.-P 0< 


tssu -a 


o a s 


to 


u 


CO 


CO 




•H 


•H 


•H -H -H «H 


>>-H 




a) 


to 


o 


c 


c 






C O 


CD 


•H 




■a 


rH P -H o 





3 


w 


■ri 




• -p 


■P 


+J -P 4-> +> 


C 


■p 




O 


c 


PS 


•H 


•H 






3 


S rH 


J 


< 


CO 3 H * 


O 




C 




O* CO 


Rj 


rf rt a ctj 


o 


« 




PS 


•H 




CO 


a) 






S r-l 


rH 




p 




cj in tf 




CJ PS 


C 




CJ > 


> 


> > > > H 


> 




i-l 

rH 
CO 
■P 

to 
c 


CO 


rH 


u 


^ 






r-l 


0D CO 


O 


•H 


>> 


•H W to 


to 




K 







< u 


rl 


in r-i u u 





(h 




b 


rH 


a a 






,-i -H 


C 33 


■H 


3 


Sh 


k O SH 


*H XI 




•P < 




CD 





0) CD CD CD u 


CD 




o 


CO 










CO "H 


■H 


IH 


cr co 


-H T3 -H 


•H 


MS 


C Eh 




•O 10 


CO 


tn to co to 




to 






+-> 


E 


s 






•PTJA! C 


■H 


to 


h 


V > C CO 


CO 


■rl 




CO 




C C 


c 


c c c c 




c 




-D 


to 


u 


r( 






c c 


u s 


CO 


o 


J3 


to sh 3 a, as °3 


o a 




55 





o o o o 




o 




CO 


a 


o 


o 






CD (0 


fig 


ft 


3 


•H 


-H O 









•rl 




O O ' O i 




CJ 




o 


1— 1 


p 


•p 






PS J 




J 


BC to CO PS 


cs 




ca 


00 1 


















OS 




CO 


CO 












CO 














(0 


O i-l 


CM 


M CO CO CO 




m 




CM 




■* 










G5 r~{ iH r-i 


CM 


t» CO CO •<• •fl 1 'J' 


■f 




f 


m m 


CD 


r- l> 


C~ 


t~ t- t> t- 




r- 




O CO 


t» 


m 


CD 




to 


co t- r~ r~ 


t" 


Ol 


t- 


i> t- p- r~ 


t> 




t- 


t~ t~ 


H 


C 05 05 


05 05 05 05 05 




05 




05 t~ 05 


t- 


l> 




3 05 05 05 05 05 


rH 


05 


05 05 05 05 


05 




05 


05 05 


CJ 


OHH 


H 


rH rH iH i-l 




r-H 




rH 05 rH 


05 05 




O rH rH rH rH 


rH 




rH 


rH r-i rH r-i 


rH 




r-i 


rH rH 


■rf 
•p 
U 


•H 














rH 




r-i 


rH 




CD 

C 

al 








rH 














CO t- 05 


i-l 


CM 05 O rH 




00 




<D m 




rH 


. 


. 




00 m 05 CD CO 


■* ■* < o oo 


CM 




CO 


< < 


< 


>cococococo•<^''^ , 




■H 




ijJrH 05 


H 


t» 


t~ 




T-{ 


CM P) cm m 


rH 


rH 


rH 


CO 05 CO rH 


CO 




CD 


CM CD 




k 












a 












rH 






















rH 


-P -P 


■P 


P P -P P 




+> 




C P 


+J 


p 


+> 


+> 




-P -P 


+J p 


4-> 


■P 


P 


■P 4-> +J +5 


4-1 




•P 


P P 


CO 


in u u u ■** U U U 




< 




a < 


u u 

< < 


J9 


u 

< 




CJ 

to 




S! 


:H 'm tn Sh in 

< <c < << 


a 




a 


ti Sh 
< < 


o 















s 












•H 






















CD O 
Q, 






















S 























147 





o 


r- o 


lO 




o 


00 o 


<o 




o 


<D CD 


tp 




o 


t» CM 


M 


Q) 


in 


m m 


r^ 











a t- 


00 


•* m 


CM 


CS O t~ 


rH 


i-t 


on 


H P01 









oooaii'Ooi'H om 

cncCOCDOCOr-rHCMlO 

m tph in t^tDo^o r- ^ 
HomiooisiooinN 
cocoaiOr-iocnintDf- 

ocMrHino5ior--<i , cocM 

H MO MNN CO •<)< 00 
in >H iH rH 



C) 











> 


c 




0) 


a 


O 03 


rH 


•p 




nt 




rl 


co 




3 
W 


0) 




0> 


o 




3 


c 




C 


to 





0) 


rH 


+j 


> 


rtl 




0) 


n 




« 



in to 
oo t- 
co •* 



c 


1* 


a -p 


rH 


in 


<s 


<i) 


w 


OS 


■o 




(V 




T1 




C 




<D 




ft 





H 05 [» CO ■* 

h in co cm t> 

TJ< 0> t^ "* ■* 



oom-^oco^moco 
ot-M»OHos! mco 

Orionn^oH t~^ 
ocotfitf>ma)t~i-icMO 
mr-ti>(ooococot~oi-i 

HCOH^HO 1 * 01N 

co cm t> to cnco co co 

CM 05 rH CM 



rH J3 
cs rt 

-P rH 
O -H 

> 



ONtOOlOO 


IM 


ofiomo • 






oo 


o rH en i> o o 


«* 


o rH m co o o 


o 


m •■* oi t- o - 


*> 


« . . ~r4 


CO 


co co co m to 


rH 



CMC~0>rHC0t~00lDOin 

cocoascocorHr-c-mcM 

OOCDOOmocDtDt-CMOO 

onwmmt>^oio)ii 

CMCOOOr-OCOOCMlOO 

rHCOintOOOOCMOlCMtfl 

rHCOOO'tfCOOOOCJlCOrH 

CO ^f CO rH rH CM CO 



u 


<H g 

to o 
c u 



a o 

CS P 
rl 

H 



t> o 

CO o 
t~ o 



o 


CO 


m 






CO 


o 


05 


o> 






05 


CO 


X 


lO 






CO 


oo 


CM 


1-t 






CO 


rH 


•-i 


CO 






rH 














m 


o 


CO 

m 

rH 






05 
CM 
CM 


o o 








00 05 


t> 


o o 








05 m 


m 


oo o 








oo <-< 


oo 


oo o 








CM CD 


c- 


00 o 








r-l CO 


to 














CO o 








o in 


05 


t> cm 








t- CM 


00 


i-* co 










m 














CM 






o 
o 

in 

rH 

CO 

CO 




CM 

o 
o 

m 

r-< 

co 
co 



I 

•H 
rl 01 

ft a 
o o 
u -h 
ft+j 

ft oi 

< 



O CM 00 
O •* CD 


o 
o 


o 

rH 


O rH 05 
O rH in 

in •* O) 


o 
o 
o 


rH 
CO 








oo co 


ft 
co 


CO 
00 



o o 
o o 


o o 
o o 


o o 

O r-t 


o o 
o o 
■* o 


o o 
m o 
o o 


o •-< 
o t- 
O 00 



O CO 
O 00 



0) 

o 

c £ in 

mot- 

rH fc 05 
t« <H rH 
00. 



G 

o 
o 

CO 

a> in 

r-< 3 

cj o 



O 
IO i-t 
t> 

05 [8 0) 

rA f-i i-t 

rH iH 

m -h -h 
t> CD ca 

05 
» -H -rl 

<t <a d 

Eh ft ft 

fflCB 
SDS 

in in m 
t> t» c- 

05 05 05 



01 



01 3 



rH G ft 
•H O 

m -h o 

p ti 

■a <s +> 

•h > cs 

HOD 
ft C J3 
C (U H 
S OS 

m 

to to t- 

t- C- 05 
05 OS rH 
r~4 r-i 



O -H 

r 

a 



- - -m 
to t- < o o oo 

CO Tf CO CO ■* rH 

t 

< p -p -p -p -p p 

■ r< Sh rl J< tl rl 

■ <<<<<< 



oolocOTjiocococMcoin 

OeO«OOOMOOO(OH 

CMCMCOOTOcomosinin 

rHcocotomOTtomcM<D 
rHincorHCM^mcocoo 

rH rH ■* CM iH rH 







s 






o 






•H 


>> 




•p m 


■P 




•H C 3 


<D 




to o o 


•H 


C 


■ri vH © 


CS 


o 


3 4-> G 


to w 


■H 


D< eS ID IS 


>. 


+-| 


O > bflrH 


rH (SO 


IS 


< rl IS rH 


O rl rl S -H 


(1) 


<D C <u 


O 11 «£H 


rl 


■a in -h o 



ftJ2 V S MX! O G C cS 01 

(0«llH3«i0n'H 

orascoKftoSrHOQa 



148 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1976 



Employees' Payroll Deductions: 
Federal Withholding Taxes 
State Withholding Taxes 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield 
Group Life Insurance 
United Fund 
U. S. Savings Bonds 



School Aid 

Title I 
Title 
Title 
Title 
Title 

Title I 

Title I - 

Title I - 

Title I - 

Title I - 

Title I - 
P.L. 874 

Title I - 

Title II 
Title 



Federal Grants: 

- Project No. OM 75 4498 

- P.L. 92-318 - Project 5847S 

- Project 74 18 ID 

- Project OM 7505S 

- Project 7404M 

- Project 7504M 
Project 76-007-222 
Project MH MA 76-26 
Project 76-009-054 
Project 76-009-046 
Project 75-009-033 

E.S.E.A. 
■ E.S.E.A. 



$ 1,538,655.08 

483,010.35 

166,285.47 

20,647.89 

4,296.15 

22,406.25 



348.25 

2,098.72 

1,765.54 

483.86 

394.50 

1,646.24 

20,631.42 

1,036.33 

21,027.59 

35,085.49 

2,104.72 

65,442.99 

46,470.00 

10,348.05 

111.72 



State and County Assessments : 
County Tax 

State Recreation Areas 

State Examination of Retirement System 
Ipswich River Watershed District 
Merrimack Valley Air Pollution Control District 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Group Insurance - Elderly 
Group Insurance - Retired Teachers 

Refunds : 

Real Estate Taxes 
Personal Property Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Water Rates and Services 
Sewer Charges 
Miscellaneous 



491,452.29 

122,228.91 

251.10 

574.57 

2,512.42 

2,347.80 

633.27 

22,508.77 



41,869.16 

342.60 

18,927.80 

4,127.22 

192.84 

2,820.78 



149 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1976 (Continued) 

Police Off-duty Details 97,841.33 

Police Legal Advisor 11,260.20 

Trust Funds 114,822.00 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 5,150.00 

Purchase of Trash Bags 69,240.76 

Dog Licenses toCounty 6,795.75 

Sale of Dogs 174.00 

Walter Raymond Welfare Fund 537.40 

Lucy Shaw Welfare Fund 787.33 

Revenue Cash Investments 23,900,000.00 

Non-Revenue Cash Investments 2,900,000.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Investments 1,550,932.25 

Temporary Loans 500,000.00 

Insurance Claim Recoveries 6,878.19 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 154,968.15 

Other Expenses 311,577.49 

Andover Athletic Association 14,721.50 

Tailings 209.17 

Retirement System 313,259.00 

Non-contributory Pensions 40,051.38 

Mini-Bus Grant * 384.00 

Meals Tax 1,225.74 

Payroll - Vacation Advance 3,428.30 

Miscellaneous 197.00 

33,159,527.08 



150 



oo 


rH 


co 


CD 


C£> 


X 






m 


•* 


oo 


m 


to 


■* 



rH O 

to [> 


i-l 

co 


to en 
CM o 


m 

CO 


IN 00 

cm co 
to CM 


rH 

to 
oo 


Tf rH 
CM •* 

to to 


in 
to 

CM 










co rH 
w 




co <-< 
co •* 
m o 


o 
oo 
in 










rH 


rH 


rH CM 

m 


co 
m 





o 


in 


in 


o 




© 


CM 


CM 


o 




o 


CM 


CM 


o 




o 


CO 


CO 


o 


•o 


o 


en 


CO 


to 


he 3) 


•s 


*. 


- 


at 


C -P 


CM 


o 


I-l 


rH 


•H 0! 


rH 


in 


o 


to 


!h CD 


rH 


m 


to 




OS > 




V. 


■t 




J3 C 




rH 


r-l 




CO rH 










CD 


00 


0) 


in 


CM 


3 rH 


m 


O 


CM 


^ 


c ca 










u 


OS 


rH 


CM 


co 


> 


CO 


1< 


CO 


■* 


s 


co 


CO 


en 


m 


OS 










o 


to 


rH 
O 


o 
o 


i> 



cj> oo 
co in 




to m 

[> CM 


rH 
O 


■* en 
en co 

co co 


ro 
co 

CM 


m cm 

O CO 

t> en 


CO 
CO 

to 










co to 

m 

in 


o 
to 
m 


to o 


in 

CO 

to 












O CM 

m 


CM 

m 







■o 


•* 


CM 


to 























-p 


CM 


en 


r-l 








V) 


in 


in 


rH 


i 




■p 





rH 


c- 


en 






c 


> 


•. 




«. 






tS 


a 


I> 


rH 


oo 




a, 


rH 


rH 


o 


rH 


rH 




< 


ft 




rH 


•* 


m 




o 














w 














OS to 


■p 












t» 


a 












en 


v> 


rH 










VI r-l 


E 


CS 


CO 


rH 


rH 


co 


Eh 


•P 


U 


o 


on 


■* 


in 


Z " 


ni 







• 




■ 


5 o 





C 


CO 


r-l 


en 


m 


O CO 


£ 





en 


in 


rH 


CM 


o 


O 


CO 


in 


en 


o 


CJ 








■s 


n 


■i 


< a 








to 


CM 


■* 


3 








t^ 


C- 




►-) 








m 


in 




X 














w 














< 















o 


3 




o 


o 


o 


o 




c -a 


o 


o 


o 


o 




















> -p 


o 


o 


o 


o 







tfl 


o 


o 


o 


o 




OS 





o 


o 


o 


o 






> 












fi 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 







i-l 


o 


o 


in 


m 




a 




CO 


en 


t- 


■v 



V 




o 




c 




a! 




rH 




as 




a 




bo 




c 


10 


•rH 


■P 


c 


a 


c 


•H 


•H 





ho 


O 








CO 


OS 



X) 


■ 











o 


o 


O 


o 


-p 


o 


o 


© 


o 


3 ttl 


o 


o 


© 


o 


a 


M 


K 


* 




> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


> c 


in 


o 


in 


o 


l-H 


en 


en 


to 


CM 


os 


■V 




■, 






■# 


co 

CM 


in 

CM 


CO 



in 






t^ 


o 






1 


1 




10 


O 


rH 
1 




-p 
e 


CO 

l 


t» 






E 


to 




in 










■p 


CO 


4) 


u 


ft 


In 


O 


C 


•H 


3 


c 


« 





XI 


a 


rH 


O 


tA 


rH 


14 





•H 


a 


m 


OS 


Q 


CD. 



151 



o 
o 


rH 


00 


O l> 


o 
o 


«4i in 
H o 


o 
o 
o 


CD 

m 

iH 


CO 
00 


00 o 
IN 00 
CN CO 


i> 


to 

CM 

G5 


VI 


M 


n 


•N *» 


•» 


•* 


o 
o 

CM 


o 

CO 


CD 

co 

LO 


00 l> 

ifj iH 

t> in 


CO 

o 


rH 
t> 



"tf 



o 

u 
o 



wco 
p fr- 
iz; O) 
H iH 
> 

OS O 
CO 

fe (D 

o a 
w 

M 

co 

< 



Sh CO 










a u 










IS] O 










Oj >> co 




-P 






fcuO (0 











Q) C Sh <D 




h CD •• 




73 


•P H o co 




CD Si CO 




«H 


03 -P -h co 




a co cd 




O CO 73 


Jh Jh < 




•H 




>» -P S 


Qt 




co a > 




-p co a 


XS in 




-P 03 




;h co -h a 


a <h 




ftOH 




x to 


•p a in o a 




•H CD 




a o o a 


& t> 




PS X 




O X C O 


ID OO 01 0] 


-P 


O oS 





U OS S -rl 

a -p 


fi Hh O+J 


CD 


- -p 


-p 


+j »+> a 


OS CO 


rt 


COW d 


■PH (J 0)i! 


Sh - 


-p 


iH -H O -H -P 


0o3coSEcot3oco 


to 


eS -P m G 


O -H CO 




CO u 


w 


a co cs jh a 


3 T3 £ -P CO 


a-p to o 




o -p a o s 


T3 O CO 


o3 


a co 


iH 


co a-H «h s-< -p 


-P !h CO 





e co co 


oj 


fn -h +-> co a CO 


h o a u to 


0) 


•H CO 





co c a 3 


>S0o3os-p<:co 


OS ft O W cTi < -r-j 


o > 




CO to 




Sh 73 


H O 




w < 




tf H < 



m 
•a i> 

cn 

■P rH 

o - 

> iH 

co 



00 O O O CN 

■* o o o •* 


o o 
co o 


ooi>i>ooi>coco^m 

iH00CNi>l>i>00COTjHin 


rH 


CO 

co 




to era m o i— i 
^mcooH 
m cn m o ih 


r-l O 
CN CO 
iH C3^ 


h i>(i oo m m h h m 
inTjicoom^oicNoo 

CNCOCOm05 , tfO>rHI> 


CO 

o 


oo 
o 
m 




*»*•*•%•> 


** «s 


•S •>, »| Wl rt •* *, 


** 


•» 




o co co t> o 

00 rH CN <N O 
CN CO CN 


CN CD 
CO CO 
CO 


CN CM O CM CO CM l> 

cn cn mm 

iH CN 


00 
CO 


oo 




iH 






rH 


tH 





E 


-P 
CO 

>, 

CO 



CO 

c 
o 

•H 
CO 
C 

a 

>> 

O 

3 73 



CO 

-P 

c 


s 

CO 
CO 



CO 
CO 

CO < 



rH >> 



CD -P 

co a 
r> 

S 

Sh 
M 
■P -H 

a-p 
a 

J3 OS 

cj 



o 

Q 

O 
H 



O 


£2 S 


M 


-P -H 3 




-P 


CO c 


S C 


M & 


-P O > 


o 


M M 


«H Eh 


hD-H | 


CO 


X) -P C CO 


c +j 


3 O 
ca « S5 OS 


rt cj 



c 
o 

•rt 

03 o3 



CO 
3 



Eh 
iH 13 

o3 a 



>> 03 



H (J+f .ri « 
O -P 
03 



a 

3 

o a-p 

CO o3 O K> CO 

-p 

CO 



o 


a-p 



•H 

CQ 

X 

oj 
b^ 


CO 
•H 

o 

X 

w 

CO 



rH 
O 
•H 

S ■$ 
> 

-P 

CO ^ 

>> o 

en -p 

o 



co 

CO 
!h 
U 
•H X! 

-P o 
03 
OS 
Eh 
>> 

■H T3 
h 
!h 
T3 -H CO 
iH -P 03 
H 

OS M 



n 
o 

O -H 

C -P 
03 03 
U 
3 Sh 
CO O 

a 

M OS 



CO 
■P CD 

ftr> 

•H C3> 
iH 



■p a 

iH 3 +-> 
03 O OS 
U -P 

mow 



a m 
o 
■H > 
+J -H 

3 OS 
iH 

rH a 




T3 t« 


■P rH 

03 03 

S 

•H CO 

■P -H 

CO Ph 

w 



fi 



^ CO 

•h a 



!H CO 

O -P 

h a 



>»s 

03 -P 
H CO 
^ 3 
-r-5 
> 73 



O o<c 





3 

a 

> 


OS 

CO 
3 
iH 

a 

H 

3 
CO 

O 

•P 



o 

a 

o3 
rH 
03 

CD 



152 



OOOHM* 


■* Oi 

O H 


N N OHIO tO 


CM O 
CD 05 



■* t> CO CO 05 CD 


CO CO 


O CO lO CM 


CO 


CM 


TP 



CM 



O 

cj 



w 

H 
> CD 

« Oi 



CO - 
DO 

h3 co 

Ph 

05 

6 C 
CO 3 

1-3 

Eh 

o 



CO 
I— I 
CO 

>H 
<: 
< 



lO 






t- co co 




CO P 


O CD CD 




o c 


rH l> O 




«H 05 3 


Jh 




O rH 


hQ,? 




O 


os a o to 




•> O 


U)d (CC 




P CO < 


>* O G 




O CM 


oi 3 




> 




rH 3 


Cj rH 




>>vH G 


O G 03 




01^^(1) 


CO O ?■< rH 


to 


p a > 


•H -H 3 P 


c 


a -o < 


Ph p p -h 


03 


P£ 


S O 55 


3 


S co be 

p o c a 


OS 4H 




CO rH -H 


kt 1 o 


c 


3 P Sh 


<H ,"-q 





•n <h 


5h Jh 




"O CO 


CD rH CD 


e 


oS S 


O 03 =H =H 


3 


H O 


C -H CO CO 


•H 


P O c c 


a o a a 


s 


•H -H > oS 


rH CD OS OS 


CD 


T3 P rH 


03 Q,U U 

m co h h 


& 


3 U H oS 
<5 <3 CO. 



CM CO CO 




o 




o 




05 




O l> 05 


CO 


CO t> CM 




© 




o 




LO 




O CO 05 


l> 


• • 


• 




• 




• 




• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


CO CM CM 




l> 




co 




t> 




o co 


i-\ 


1-^ 


r-i 05 C5 




cx> 




t> 




CO 




O CO 


t> 


CM 


CM CO CO 




CO 




CD 




t> 




O ■* CD 


CM 


CO O C5 




t> 




C5 




CO 




m 


CM 


CO 


O 


CM 






CO 








05 




co 

rH 




CO 
CM 

CM 


co 
co 

CO 


faD 




G 








bJD 














c 











• 


G 














•H 




•H 






P 


■H 














p 




P 






O 


P 




















oS 






O 







P 















•H 






< 


















s 




r< 
ft 









§ 




> 






t> 




c 











O 


G 




>> 






C55 




5 




u 






•H 


S 




X! 






r^ 









a 






> 


o 














Eh 




< 






!h 




H 





P 






rK 
OS 




<H 








i 


CO 


<h 




03 











O 




>> 

as 







p 







U 






>H 




LO 




=s 




CO 


,Q 







X 


faJD 




<-< 




p l> 


C XI 




a 


s 


p 


CO 


03 


G CD 




03 




C5 





bfl 










O P 


•H t> 




O 




> <-i X 


•H 




a 




> 05 




P 05 




CO 






os a in 


ti 


o 




rH 





<-i 




•H 




>> •> 


Eh 




CM 


p 


>> 




G 







Ph 




& CO 




CO 






X3 


X 


P 


S •> 


CO 






K 


CO 


p 







r< 




CD 




CD 


P 


O 




OS CO u 







u 


3 





CO 


CM 





G CM 


c 


P 




Eh Jh 


rH 


r< 





CO 


<H 


u 




O 


& 









.Q P 





p 


CO 


CO 





r^ 


3 


O r-i 


s 







>»«H 


■H 


<H 


a 


HH 


C <H 


•H 


TJ H -rH 


p 


o 




P CO P 


H 


CO 


OS 




oS 


CO 


U 





U 


CO 


G 




CCO 
3 OS O 


X 


C X! 


T3 Sh 
C H 


a a *h «h a 3 os 

OJ < 0< 'T-l 




S£ 


oS ^ 
Eh Eh 






ca 




£ 






Eh 




T» OS 





153 



o o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

CO t> 

O CN 



& 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 

o 

00 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 

o 
o 

CO 
03- 



Q 
W 



> 

OS co 
W i> 

COGJ 

WH 

o 

EhCO 

o 

CD 

c 

CO 3 

to 



CD 

x 
p 

o 

>> 

p 

•H 

s-f 
o 
x 
p 



be 








G 






be 


•H 






G 


+-> 






•H 


CD 






P 


(1) 






(D 


s 






CD 
S 


c 








ES 






g 









& 


H 






o 

Eh 


«H 








o 









CD •• 


CO 






P lO 


3 




CD CD 


t- 


H 




P t> 


> CD 


a 




05 


rH 


h 




> lH 


>> 


3 






& - 


CO 




>> - 


rH 




C 


X5 CD 


tn co 


>> 


CN 


u 


rt 


•H 


U 


CD X 


rH 


P 


CD iH 


«H O 


u 


«S 


«H -H 


w u 


CD 


X 


CO Sh 


g a 


> 


d 


g a 


a s 


OH 


d < 


fn 






h 


E-« 






Eh 



OOOOCDOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCO^COCO 

ooooi>oooNooooooofflooiHN^nnm 




O 

O 


NooNWo^oHoooooomcaNonNmHrtin 

CCONifiHlfiNiONOOOOOOHlOlfitrin^lONCO 
t»OH00MO(JlfflOISHOOOin[«MSOHt»inHO1 


CD 
CO 


o 
o 
o 


in CO^HNH® rHrHCN^aimCOrH CO iH iH Irt rH CN CN 

h h m h 

#3-#3- 


CT> 
CO 


o 
o 

CM 



> 

u 

CD 
CO 



a 
g 
o 

CO 

in CQ 

CD CD 

Oh CO 

I C 



£ 
£ 
>» O 
Xi O 

CQ CD 
U O 

cd a 



CJ W 

CO CD 

G X 

►h P 

o 

rH I 

d G 

O CD 



CD CQ 

a 

X H 

W cti 

c 

^ o 

CD CQ 

XI Sh 
P CD 
O ft 

I I 

• G 

P o 



CQ 
CD Sh 

CQ CD 
C X! 
CD P 
aO 



X -H 

G 
cr 
w 



w 



be w 

C I 
•H <tf 
CQ t* 

d o 

X lH 



CQ CQ 

CD 

CQ CQ 

g a 

CD CD 

a P. 

X! X 

W W 

^ Si 

0) CD 

X X 

P P 

o o 



CD CO 

a 

X rH 

W d 

g 

Sh O 
CQ 



CO 

CD 
CO 

G 
CD 

a 

w 

■ 

X 



E 
p 

CJ 
CD 



d Eh 



U 

p 
o 


rH 
W CO 



O o 
I u 

P ex 
a 

iH 

P d 



a O W O «aj 



«. 


p 





o 


a cq 


CO 





c 




Q 


3 










r-i 


CJ 





CJ 




■H 


•H 


G 


P 


rH 


& 


u 








< 


a Eh 



o a 

i i 

p bo 

a 

OS 
P 

og 

x 

p • 

H O 

ri 

rH 

X w 



«H 

O 
I G 

• 

P CO 

a 
- 
Q cq 



>> 
a >> 
ss o 

X rH 

bo a 

•H E 

X w 



CQ 

CQ 
G 


a 
x 

w 

CQ U 

G 

O X 

•H P 

CQ O 

G I 



a o 

G 
>> d 
U G 



CO 

CQ 
CQ G 




CO 


cq pq 

X Jh G 

p u 
d x a 
i p x x 

CQ O Eh" P 



I 

$-i 



P X 

p p 

•H O 

E I 

E • 
O P G 

o a o 


P rH 



H 

u cj 

G 
P 3 
rt O 
SsO 



CQ CQ CQ 



CQ CQ CQ 

G G G 



a a a 

www 

!h U U 


XXX 

p p p 

o o o 

1 I I 

U rH • 

bo o 0. 
rt G 
G 3 P 
«J O 
SOX 



CQ CQ 
G X 

MOW 

g a 
x u 
aw 
X x 

W U P 

o 

U X 



P 

x O 
p I 



I 

CO 
bd 
G 
H 

I P T3 
H arH 
O -H 
U P 3 
p CQ 
S G 

O O rH 

'J -H d 

p 
H d 

d O 

E ^ -rt 
HOG 
G 



a 

•H 



<C OS s 



m- 



CQ 

G 

rH 

a 
u 

G 
CO 

>, 

rt 

rH 

in 

> 

o 

o 

p 




G 
d 

rH 

R5 
CO 



154 





to 






r> 






05 






r-H 






„ 




03 


o 




w 


CO 


CO 


> 




H 


o 


w 


55 


o 


55 


t> 


55 


& 


O 


< 


•"5 


O 

o 


Eh 


1 


< 


o 








Eh 


HH 


55 


Eh 


< 


iS 


w 


OS 


O 


a 


H 


H 


CO 


55 
Eh 




w 


O 




o 






55 






< 






J 






< 






OQ 



















m 


CM 


rH 




00 
















o 


CO 


o 




05 
















o 


CO 


00 




m 
















00 


m 


05 




m 


CO 














o 


CO 


m 




00 


> 














CM 


■<* 


00 




CM 














CO 


r-i 


TH 






K 


















tH 






Eh 
























03 


.. 






















H 
OS 


ffitSOO 




rH 


"* CM 




■* 










con 




tH 


o -^ 




05 










Q 

55 
< 


•h m co 




t> 


iH CO 




05 










P tH rj> 




m 


ITS 05 




iH 










umo 




CO 


Oi 05 




CO 












3 «3- 




* 








mk 










CO 

Eh 


■a 




CO 


<* 








r-i 










a> 


bD 




CM 


O 









CO 






W 
H 


Q co 


c 






c 


c 






>> 






73 


•H 






aj 


cd 






rJ 








■H G 


■a 






£n 


fn 






& 




Cfl 


■H O 


rH 







3 


3 




CO 


X, 




.* 


H- 1 

CQ 


O CQ 





3 




CO 


CO 




p 


fac 







u 


XI 


rH 




c 


a 




•H 


•H 







< 


>> Cfl 


X 


CQ 




I— 1 


I-H 




CO 


K 




XI 


tH 


«S b0 73 P 


1 










o 






u 


Oh G G 


•H 


CO 







r-I 


a 


O 








•H 3 St 


CO 




IH 


«H 


a 





P 




73 




- > Eh 




73 


■H 


•H 


G 


Q 











co a 


iH 


CO U 


H 


HH rJ 


o 




73 




s 




CO 73 


Oj 


U 









•H 


>» 


•H 


CO 


•H 







!h 


X 


■H 


a 


ap 


+-> 


<! 


fan rt 




>> • P 





a 


X 


3 


3 


a 


G 




G r-i 




O CO -H 


■OH D 


W 





o o 


«J 





•H 







rH • a 


0) 


rH 




iH 


u 




U 


4-> 


r-i 


c 




as & Eh 


Cfl 




o o 




C3 


CS 


•H 


£> 




s 














3 


P 


CS 






Eh 














O 


!/} 


H 







• 




oo 

CO 
00 

TH 

o 
r> 

rH 
CD 


rH 
CO 


o o 
o o 


CO O 

in o 


o 
o 


• 


• • 


• • 


• 


CM 
CM 

CO 


oo o 

CO o 
CM CD 


m o 

CN O 

o o 


o 
o 
o 


m, 


•t Ml 


•s *\ 




CO 

m 


rH rH 
CO 


o 

CM 


o 
m 
TH 



o 
o 

CM 

00 
CO 



co o t> 

CO O CO 



T* m 
co co 

rH CO 
CO 
73 

a 

3 
Eh 



hh 73 rH 

G Eh 


s >» 

>> u 

- a 

Eh 03 P 

-, * 

■P J s 

CO 

3 & U 



CO 
73 

G 

3 



re 

x 

CO 

>» 


3 



i> 

CO 
CM 
05 

CO 

oo 



CO 

73 

c 



4-> 
•H 
Eh 



73 
•H 

< 



O 

o 

X 



CO 



m 

CO 



CD 

CM 

CO 

TH t> TH 

CO O CO 

CO ^ o 

t> CM i> 

th co 00 

05 CD CD 

S 

u 

O 



CO 

73 X 





a 

3 

bo 

G iH 
■H O 

> o 

H X 

o o 

> co 



03 



>> 
-P 

3 

Q 
I 

«H 
«H 

o 



rH 
O 
O -H 

XJ tH 

° P 

co a 









CO 


CO 

o 








m 

05 


CO 
CD 
00 








CM 
CM 

CO 


1-i 
m 


o co 

00 CO 


o co 

CM CO 


O T-t 

oo co 


TH 05 O 
CO O CM 


r-i CM 

H C5 


05 O 
05 CO 
H tH 


CO ■> 

00 "^ 


CO o 
t> CM 


oo oo m 

05 CO O 
CM rH i> 


t> m 

CO CM 
CM CD 


* 


•« 


*« «* 


Pk »\ »\ 


•n m 


m 


iH 
1 


CO t> 

CO 


O rH CO 
r-i CO 
CM 


CM CM 



r-i 



CO 



CO 
Eh 
Eh 
W 
CO 

<: 



ton 
G 
•H 

u 
a 

x 

CO 



3 
G 

> 





-P 

G 



CO 

p 

G 


s 

■p 

en 

> 
c 

03 rH 0)HH 



G 

S 
p 
73 rt 



P U 
CO Eh 



BJ d 

m in G > U 

C 

•• G T3 C5 "H 4-> 

X eg 

CO O Eh ^ 

a 
o 



U 
3 
G G 

O > 

03 



Cfl 

P 
G 
3 
C S 
P 
> CO 


03 > 

G 

G M 

O 

55 



X 
> 

•H 



O 


03 

CO •• 

P CO 

G 

3 X 

O rt 

H 
O 
< 



P 

u 



a 

o 
.. u 0) 
co a ■(-> 
t> nj 
05 H P 
H pj Cfl 

G " 

O 

CO 

u 



<H 

o 



z& 



Eh 



>» 

P 

fn 


a 
o 

th a p 

C5 H P 

H rt Cfl 

G Efl 
<H O 

O Cfl H 

^ PS 

>> 

> a 03 





a 
o 

m a 
t> 

05 rH 



a a a 



!h 


a 
o 

co a 

05 rH 



G 
O 

•H 
P 

bX) 



rH CIS CO 

G Eh 

«H O 

O CO H 

>> 

> a 03 



«H O 

o co 

rH 



T 

p p 

crj -H 

H +J _3 
cj CO 

G Eh G 
H 



OS CO 



>> 

> a 03 x 

3 Eh 



CQ 
G 
O 
•H 
CO 
CO 



CO 
CO 

cS 



155 





O) o o o 
00 o o o 


O 
O 


O 


o 
o 


CO 

o 


l> 
CM 


rH 

o 


O 

o 


CO 

t> 


CO 
CM 


00 
rH 


CM 
if) 
CM 


co i> en o 

^ono 

to CO CO o 


o 
o 
If) 


CO 
CO 
CO 


co 
t> 

c© 


CM 

CO 

co 


if) 
CO 

o 


0) 

co 

CO 


CO 
CO 


If) 

CO 
0) 


t> 

rH 


00 
CD 
CJ) 


•N 


*•»■%** 


•* 


•s 


«t 


•* 


*. 


* 






n 


•s 


CO 

w 


00 t> CM O 
If) O ^ if) 
CM CO H 


CD 
CO 
CD 


co 

CM 


If) 

CO 


CM 


CO 


o 

rH 






co 


O) 



00 



CO 



























C lO O CM 




















CO 

H 
> 
OS 

w 

CO 

w 


















•rl • • • 
P If) CO CO 




































(JCOOOl 
























t> 












•H CO rp O 
























t> 




73 








Sh - 


n 
























0) 













aO) 


CO 
























rH 




3 








O 


CM 




























CO 




T3 




ri 






















P 

<! 






to 




CO 




s 





a 


























a 




■H 


73 


3 


3 


a 


























o 




s 


c 


fi 


iH 


< 






















10 




t> -H 




& 


£ 




£* 














■p 










CO 


d) 


s 


O CO 






CO 


> 


u 












o 










CJ 





0) s 




T3 




p 















rl 


•H 










c 


•H 


iH (1) 




a 





3 


5* 


<H 










o 


rl 










H 

Eh 
l-H 


a 


p 


a 




rt 


p 


o 




CO 








en 


4-> 










rH 


CCJ 


a 


t>- 




«J 




j 


-o 











•H 


CO 










a 


•rl 


>>t> 


T3 


+-> 


>> 




CO >>-H 








> 


•H 


en 








CQ 


u 


P J-i 0) 





CO 


ri 


<H 


> rl rl 


rl 








■o 


o 


a 








ca 
< 




at> 


CO 


rH 


N 


w 








rl 


CJ 








«s: 




ctJ 








3 


l> 


>>P 




•H 




P 




P C 


rl 










rl 







CO 







ri 0) CO 3 T3 


Sh 


iH 





T3 


CO -H X) 


CO 


CO 




<-\ 





J 




t" 






•H 


ftiH 


X) 


3 


O 


cd 


a 


3 


S X! 


•H 





bC 




a 


> 






o 


/-N 


4-> 


a 


P -H 


£ 


X! 








«i 


PS O 


J 


K 







bO 


•H 


s 




iH 


• 




c3 


<rH 


s u 


P 


PS 


CJ 


J 


bfl oS 




cct 


Q 




3 


PS 


o 






P 




•H 





P 




3 








CO C S 





Eh 












p, 


3 




ri 


u 


a c 





<C 


«H 


<H 


<H 


P -H 


p 




<H 






XJ 


e 




o 







a 


3 -P 


O 


> 







o 


o 


a.* 73 




>> 


o 







O 


3 


PS 


CO 


O 




o 


c a 


u o 


!h 


CO 








•ri U CS73 


p 






O 


•H 


•rl 


w 




••— / 




u 


CD o 


•H 1 





c 











cci 


•H 


s 







■H 


S 


a 


> 


w 






a 


> cj p a 


CO 


a 


rH 


iH 


iH 


o a os o 


3 


rH 




rH 


CO 





o 




CO 




a 


<o 








3 


ci 


a 


CS 







o 


a 







a 


& 


Q 


2 


Eh 




o 


ps 


PS S3 PS 


co 


CO 


CO 


PS 




CJ 


CO 




a 


i— i 


< 


•"3 


o 




































& 




CJ 




































o 


Eh 


CJ 

< 








0) 
CO 












CO 
0) 








CM 
CM 








S5 


H 






















• 








• 








is 


a 


J 








-tf 












CO 








m 








o 


CO 


< 








CJ) 












CD 








o 








Eh 


H 
CJ 

< 

CQ 


ps 
w 

w 
o 








CM 

iH 
CD 
CO 












If) 

CM 








CO 

CM 
CM 









CO 
CD 



CO 
If) 





CO CM ^ l> 


















O O O CM 




O) 00 o ^ 




cn o o o t> 






o m 




00 H 




co co o 




O O rH H 




m o o co 




■H • • • • 






0) o 




O t> 




co m oo 




• • • • 




• 


• • • 




O CO O iH if) 






• • 




• • 




• • • 




CO CM M CM 




CM 


m o co 




x o o m co 






O CM 




"* "* 




O CJ) CO 




CJ) 00 CJ) CO 




m 


t^ TJH CJ) 




w r-i co co m 


•o 




CM CO "O 




CM CM 




ih m cn 




CO o o •>* 




CJ) 00 o 




W *S n M 







CM 




r-f CO 




t>- 




•» *s »* M 




•* 


•* •* 




rl CO O t> O 


T3 




-'0 












0(CH^ 




cn m •• ih 




CM CO O 


T3 




j-i T3 












rH 




<cf 


cn 


CO 


rH CO 


<fl 




< 






• ■ 






(0 




rH 





Eh 


■H 












P 






P C 






X 


H 


cct 


CO rl 




rl 






to 






COP 






a 


CO 


£ 


P 


















-H C 






t-> 


CO 


C & 




P 






u 






p a P 








<! 









CO CO C3 




m co 


co m co 




c p o3 a 






o m co 




o3 


a to 




t> t> £: 




t* t> 


p 


t> t^ t> 




rl rH P 






p i> r> 




co ■* m co 


to 




CD CJ) 




CJ) CJ) 


S CJ) CJ) CJ) 




EUn^ 






CJ) O) 




t> o t^ t> 


CO T3 


• • 


rH rH T3 




rH rH 


i— i 


rH rH rH 




p a a a 






TJHH 




rH 0) O) 0) CJ) 





CO 





CO 








rH 


ri p a 











fj rH rH rH rH 


CO 3 


<H <H C 


«H «H "O <H «H <H 


ed 


a o co 

a c q 






■O <h m 




•H 


CO 


X 


O 


X 


O O 





O 


P 






CO T3 O O 




J3. <H <H tH «H 


< -H 


CTJ 


•H 


a 




P 




C 


>>r-l 






< 




O O o 


P 


Eh 


>> >>P Eh 


>. >>P 


>>>»>> 


Q C3 rH 






o >> >> 




> 


rH in 




> > rl 




> > 


•H 


> > > 


a 


S rl O 




to 


•H [0 > > 




>>>.>>>> 


a O 


o 


^a 


o 


S3 


£ 


333 


p 


X! O 


• • 





> C 

rl >H J 




rl > > > > 


•nap 


p 


£ 


rl 


rl be S X! 


rl 


P 




5^3^,3 


o a 
< 




a 
< 






o 

CJ 




Oj -H -H fj 

afe a co co 



P 


OS -H 
PS CO J 







a 



















CJ 








s 


CO 














Q 




& 




* 



156 



CO 


i-l 


CO 


1< 


o 


O 

o 


CM 
CO 


O 


o 

CD 


o 
o 


CM 

in 


o 
o 


O 

o 


CM 


l> 

r-i 
CD 


m 

CM 
O 


t> 

rH 

m 


00 
CO 

oo 


o 

CD 
O 


CO 
r-i 

m 


r-i 


05 

r-i 
O 


o 
m 

r-i 


oo 

CO 

o 


o 

r-i 
iH 




*. 


«v 


•t. 


•* 


*. 


•» 


•* 




•* 




*» 


•* 




CO 


O 

m 


^ 


CM 

m 


CO 


co 

CO 


r-i 




co 




■^ 


iH 











CO 








































> 


• • 


CO 00 Oi 





































(0 •* 00 CO 


















p 


















OS 


p 


• • • 


















«j 


















w 


CO<*0) 


















p 


















CO 

w 

OS 


CD ■># CO 


















CO 


















S co oo o 




































CD 


^ •* ** 


















1 


















Q 
55 


4-> 


m co i> 






















to 














c<j 


CO o 














co 




to 



















X) 


r-i 








to 


• • 




s 




c 




•iH 















<! 


<5 










rH 




bJD 
S 





•H 




o 

•H 




rH 




P 
<3J 


t^ 










CO 


rH 








p 


s 


•H 




CO 




p 




> 


P 


t^ 










w 


o 








s 


•H 


rH 




3 




OS 








CO 


05 










rH 
Eh 


tH 








c« 


b5 


CC5 




rp 




u 


P 


y 




rH 


















rH 


P 


xj S 




a 




Si 


a 





1 












rH 


XJ 








Oh 


S 


CO o 











p 


Oh 




to 



















p 





y 




>> 




rH 


CO 




p 


U 










rH 

< 


> 






CO 


P s 


u 


a 




rH 


X 







s 


3 


X 3 










u co m cd 




3 


3 3 




3 »-< 







Bi 


U 


i 


•H 


a 


cd e3 






CO 




(1) [>- t> t> 




r-H 


CD O 





a 




-P 


H 






e« 


u 


H > 






t^ 






tfl C5 O Oi 




a 


a u 


p 


P 




3 




i-t 


to 


rH 


o 


•o 






Oi 




r-i i-\ r4 




h 


P o 


[0 


> c 


CD 


X3 


to 


a 


p 


O 




< 






r-i 


y^S 




OS 






3 


a < 


a 





CO 


•rH 


<-i 


•H 


£ 




to 


P 








• 






«H «H «H 




CO 





& 


« s 


t> 


rH 


a 


c 


bfi 





A 


03 S 






■« 


P 




CO 


O 






rH 




p 




P 





a 


•H 


u 


P -H 






o 


C 




>> 






>. 


Eh S 


m 


r-i CO 


rH 


c 


s 





Ctf 


c 




to 




OS 


CO 







«!>,>>>> 




c« 


O 





a 





o 




p 




ri 


i 


w -o 




H 




y 




rH 


> > > 




l-i 


rH O 




rH > 


P 


o 





c 


rH 


rH 




■H 




> 


w 


^-/ 




Ph 


,3 3,3 




u 


3 





s 


a 


1 


P 





•H 


3 


•H 


rH «J 




o 


55 






(1) 




0) 


P rH 


r-i 


73 rH 


«S 


c 


a 


o 


> 


to 


3 


ns a 




Q 


5 


CO 




> 






> 


a 


a 





X! 


o 


p 


•H 


•H 


fl 


•rH 







13 


►"3 


Eh 




O 






O 


g£ 


CO 


Ph 


CJ 


z 


CO 


CQ 


CJ 


rH 


s 


C4 




< 


, 


55 
3> 




































Ph 




o 






t> 


o> 


























o 


O 


Eh 

Ph 


CJ 

o 






m 


o 


























o 

• 


Z 


Ph 


< 






r-i 


CO 


























o 


& 


K 








00 


o 


























o 


o 


CO 


j 






m 


m 


























in 


H 


w 
o 

< 
■H 
< 


< 
os 
w 

W 

o 






00 

m 


o 
p, 

CO 


























co" 

CD 
CO 









.. 


m ■* 






o 




o 




o 




o 






































10 C3 rH 






o 




o 




o 




o 






o 






O 




o 




o 


O 








o o 








>> 


• 


• 






• 




• 




• 




• 






o 






O 




o 




o 


O 








o o 








Bj o cn 






o 




o 




o 




o 






























• • 








& 00 <N 






o 




o 




o 




o 






o 






O 




o 




o 


o 








o o 








J3 CO rH 






o 




o 




m 




o 






o 






O 




o 




o 


o 








o o 








be 


- 


» 






•> 




•> 




~ 




•» 






o 






O 




o 




o 


o 








o o 








•h m m 






o 




oq 




CM 




■* 






































K 




in 






CM 




rH 












P 
C 


o 
m 




P 

c 


O 
O 




t> 

CM 




r-\ 


o 








o o 

t 00 
































■o 




03 


o 




03 


O 








>> CO 


rH 








O) O 








p 














p 
c 








03 





rH 

a 


rH 




rH 

a 


H 








P r-i 

Sh 




c 

•H 




cZl 










T3 























OS 

























ti 














•H 














CJ 












P 






P 










X! X! 




s 




u 




CO 






< 








o 




t> 




C^ 




00 P c 


C 




rH 


c 




CO 




CO 


O U 


m 






■H 


CD 














CD 




CD 


>>CO 




CO =H 


c- 







t> 







p> 




t> 


Q CO 


i> 


rH CI 





CO O 


tr 1 

w 

CO 
CO 

< 






>i 






■O OS -<! Ol P C55 


3 


en 


o a 


s 




CT5 


S 




C75 




OS 


1 


OJ 





t> 


> 


c oj co 






P 









r-t 


o 


H 





rH 


O r-i 


u 


rH 


p 




rH 


p 




rH 




rH 


CO c 


rH 


P 


C5 


rH 


•HH cj 






C 






N 




o 




<H 




•H 









03 






03 






X 




C 




03 


rH 





oj X. 




to 


3 






•H 


* 


u 




03 


«. 


p 




c 









VI 







VI 


u 


•^ 


O 


Vk 


3= 




CO 


s ~o 







O 






rH 00 


CQ <! '/) . : 


a co 


OS 


CO 


rH 




CD 


rH 




CM 


3 m 


•H X! 


«* 




^ 





t> u 






P CJ 






O r}H 




t> 




rH 


> r-i 


CQ CM 


Eh 




CO 


Eh 




H 


u 


rH 


P CO 


rH 


• 


00 


OS 


U •# 3 

a 






cS 








X! 




to 




y 




H 




1 
















Eh 




03 S 




-P 










C4 TS 






P 





rH 





■H 











u 





u 







H 












> a 





CO 





rH 


p 








c 




>> 


3 


H 





rH 


rH 


rH 


CO 


rH 


rH 







rH 







rH 


r-\ 


X! 


rH 




rH 





OS r-i TJ 






u 


03 


P 


< 


u 


he y 


X! 


u 


c 


u 


> 





p 







P 







rH 


y 


3 CO 


y 


S 


u 


P 


> y s 











p 


3 




■H 


o 


•H 


3 


•H 


o 


•H 


0) 


•H 


OS 




■H 


OS 




•H 


•H 


•H 





•H 


rH 


•H 


03 


■r-i d 




u 


5 





03 


3 


to 


P 


OS P !- ! : 


P 


CJ 


p 


CO 


P 


£s 




P 


5E 




P 


Ph 


p 


OS o3 


P 


w 


P> 


Ss 


P rH 










P 


+J 


O 


a 


rH 




rH 




u 




rH 




rH 






rH 






H 




rH 




H 




U 




H 




S CO 


OS CO CJ 


a < 




< 




< 




< 




< 






< 






< 




< 




< 




< 




< 









p 






o 


















































CO 




GO 






J 

















































157 



o 
o 



m 
co 



m 



co 
oo 
o 

CO 





05 


CO 
CO 


• 


• 


• 


CN 
05 


rH 

o 

CO 


05 
CO 


9* 


m 




co 

CO 

o> 


00 
CO 
CN 


o 

iH 
CO 




CN 


00 
CN 



w 
> 

w 

H 
Ctf 

Q 
W 

w 



I— I 
QQ 





CO 






t^ 






05 






rH 


^N 




„ 


p 




o 


g 




CO 


o 


C4 




o 


w 


w 


^^ 


> 


55 




o 


D 


K) 


Q 


►"3 


H 


!5 




55 


< 


1 


O 


En 


E-i 


O 


O 


H 


o 




W 


<! 


g 




i-a 


o 




<c 


H 


w 


C4 




o 


H 




55 


55 




3 


o 




< 






CO 





a 

P 

G 

03 

>> 
P 

Sh 


a 
o 



G 

o 




> 



CO 


S 

P 

CO 

CO 

iH 




CO 




P 

o 




o 
c_> 



p 

G 
3 


> 

U 


CO 

tf 



3 
G 

> 




CO 

o 



05 00 CN iH 05 t> 

xoiNOom 



CO 


"* 00 O rH CO H 


CO 


05 05 "^ CO O 00 


oo 


CN Irt iH 05 lO LO 



r-l 



rH CN CN CO O 00 

co cn m rH m 

CO rH CO 



c3 

CO 

G rH 

O O 

■H -H 

CO X! 

CO 

> 
CO 

CO U 

Dh p 

o 



CO 
>> 
OS 
5s 

xi 

b£ 
•H 

a 

o 

p 



u 

O d 
Q<P 73 

a d -h 



COQS:<;w 





3 
G 

> 


OS 

CO 

3 

rH 

a 
u 

3 
CO 



7* 

00 

oo 

CN 

m 



00 



CD 
CD 

05 
CO 
l> 

<=T 

rH 
CD 

00 
CN 









CN 


00 o 






















oo 


O 00 




o oc 




to m o Cj oi 










• 


• • 




CO 


t> 




rH 


CO l> o t> 










00 


tf r> 




• 


• 




• 


• • • • 












05 CO 




CO 


t> 




CO CO CO rH rH 












05 




rH 


00 




f> CO rH Tj< TP 
















CO 


r-l 




CN 


t» oo oo 






G 
















rH 








■5 












CO 












03 




•3 








G 












fn 




CO rH 








o 












TJ 













•H 












^ 




X -H 








P 










co 







0$ X! 









U 


rH 








H 


> 




H CO 


o 






OS 


03 




r-l 




H 


O 






G 






CO 


G 




o 




co 






be 


a 






c 


O 




u 




CO 


•3 




G 3 


CO Si 


bJD 




03 


■H 




p 




< 


G 




•H rH 


3 







u 


P 




G 






oS 




tj oa 


CO Q 




H 


03 




O 05 O rH 










rH 


>> G 













O CD t> l> 






CO 




O 1 


O M 


CO 




XI 


U 




35 05 Oi 











x: 


rH 


- 




c 


O 




C rH rH rH 






P 




X! CO 


ft(Di! 


CO 


3 










r> 




OS 




P CO 


S <H 


u 


0) fa OS 


CO 


•H >, >, >» 


r> 




S 


CO 


•H O W -H 





CO 






OS P OS OS oS 


05 




•H 


P 


& u 


hJ 


rH 


G 


P 








3 rH rH rH 


rH 




P 


G 


o < 


CJ 





CO 


P 


u 


rH U U U 






CO 


3 





h a 







3 


OS < rH 










O P W 3 


c 


•H 


£ 


P 




O > > > 


3 




Si 


O 


OS 3 O O 


5 -" 


CO 




a O O O 


G 







O 


P rH 


Fh 


o 

















73 < CO CO 


O E- 












> 




G 

























£> 




















OS 



158 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded and 

Fixed Debt 13,713,700.00 Article 1, 1975-South School 40,000.00 

Article 24, 1961-Sanborn School 55,000.00 
Article 1, 1963-Sewer APW 46G 320,000.00 
Article 8, 1964-High School 1,755,000.00 
Article 6, 1965-Fish Brook 360,000.00 
Article 11, 1965-Municipal 

Buildings 495,000.00 

Article 1, 1967-Bancrof t 

School 1,040,000.00 

Article 1, 1966 and Article 3, 

1967-High School 500,000.00 

Article 13, 1967-Water 

System Projects 360,000.00 

Article 16, 1967-Municipal 

Buildings 330,000.00 

Article 8B, 1968 and Article 17, 

1968-West and Bancroft 

Schools 1,445,000.00 

Article 10, 1967-Land 

Acquisition 135,000.00 

Article 15, 1968-East Junior 

High Remodeling 80,000.00 

Article 4C 1967-Street 

Construction 60,000.00 

Article 4A, 1967 and Article 32, 

1968-Water Projects 100,000.00 

Article 4B, 1967 and Article 16, 

1968-Sewer Projects 325,000.00 

Article 19A and 3B, 1969- 

Sewer Project Lowell & 

Summer Streets 100,000.00 

Article 5, 1968 and Article 2B, 

1969-Water Project 

Lowell Street 80,000.00 

Article 14, 1969-Municipal 

Buildings 50,000.00 

Article 26, 1970-Water 

Treatment Plant 2,150,000.00 

Article 15, 1970-School Sites 70,000.00 
Article 15, 1973-Shawsheen & 

Doherty School Renovations 785,000.00 
Article 1A, 1974 Fiscal 

Cycle Loan 165,000.00 

Article 26, 1970 Water 

Treatment Plant 50,000.00 

Article 17, 1973 Sewer 

West Andover 135,000.00 

Article 48, 1974 Land 

Acquisition 240,000.00 

Article 17, 1973-Sewer 

West Andover 2,320,000.00 

Article 10A, 1975-Plans 

Water Distribution 168,700.00 

13,713,700.00 13,713,700.00 



159 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due $ 164,006.48 



Apportioned Water Assessments 

Not Due 38,186.39 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 

9,653.03 

Suspended Water Assessments 

2,341.66 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1976 
to 1995 inclusive $ 164,006.48 

Apportioned Water Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1976 
to 1995 inclusive 38,186.39 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Revenue 9,653.03 



Suspended Water Assessments 



2,341.66 



$ 214,187.56 



$ 214,187.56 



160 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
December 31, 1975 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1975 

Receipts: 

Payroll Deductions 

Make-up Payments 

Transfers from Other Systems 

Pension Reimbursements from Other 

Systems 
Transfers from Savings Accounts 
Appr opr ia t ions 
Investment Income 
Profit on Sale of Investments 
Sale of Investments 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 



$ 14,109.61 



$ 191,051.10 

1,189.21 

810.10 

5,170.31 

60,000.00 

313,259.00 

112,273.59 

4.58 

125,786.05 

4,193.37 



813,737.31 



Disbursements : 

Administrative Expense: 

Salaries 

Other Expenses 
Refunds of Accumulated Deductions 
Annuities Paid 
Pensions Paid 
Interest on Refunds 
Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 
Pension Reimbursements to Other 

Systems 
Transfers to Savings Accounts 
Transfer of Accounts to Other 

Systems 
Option b Refunds 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1975 



5,636.36 

432.06 

60,681.33 

35,617.36 

334,671.39 

1,853.19 

300,940.85 

6,363.06 

2,059.04 
70,000.00 

1,121.96 
11,263.45 



830,640.05 
$ - 2,793.13 



161 






CO 

eg 



m 



CO 



CN 

CO 



CO 
05 



C5 


CM 


n< 


tN 


m 


CO 


05 


co 


CO 


H 


t^ 


"<* 


CO 


xf 


CN 


CO 


X 


m 


CN 


O 


"* 


05 


o 




H 


lO 


CO 


CO 







05 

m 

CN 

x 

o 
co 



CN 



«o- 



H 
Eh 
CO 

CO 



Eh 



h-l 

Eh 

W 



Eh 

£3 

CO 

M 
PS 

Eh 



05 
W 
> 

o 

Q 



m 

P 05 
i-l 


CO rH 
CO 

(1) U 
O CD 

a a 

r-\ 

«S o 

CQ 

Q 











>> 












u 




CO 








ci 




w 








-p 




M 








•H 




Eh 


T3 


-a 




rH 




hH 


B 


c 




•rl 




rH 


£ 


3 




S 




CO 








Sh -P 




< 


CO 







O -H 




IH 


bfl 


> 




tp, -a 




J 


C 


Ih 











•H 





T3 


T3 Sh 


-d 




> 


CO 


C 


CJ CJ 


S3 




crj 
CO 




C4 


3 


S 
CJ 


£ 




>> 


>> 


C 


rH -H 







p 


+3 





«J > 


CO 




•H 


•H 


•H 


•H ^ 


s 




3 


3 


CO 


O 







a 


G 


C 


CO 


Q< 




c 


fl 


£ 


a 


Ik! 




< 


<C 


CO 


W 



co 



co 

C5 

t> 

CN 



€0- 



; 



m 


CO 


in 


H 


t> 


CO 


O 


m 


05 


CD 


rH 


H 


CO 


t> 


CO 


o 


o 


m 


CO 


CO 


in 


o 


05 


05 


H 


05 


Tt< 


05 


05 


•* 


CM 


05 


CO 


o 


co 


CM 


CO 


rH 


05 


m 


CO 


CO 


rH 


co 


CO 


■<1< 


r> 


CO 


t* 


co 


05 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


Tf 


■* 


•* 


05 


H 


O 


CN 


CD 


t> 


H 


CO 


m 


H 


lH 






r-{ 



CN 























CO 






















T3 






















c 














CO 








o 














•o 








m 














a 










CO 












o 








c 


Eh 






co 






CQ 


CO 






o 


W 






13 




CO 




TJ 








CO 






a 


CO 


TJ 


>> 


C 






p 


CO 









73 


C 


■P 


O 




CQ 


CQ 


< 






CQ 


S3 





•H 


CQ 




X 













O 


CQ 


rH 




CO 


a 


rH 








P 


CQ 




■rl 


rH 


,* 


a 









• • 


S 







-P 


rt 


o 


CQ 


•P 






CQ 





T3 


C 


& 


•H 







C 









s 


CS 


o 




rH 


p 


CO 


r-l 






•H 


s 


O 


si 


o 


+-> 


CO 


be 








P 


u 


U 


a 


•H 


CO 




a 


TJ 






•H 





rH 





rH 


3 


X 


•H 









u 


> 


•H 


rH 


X> 


•o 


a 


> 


3 




si 

CO 


3 


8 


OS 




Eh 


£ 




crj 
CQ 


CO 


rH 

o 




d 



















o 




U 


CO 
















< 



162 



a 




















+j 


05 


t* 


Tt< 


05 


t* 


00 


05 


<* 


t> 





•* 


cm 


M 


m 


CD 


m 


in 




■* 


H 








■H 










■* 



a 

•h m 
si t» 
to\ 

U iH 
CD CO 

a cm 

CD i-l 

s 



Ed 



m 

CM 



CM 



CO 
CM 



CO 
CM 



05 
O 



CM 



CM 



m 

05 



o 


m 


CO 


05 


CO 


CM 


in 


co 


^ 


m 




m 

CM 







CO 










■p 




Ph 






c 










0) 










a 










d) 






s 




h 






w 


CO 


•H 






H 


« 


■p 






03 


Ph 


0) 






!h 


03 


« 




s 


CO 


S 








Eh 


s 








^ 










Ph 


Ph 








S 


> 








w 


M 








« 


H 






to 


IH 


O 


(0 




h 


H 


< 


•o 




CD Ph 


w 




s 


TJ «H 


« 


1 


3 


C 


to 






«H 


C3 


C 


>H 


>H 


(1) 




ca 


g 




« 




£ s 


H 


> 








& 


»H 








ca 


H 








M 


O 








g 


< 


to 






5 


A 


u 




Ph 


o 


n 


0) ng 




o 


a 


43 


0) 






CO 


a 


iH 




OS 


« 


CD iH 




w 


H 


S 







> 


03 




*H 




o 


S 


£ 


fi 




Q 


W 


CD 


0) 




55 


s 


53 




s 


< 











CN 



CO CO 



CO 



CO CM 



CM CO CN i-H 



co i* "<f 



CN 



CM 



m ^ 



05 



CO 
CM 



o 

CN 



in 

05 



a 

•H rj< 
si t> 
to\ 

CD CO 

acN 

CD iH 

s 



m 

CN 



CO 
CN 



05 



CN CN 



CO 



<tf 


m 


rH 


00 


co 


in 


05 


CO 


H 


CM 






"<* 


CD 


<* 


m 


>> 
-P 
•H 
Sh 
O 


in 

CM 


CO 








to 






si 




CD 








X 






■p 




o 




CO 




u 






3 




•rl 




ca 




O 






< 




«H 




•H 




^ 










«H 


>> 


u 










bo 




o 


u 


CD 


iH 


o 


CD 




C 






ca 


-t-> 





•H 


O 




•H 




C 


h 


CD 


o 


rH 


•H 


CD 


CO 




» 


.Q 


«H 


£ 


Si 


iH 


U 


3 




o 


•H 


ca 


u 


3 


fi 


•H 


O 




Eh 


►H 


CJ 


CO 


Ph 


Ph 


W 





163 



Ph 



CO Oi 



CM 



CO 



o 

CO 



co 



CM 



lO 



eg 



m 



m 

in 







si 






■p 






CO 






s 


s 






H 


w 




Eh 


OS 




03 


w 




>h 


03 




ra 






Eh 


s 


CO 


S5 




•p 


w 


Q 


s 


s 


« 





H 


OS 


e 


PS 


M 


<D 


l-H 


Eh 


U 


H 


w 


•H 


W 


OS 


p 


OS 


, 



03 


>H 






PS 


&M 




o 


Eh 




Eh 


IH 




C= 


> 




PQ 


M 




M 


H 




g 


< 


a 


» 




•H T}< 


o 


ft 


X! t>- 


o 


M 


co\ 




ffi 


U >H 


OS 


CO 


CD CO 


w 


cs 


X)\ 


> 


H 


a <n 


o 


CO 


iH 


a 


S 


S 


& 


w 




< 


s 





Ph cm 



S -H 



CO 



CO 



m cm 



o> 



Ph 



X O 
rH CN 



00 
CM 



CM 



"t 



O 



CM 



CO 



^P 



CM 



CO 

m 



o 
m 



u 



m 















(8 


<H 








CI 


c 


>> 


P 


V 








o 





Si 


G 


g 








•H 


•H 


OS 


(1) 


Ph. 








4-> 


p 


a 


■o 








a 


a 


•H 


•H 










o 
i 


o 
i 


T3 

d 


o 
o 


X! 
P 








a 


a 


, 


, 


2 








•H 


■H 














Xi 


X! 


>> 


>» 


iH 








CO 


CQ 


+> 


p 


03 


< 


CQ 


<j 


u 


h 


•H 


•rl 


p 








o 


O 


iH 


iH 


C 


c 


G 


c 


> 


> 


•H 


•H 


CD 








o 


•H 


•H 


XI 


XI 


T> 


•H 


•H 


•H 


> 


> 


03 


cj 


•H 


•P 


P 


+-> 


u 


?H 


CO 


CO 


O 


a 


a 


a 


3 


3 


•H 


•H 


O 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


W 


Q 


Q 


< 



164 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 



ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Milton Greenberg, Chairman - 1977 
Alan F. French, Vice-Chairman - 1978 
Janet D. Lake, Secretary - 1977 
Richard J. Bowen - 1979 
Susan T. Poore - 1979 

TOWN MODERATOR 

William J. Dalton - 1977 

TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 

Charles F. Dalton, Chairman - 1977 
Fred W. Doyle - 1978 
John M. Murray - 1978 

TRUSTEES. PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Arthur W. Cole - 1979 
Fred W. Doyle - 1979 
William V. Emmons - 1979 
Malcolm J. Ruhl - 1979* 
Harry Se liars - 1979 
Rev. J. Everett Bodge 
Rev. Otis Maxfield 
Rev. J. Edison Pike 

♦Resigned, Summer, 1976 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

George E. Olesen, Jr., Chairman - 1977 
Francis E. Griggs, Jr. - 1977 
Elaine F. Viehmann - 1978 
David R. Ahouse - 1979 
Joseph A. Finn - 1979 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Thomas P. Eldred, Chairman - 1981 

Richard A. Savrann - 1976* 

John B. White, Jr. - 1980 

Winston A. Blake - 1978 

Thomas R. Wallace - 1979 

♦Appointed by Commissioner of Depart- 
ment of Community Affairs (State) 
to June, 1976 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

James A. Booth, Andover - 1979 

John P. Ford, Lawrence 

Patrick McCarthy, Lawrence 

Joseph F. Sweeney, Lawrence 

Terrence Breen, Methuen 

John W. Regan, Methuen 

John J. Caffrey, III, North Andover 



APPOINTIVE 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr., Chairman - 1979 

Donn B. Byrne - 1977 

Paul C. Dow, Jr. - 1977 

Me Ivy n Miller - 1977 

Virginia H. Cole - 1978 

Dana R. Duxbury - 1978 

Leo F. Griffin - 1978 

James B. Watt - 1979 

Robert S. Zollner - 1979 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Archibald D. Maclaren, Chairman 
Phillips B. Marsden, Jr. 
William H. Russell 

BOARD OF RETIREMENT 

David L. Nicoll, Chairman 

Leo F. Daley 

Wendell A. Mattheson, Secretary 

TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
Frederick S. Allis, Chairman 
Robert G. Butler 
Dr. Ernest F. Costello 
Edward I. Erickson (Emeritus) 
Marta B. Hornidge 
John W. Kimball 
Cornelia W. LeMaitre 

Richard C. MacGowan 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Albert F. Cullen, Jr., Chairman 
Robert P. Domingue 
Jane E. Griswold 

Associate members: 
Grover H. Nix 
Willard M. Walsh 
Wesley E. Whitney 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 

Dr. William R. O'Reilly 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

Benjamin Brown (American Legion) 

Joseph L. Monan (V.F.W.) 

John J. Lewis (Veterans' Service Agent) 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Dr. Lawrence Spiegel, Chairman 

James L. Abrahamson 

John Dilorio 

Cleveland Gilcreast 

S. Joseph Hoffman 

Dorothy Sherrerd 

Lawrence J. Sullivan 

Dr. Thomas Swift 
Susan C. Tucker 
George Ziady 



165 



TOWLE FUND TRUST 

Robert A. Watters, Chairman 
Irene H. McCarthy 
Philip F. Sullivan 

PLANNING BOARD 

David M. Erickson, Chairman 
Margaret R. Keck 
Donald J. Mulvey 
G. Warren Patterson 
Stanley Saba 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Virginia H. Hammond, Chairman 
Albert I. Alexander, III* 
Stephen R. Duly 
Robert M. Henderson 
Dr. Edward M. Lenoe 
Robert A. Pustell 
Dr. Richard T. Secord 
* Resigned 9/76 

AMBULANCE STUDY COMMITTEE 

Louise B. Stupack, Chairman 

William L. Lane 

William D. Martin 

Dr. William R. O'Reilly 

Dean K. Webster 

Dr. Harry S. Westcott 

Christine H. Young 

Lt. Raymond Collins, Police Dept 

Deputy Chief William Downs, Fire Dept. 

RECREATION/COMMUNITY SCHOOLS COMMITTEE 

James A. Flynn, Chairman 
Thomas F. Comparato 
Willis E. Gray, Jr. 
Richard Marciano 
Douglas F. Mitchell 
Robert R. Radula 
Charles C. Rancourt 
Patricia C. Saalfrank 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Philip K. Allen, Co-Chairman 
Philip A. Dargie, Co-Chairman 
Stanley Butcher 
Norma A. Gammon 
Edward M. Harris 
Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 
Margaret H. Thompson 

TOWN MEETING STUDY COMMITTEE 



Frederick P. Fitzgerald, 
James D. Doherty 
Lucretia Lyons 
Norman P. Merrill 
Forrest H . Noyes , Jr . 
Francis P. Reilly 
Gerald M. Silverman 
Car*ol Weinstein 



Chairman 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Thomas P. Brennan 
Harry Sellars 
Eugene A. Zalla 
Elden R. Salter 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 

Police Chief David L. Nicoll 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Town Manager J. Maynard Austin 

Donald Mulvey 

Francis C. Emmons, Jr. 

Francis J. Trombly 

G. Warren Patterson (Alternate) 

SACRED HEART PROPERTY STUDY COMMITTEE 

Austin E. Anderson, Chairman 
Robert G. Butler 
Ralph S. Crossan 
Ruth H. Dunbar 
Willis E. Gray, Jr. 
Francis E. Griggs, Jr. 
George E. Heseltine 
Elinor M. Ristuccia 
Stanley Saba, Jr. 
Frederic S. Stott 

BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

Norma A. Gammon, Chairman 
Virginia H. Cole 
Francis A. Demers 
Joan M. Dill 
Geroge W. Glennie 
Edward M. Harris 
William E. Hart 
Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 
Dorothy S. Hill 
Barbara G. Lampe 
John D. Lewis 
James W. McLeod 
Gary C. Ralph 
Barbara T. Saulnier 
Dorothy M. Sherrerd 
Helen M. Watkinson 
Sidney P. White 

RECYCLING ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Margaret Pustell, Chairman 

Pat Aiello 

Gail Anderson 

Helen Anderson 

Kris Campion 

Virginia Cole 

Sue Dennett 

Alex Driscoll 

Tina Gerdwood 

Maureen Gerstberger 

Elaine Katz 

Jackie Kovacs 

Fran McCormack 

Jan Miller 

Pam Mitchell 
Loli Sumberg 
Adeline Wright 

166 






COUNCIL ON AGING 

James A. Booth, Chairman 

Leslie S. Bartow 

James Caldwell 

Florence McGrath 

Eleanor McNamara 

Pamela H. Mitchell 

Edith St. Jean 

Donald P. Scott 

Gary C. Ralph, Ex Officio 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 

John D. Lewis, Chairman 
James Flynn 
William Martin 
James McLeod 
Robert E. McQuade 
Gary C. Ralph 
Francis P. Reilly 
John Obert 
Ronald Tetreault 

HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Frank A. Demers, Chairman 
J. Radford Abbot 
Beverly M. Darling 
Elizabeth A. Fields 
William P. Foster 
Donald P. Hayes, Jr. 
G. Warren Patterson 

BIKEWAYS COMMITTEE 
Richard E. Chapell 
Margaret R_ Keck 
Audrey R. Kenney 
E. Mark Klempa, Jr. 
H. Barbara Ly brand 
John M. McCoy 



BALLARD VALE COMMUNITY CENTER STUDY COMM , 

Francis J. Byrne, Chairman 

Joan P. Abramson 

Mildred Davison 

Russell G. Doyle 

Ernest N. Hall 

Rev. David A. Hollenbeck 

Richard H. Mower 

Linda M. Smith 

Thomas W. Sutton, Jr. 

RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE ADVISORY COMM . 

Margaret R. Keck, Chairman 
Virginia H. Hammond 
Douglas Mitchell 
Gary C. Ralph 
Sheldon S„ Cohen 

TRUSTEES, SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Charles A. Bergeron 
Gilbert J. Cromie 
Leo F. Daley 
Irving J. Whitcomb 

TRANSPORTATION POLICY ADVISORY GROUP 
Sheldon S. Cohen 

MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 

J. Maynard Austin 

Donald J. Mulvey, Alternate 

IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT 
John Avery 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 
Robert E. McQuade (To 1/14/80) 



LOCAL GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 

Milton Greenberg* 
Alan F. French* 
Janet D. Lake* 
Richard J. Bowen* 
Susan T. Poore* 
David M. Erickson 
Mrs. Virginia H. Hammond 
Thomas P. Eldred 
Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Philip K. Allen/Philip A. Dargie 
George F. Olesen 
Robert Finlayson 
Susan B. Dennett/Gail Anderson 
Mary C. Hamilton 
J. Maynard Austin 
Sheldon S. Cohen 
* Voting Member 



167 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 

Edward W. Brooke, 535 Beacon Street, Boston 
Edward M. Kennedy, 1702 P.O. Bldg., Boston 

SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 1, 2, 3, 4 
William X. Wall, 179 Spruce Street, Lawrence 

FIRST ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 5, 6 
William L. Saltonstall, 388 Summer Street, Manchester 

TWENTY-SEVENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Gerald M. Cohen, 5 William Street, Andover 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
Paul Tsongas, Rm. 513, 477 Essex Street, Lawrence 

FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 
Thomas J. Lane, 92 Abbot Street, Lawrence 



168 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1976 



Animal Inspector „ , 

Assessor ..... ■ 

Civil Defense Director ..... 

Collector-Treasurer. ...... 

Director, Memorial Hall Library. 
Director of Public Health. . . , 
Director of Public Works .... 

Dog Officer. .......... 

Fire Chief ........... 

Forestry Superintendent. .... 

Game Warden. .......... 

Deputy Game Warden ........ 

n m it 

Gas Inspector. ......... 

General Construction Inspector , 
Highway Superintendent ......... 

Housing Authority Executive Director . « 
Inspector of Buildings ......... 

Ass't. Inspector of Buildings. . . . . 
Inspector of Wires ........... 

Ass't. Inspector of Wires. ...... 

Police Chief .............. 

Police Legal Adviser . . . 

Recreation/Community Schools Director. , 
Sanitary & Plumbing Inspector. . . . . , 

Ass't. Sanitary 8s Plumbing Inspector , 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Superintendent of Schools. ....... 

Ass't. Superintendent of Schools . . , 
Superintendent of Spring Grove Cemetery, 
Town Accountant ............. 

Town Clerk ...... 

Ass't. Town Clerk. . 
Town Counsel ..... 

Ass't. Town Counsel. 
Town Engineer. .... 
Town Manager ..... 

Ass ' t . Town Manager . 
Town Constables. . . . 

Veterans ' Service Agent .... 
Water and Sewer Superintendent 



Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

William H. Russell 

James F. Johnson 

Myron H. Muise 

Nancy C. Jacobs on 

Neal D. McDowell 

Robert E. McQuade 

Donald V. Porter 

Henry L. Hilton 

James L. Bamford 

Forrest H. Noyes , Jr. 

James V. Deyermond 

Eugene A. Zalla, Jr. 

Walter R. Vogt 

James J. Rand, Jr. 

John M. Lynch 

Thomas P. Walsh 

Arthur Peatman 

Sam J. DeSalvo 

Donald J. Ward 

Gilbert DeMoor 

David L. Nicoll 

John J. Willis, Jr. 

Gary C. Ralph 

Walter R. Vogt 

Harold A. Rutter, Jr. 

Newton A. Jones 

Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert 

Dr. Harry S. Westcott 

Stephan J. Bamford 

Wendell A. Mattheson 

Elden R. Salter 

Olga Palenski 

Alfred L. Daniels 

Fredric S. O'Brien 

John Avery 

J. Maynard Austin 

Sheldon S. Cohen 

Benjamin C. Brown and Thomas 

P. Eldred 

John J. Lewis 

Ernest J. Cote 



169 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection 56 

Assessors 21 

Assistant Town Manager 16 

AVIS 52 

Bicentennial Committee 51 

Bikeways Committee 40 

Board of Appeals 38 

Board of Health 57 

Board of Selectmen 5 

Building Inspection 35 

CETA Program 26 

Civil Defense 31 

Collect or -Treasurer 19 

Conservation Commission 45 

Council on Aging 47 

Development and Industrial Commission. 39 

Directory of Department Heads 169 

Directory of Town Officials 165 

Dog Officer 33 

Electrical Inspection 34 

Engineering 65 

Financial Statements 129 

Fire Department 28 

Forestry 71 

Fourth of July Celebration 55 

Game Warden 32 



Greater Lawrence Mental Health 
Center , 



Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc 



63 



62 



Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 

Technical High School 74 

Greater Lawrence Sanitary District... 64 

Highways 68 

Historical Commission 54 

Housing Authority 41 

Inspection Services 34 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 19 

Jury List 84 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 18 

Memorial Hall Library 49 

North East Solid Waste Committee 64 

Parks 70 

Planning Board 37 

Police Department 29 

Recreation/Community Schools 43 

Sale of Property 56 

Sewers 68 

Solid Waste 72 

Spring Grove Cemetery 72 

Town Clerk 17 

Town Counsel 27 

Town Manager 8 

Town Meeting Minutes 92 

Traffic Committee 54 

Trustees Punchard Free School 83 

Veterans ' Services 53 

Water Department 66 

Weights and Measures 39 






£••' * & 



& 



'gfi -A* 




Annual 
Report 
for tlie 

Town of 
Andover 



1977 



(January 1 , 1977 through 

December 31, 1977) 

prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 

Chapter 40, Section 49 

of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

and Article II, Section Four 

of the By-Laws of the 

Town of Andover 




Board of Selectmen 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
March 8, 1978 01810 



Fellow Citizens of Andover : 

This has been a tumultuous year for your Board of Selectmen. We 
have been faced with the unusual situation of the resignation of 
two selectmen before the expiration of their terms of office. The 
occurrence of one of these resignations, that of Mr. Alan F. French 
early in the year made it necessary for the Board to choose and 
appoint to the vacancy a member to fill the balance of the unex- 
pired term as authorized by the Town Charter. The other resigna- 
tion, that of Mr. Richard J. Bowen, although not occurring until 
calendar year 1978, was expected early in December. However, the 
relatively short period of his term remaining until the March 
elections decided the Board against the appointment of an interim 
member to fill his prospective vacancy. 

In between these changes in the composition of the Board of Select- 
men, the resignation of the then Acting Town Manager, Mr. J. Maynard 
Austin was received in late October. With this development the res- 
ponsibility devolved on the Board, under the terms of the Town 
Charter, to appoint an interim Acting Town Manager while a search 
was undertaken for a successor to Mr. Austin. As interim Acting 
Town Manager, the Board appointed Mr. Sheldon S. Cohen, who had 
been Assistant Town Manager under Mr. Austin. Acting as a search 
committee, the Selectmen set about choosing a new Town Manager 
from among 102 candidates applying for the position. Although 
the number of candidates had been materially narrowed by the end 
of the year, a final decision was not reached until well into 1978. 
Although not strictly a part of this report, it seems appropriate 
to record that Mr. Jared S.A. Clark, City Manager of Dover, New 
Hampshire, was chosen by the Selectmen and is expected to take 
office before April, 1978. 

While much of the Selectmen's time was devoted to the foregoing 
matters, other problems of equal or even greater importance fell 
to their lot for consideration during the year. Some of these 
were resolved, either by the Selectmen themselves or by the two 
Town Meetings held in the course of the year. A solution for the 
most troublesome problem has not, however, been found by either 
body, nor does it appear possible that a complete solution can be 
found at the municipal level. 



It is the purpose of the Board of Selectmen to exert its best 
efforts to hold the line on local taxes in the face of constantly 
increasing costs. However, recognizing the continuing deteriora- 
tion of the value of the U.S. dollar brought about by decisions 
at the Federal level, the Board's objective cannot be fully met 
if existing services are to be continued, let alone any expansion 
of those services. In view of an annual inflation rate of 6-7%, 
it is obvious that revenue sources must increase just to maintain 
services at the same level. 

The major source of municipal income remains the tax on real property 
which hits the property owner directly and those who rent or lease 
indirectly. In order to lessen the impact of those taxes on the 
homeowner, Selectmen through the Town Manager, the Planning Board 
and the Industrial Development Commission are continually on the 
lookout for attractive businesses willing to establish themselves 
in Andover and some success has been attained in this area with 
more anticipated in the near future. 

There are many other matters which the Board of Selectmen has taken 
under consideration during the year which you will find reported 
in some detail in the first section of the report. In summary, 
we feel that the Town of Andover is in good financial condition 
and that its management will continue to meet the needs of its 
citizens to the best of its ability within whatever resources 
may be made available to it by the Town. 

In closing, the Board would like to express its profound gratitude 
to the many citizens who have dedicated their services to the Town 
by service on boards, commissions and committees without which 
the Town could not function. We would urge all who having knowledge 
useful in the government of the Town or motivated to be of public 
service, to inscribe their names in our newly opened Talent Bank. 



^k&4 



CLU- > • V«miA.C hairman 

£7"Vice-Chairman 




CjfcgXftjL /*! .yfS&H** S»cret 



ary 




l ^^n^ 



Selectman 



Board of Selectmen 

In the period January 1, 1977 through December 31, 1977, the Board of Selectmen 
held 23 regular meetings, 60 special meetings and 19 conference sessions. Several 
of the last two categories were joint meetings with the School and Finance Committees 
and other town boards and committees. 

At the organizational meeting of April 4, 1977, following the election of 
Albert Cole, Jr., and Edward M. Harris to the Board, the following officers were 
elected by the Board: 

Susan T. Poore, Chairman; Albert Cole, Jr., Vice-Chairman; Edward M. Harris, 
Secretary. Members remaining from the previous Board were Alan F. French and 
Richard J. Bowen. 

Selectman Alan F. French resigned from the Board effective April 5, 1977, 
creating a vacancy which the Board had authority to fill by appointment pending the 
1978 elections. 

At a regular meeting on June 13, 1977, the Board unanimously elected Philip J. 
Salamone from among the candidates who had presented themselves to the Board to fill 
the vacancy created by the resignation of Selectman French. 

In consideration of the expiration on September 2, 1977, of the three-year 
term of J. Maynard Austin as Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen issued on 
January 24, 1977, a statement that Mr. Austin's contract would not be renewed. 
However, at a regular meeting on April 25, 1977, the new Board of Selectmen issued 
a statement of its goals and objectives in which it also announced its intention to 
extend Town Manager Austin's tenure for an additional two years to complete the five- 
year term called for by the Town Charter. 

Having reviewed the legal complications of this proposal with a special legal 
counsel during the last week in August, the Board on August 30, 1977, voted to 
appoint Mr. Austin as Acting Town Manager effective September 3, 1977. On 
October 18, 1977, Acting Town Manager Austin submitted his resignation which was 
accepted by the Board with the informal understanding that his services would be 
retained to advise the new Acting Town Manager until on or about February 21, 1978, 
unless a position opened up for him in another town prior to that date. Assistant 
Town Manager Sheldon S. Cohen was then appointed by the Board as Acting Town Manager 
pending the arrival of a new Town Manager for whom a search was to be immediately 
undertaken by the Board. Acting Town Manager Cohen after investigating the legal 
ramifications of the matter, on November 15, 1977, appointed J. Maynard Austin as 
Special Assistant to the Acting Town Manager for a period ending February 21, 1978, 
at which time Mr. Austin's employment by the Town of Andover would cease. 

The Board finalized a bond issue of $1,655,000 to develop the Holt Hill 
Reservoir and certain open space and recreational land acquisitions authorized by 
Article 47 of the 1976 Annual Town Meeting. 

Also in the same month a decision was reached by the Board, after an indepth 
study of the matter, not to submit a proposal for a site in the Town of Andover for 
the Regional Solid Waste Disposal facility. 

In February, the Board urged that a nationwide search be undertaken for the 
first full-time Executive Director of the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District which 
will represent a capital cost of over $50 million and an estimated $3 million per 
year operating cost for the four participating cities and towns. 

The Board reached agreement with the Order of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart 
of New England for acquisition of the playing fields of the former school as well as 
the Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium. 

The application of the Andover Housing Authority for State Aided Housing 
Project 667-4 for the elderly and handicapped was supported by the Selectmen. 

5 



In consultation with the Planning Board, the selectmen developed and approved 
guidelines for the reuse of that part of the former Abbot Academy land planned for 
disposal by the Trustees of Phillips Academy. 

The Board supported the successful efforts of the townspeople to continue the 
operation of the main U.S. Post Office on Main Street and the branches in 
Shawsheen Village and Ballardvale. 

Sitting as Water Commissioners, the Board set new rates for the use of town 
water in order to bring revenues from that source up to 70% of the total expendi- 
tures of the town water division, allowing 30% to be provided by taxation for 
purposes of fire protection. The new rate, effective August 1, 1977, was $.71 
per 100 cubic feet. 

In order to cause revenues from use of the town sanitary sewers to equal all 
costs to the town as a member of the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District, plus the 
operating and maintenance costs of the town's Sewer Division, the Board, sitting 
as Sewer Commissioners, found it necessary to increase the sewer service charge 
from $.30 to $.40 per 100 cubic feet of water used, to become effective as of 
July 1, 1977. 

The Board developed and adopted a formal set of Rules of Order and Procedure, 
the first adopted by the Selectmen of the Town. 

At the suggestion of the League of Women Voters and others, the Board approved 
development of a "Talent Bank", a new method of broadening and encouraging citizen 
participation in town government. 

After considerable indecision, the Board finally voted not to participate in the 
208 Areawide Waste Water Management Program administered by the Merrimack Valley 
Planning Commission. 

The Board developed for the first time a specific job description for the 
position of Town Manager. 

In view of certain operational problems of the Trombly Motor Coach Co. , the 
Board reached agreement with the company to continue to provide bus service to the 
town pending a decision on the matter by the Annual Town Meeting in 1978. 

The Board prepared and submitted to the Special Town Meeting for approval a 
proposal for a memorial to be erected in the town to those who served in the 
military, naval or air service in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. 

Hard upon the resignation of Acting Town Manager J. Maynard Austin, the Board 
undertook a nationwide search for a new town manager. Through advertising and by 
word of mouth, 102 applications were received. Much time was devoted by the Board 
to this important project in narrowing down the list to manageable proportions. The 
search was still underway at the end of the year. 

Much time was also devoted by the Board to problems arising from conflicts 
growing out of the desire of real estate developers to move ahead rapidly and the 
terms of such state legislation as the Wetlands Act and other factors such as the 
limited extent of the present Andover sanitary sewer system. The Board is con- 
tinuing to seek solutions to these problems. 

The Board of Selectmen strongly supported the Board of Assessors in presenting 
to the town meeting a proposal for a "Fair Share" revaluation of the town. Such a 
revaluation is required under state law every ten years. Andover' s last reassess- 
ment was done in 1967. The proposal as presented to the Annual Town Meeting was 
largely misunderstood by the citizens and as a result it was voted down in that 
meeting and again in the Special Town Meeting in the fall. It is apparently the 
fear of many citizens that the revaluation of real property on the 100% basis 
called for by the state law will lead to increased taxes. The selectmen wish to 
point out that taxes are based upon the annual town budget approved by the town 
meeting. The proposed "Fair Share" revaluation should not be seen as increasing 



the budget, but rather as redistributing the tax burden so as to apply it more 
fairly, reducing the share of those who now pay too much, and increasing the share 
of those who pay too little, but leaving some with no relative change in their share 
Believing that a realignment of real property taxes on a fair share basjs is long 
overdue, the Board continues to support this measure. 



Town Manager 



1977 was marked by major initiatives in several areas. As a group, these may 
be expected to have a significant, long-term effect on how the Town of Andover 
conducts the business of a $20-million enterprise. 

Capital Improvement Program 

In reviewing the tools the Town has had for prudent fiscal management and 
planning, two of particular importance have been missing: (1) a long-term capital 
improvement program; and (2) program budgeting. Realizing the magnitude of the 
impact of capital expenditures on the Town's overall fiscal position, it was decided 
that the capital improvement program ought to be launched first. 

The initial year of this work has demonstrated the need for this tool. Although 
the large amounts of dollars may sometimes look awesome, Andover' s capital planning 
guidelines follow our own historical level of effort as well as the advice of 
experts in the field of municipal finance. 

Particular recognition should be given to the School Committee and Superin- 
tendent of Schools for their full cooperation here. 

Computer Services 

Following the policy direction of the Selectmen and School Committee, the 
Andover Computer Advisory Committee was reactivated in July of 1977, following a 
3-year hiatus. 

The Committee has made a major contribution in assisting the Town and School 
Department to evaluate their needs and develop a Request For Proposals for 
Computer Services/Systems. 

Andover is addressing this basic need at a time when the evolution of technology 
and prices in the marketplace should put the Town as a user of services in a 
favorable position. 

Growth & Development 

1977 saw Andover reach a watershed in its approach to coping with pressures of 
growth and development. 

The realization came that the Town did not in fact have the apparatus required 
here. Equally as important, the various departments, boards and committees 
involved in this area joined together in a spirit of cooperation and mutual interest 
to address and resolve these issues. 

Citizen Participation 

During the 1977 elections, it was suggested at a meeting sponsored by the 
Andover League of Women Voters that a renewed effort be made by the Town to broaden 
the opportunity for citizen participation in the Town's various boards, committees 
and commissions. 

Acting on this, a new Andover Talent Bank form was developed and distributed 
as part of the Finance Committee's October, 1977 Report and Warrant For Town Meeting. 

One of the unique features of the Andover Talent Bank is that the form is 
designed for computerization, lending to the ease of locating townspeople of 
different interests and backgrounds for our numerous activities. 

7 



Police Department 

Following the appropriation of funds by the 1976 Annual Town Meeting, Public 
Administration Service, a non-profit public-sector consulting organization, was 
hired to survey the organization and management of the Andover Police Department. 

The Town Manager's Office was particularly pleased by the effective relation- 
ship that developed between the consultant and the personnel of the Police 
Department. This helped greatly in producing several basic, practical recommenda- 
tions for action. 

Recreation/Community Schools 

As this department completed its fifth year, coincidence saw the Director and 
one of the two Program Supervisors depart almost simultaneously for other 
opportunities . 

The Town Manager and Board of Selectmen then asked the Recreation/Community 
Schools Committee to evaluate this Department's past and current role and make 
alternative recommendations for the future. 

The Committee worked with dedication during the summer and fall of 1977 and 
presented the final report in November. 

Action on the Committee's recommendations is now awaited. 

Town Clerk 

In 1975 new precinct lines were drawn for the redistricting of the Town 
and reported in the State Census. Although the new precinct lines were designed 
in 1975, the Statutes required that the old six precinct division be maintained 
through the 1976 State Elections. After the November election this office again 
began the task of reverting back to the eight precinct alignment. At the con- 
clusion of 1977, the total number of registered voters was 14,705 divided among 
the new eight precincts as follows: 



1 — 


1760 


2 — 


1927 


3 — 


2043 


4 — 


1877 



5 — 


1786 


6 -- 


1787 


7 — 


1783 


7 — 


1742 



The increase in new voting precincts meant locating two additional voting places 
and the following locations were approved by the Board of Selectmen, to be in 
effect commencing with the Town Election of 1977: 



Precinct 


One 


Precinct 


Two 


Precinct 


Three 


Precinct 


Four 


Precinct 


Five 


Precinct 


Six 


Precinct 


Seven 


Precinct 


Eight 



Free Church 

Baptist Church 

Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium 

West Elementary School 

St. Robert Bellarmine Church 

Ballardvale United Church 

Peabody House 

Faith Lutheran Church 



Elm Street 
Central Street 
Haverhill Street 
Beacon Street 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Clark Road 
Phillips Street 
South Main Street 



The following Statistical and Financial Reports are for the period from 
January 1, 1977 to December 31, 1977: 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Number of Births Recorded: 216 

Males: 120 Females: 96 

Number of Marriages Recorded: 304 

Number of Deaths Recorded: 163 

Males: 76 Females: 87 

The number of Dog Licenses sold was 2323. The total amount collected was 
$9625.00, all of which was submitted to the Town Treasurer. Of this amount, 
$3188.05 was retained by the Town and the balance sent to the County Treasurer. 

The number of Fishing and Hunting Licenses sole was 771. The total amount coll- 
ected was $6841.30. Of this $212.55 was submitted to the Town Treasurer and 
retained by the Town. The balance was sent to the Division of Fisheries and Game 

Other monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Intentions 816.00 

Certified Copies . 1,680.00 

UCC 1,909.00 

Misc. Licenses 2,407.50 

A. B.C. 22,056.00 

Business Certificates 37.50 

Miscellaneous (storage of 2,832.00 
flammables, street lists 
maps, etc.) 



TOTAL $ 31,738.50 

Total monies collected were $48,204.80. Of this amount $35,139.10 was turned 

over to the Town Treasurer; $6,628.75 was sent to the Division of Fisheries 

and Game, and $6,436.95 was sent to the County Treasurer for Dog Licenses. 



Animal Inspection 



The following is a statistical report of the activities of the Inspector of 
Animals for the calendar year 1977. 

No. of dogs quarantined and examined for signs of Rabies 52 

No . of dogs found to have Rabies 

No . of other animals examined for Rabies 3 

No. of animals found to have Rabies 

No . of barns inspected 55 

No . of horses 157 

No. of Dairy cattle 8 

No. of Beef cattle 21 

No . of Swine 788 

No . of Goats 16 

No . of Sheep 8 



w 




o 


CO 


3 


rx, 


* 


VD 


pq 


i-M 



CO 

w 
rJ 



CO vO 


m 


VD 


o 


o 


00 as 


vO 


r-l 


o 


vO 


LO ON 


OS 


m 


OS 


ON 


<t O 


CM 


oo 


CO 


O 


co co 


rx. 


CO 




CO 












i-l vO 


CO 


CN 




<t 


CO OS 


iH 


I-l 




LO 


CO i-l 


CO 






co 












|x. 

■CO- 








rx. 
■co- 



o 

00 
00 

o 

CM 



CM 

o 


ON CO 
OS CO 


O 


00 

co 


VD 
r-l 

ON 


r-l O 

r-» co 

VO CM 


i-i 

OS 


CM 

co 

|x. 










VD 
CO 


OS 

I-l 




|x- 

o 



o 
co 



VD 
CM 



r-l 


ca 


o 


CO 


CO 


in 


i-i 


o 


m 


CM 


I-M 


vO 


<t 


in 


|x- 


LO 


00 


■-4 


CO 


i-M 


OS 


CO 


eg 


r-i 


r-. 












r-l 


CO 






LO 


l-l 








1-1 

■CO- 



I-l 


LO 


CO 


00 


rx. 


vO 


00 


-ct 


OS 


o 


CO 


«rr 


OS 


I— 1 


CM 


CO 


00 


<r 


i-l 


LO 










I-l 


CO 




CO 






(0 
CO 
0> 



rx. <t o lo 
oo oo vo r-- 

VD <f OS OS 

cm co vo rx 

LO i-l OS 

os rx 

i-i i-i 
■co- 



<t O O i-l 

vD VO CM CO 

rx- -ct O i-i 

<f CO CM O 

LO LO i-l i-l 
CO OS 



O O LO 00 O 

cm I s ". rx. o o 



LO f- LO 00 CM 
LO CM -^ <f LO 
CO to O CM LO 

LO LO <f CO 

vtWOiO 

OS OS CO 
VD 

-co- 



co 

O 

co 

00 



VO vO LO 

00 O 00 

<t N VO 

OS CS| N 

r~- oo 



LO o LO 
CO CM CO 

LO <r o 

I-l CO i-l 

rx.rx.r-i 



VO <t CM CO O 

rx. vo --t rx O 



CN O fx. r-l 

i— I OS VD I s * 

OS O CM CM 

in r^ n in 

o o rx. 

co CM CM 



VD 
-00- 



r-. <t 
oo <r 

co <t 
vo oo 

CO CO 



NN O 

LO OS r-l 

cm rx r-i 

•Vt CO OS 

r-l CO -it 

O CO 
CM 



OO NO OS 
O LO O CO 



O r-l CO LO 
O "~l O LO 
<t 00 r-l CO 

vO 00 
00 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 

<D IN 

3 O 

C OS 

cu cvl 

> -00- 



CU 
Pd 

4-1 
O 

a 
o 

•iH 
4-1 
CO 

Cu 

•rl 
O 



CO 
C -H 
•rl U 

CU 
CO CO 

e 

cd CU 

o c 

tJ o 





T3 




0) 


XI 


CO 


CJ 





B 


T— 1 


a) 


O 


0) 


a) 


T3 


u 


01 


o 


u 


14-1 


CU 


(U 


!-l 


Sm 


CI) 


CU 


3 


3 


CO 


co 


CU 


cu 


I-l 


1-1 


-U 


4-1 


•H 


•rl 


H 


H 


X 


X 


IT) 


id 


H 


H 


4J 


C 


,c. 


CU 


60 


> 


•r-l 


cu 


W 


co 



a 
a> 

o 
O 



O CM O 


CO 


o 


CM 


VD <T O 


CO 


o 


CO 


O r~- VD 


<t 


r-l 


as 


CM r-l tx. 


CM 


Os 


CM 


CO LO OS 


r-. 


LO 


1-1 










CO O 00 


o 




x-r 


OS VD r-l 


CO 




LO 


CO CM VD 






co 










<t r-1 






vD 


r-l 






r-l 


-CO- 






■CO- 



rx. 

o 



<t 
<r 



OS 
OS 



rx. 

VD 

CO 
00 
OS 



PQ 



r- o 


LO 


CO 


O 


o 


o r-- 


CM 


VD 


o 


rx. 


rx. lo 


I-l 


rx. 


LO 


vO 


r-l CM 


00 


r-i 


1-1 


m 


O lo 


LO 


CO 


1-1 


O 












<T OS 


00 


VD 




as 


OS CO 


r-» 






r-i 


CO r-l 


CM 






00 












VD 








vD 


■CO- 








■CO- 



<r 
as 




o 

1-1 


LO 

r-x 


VD 
CO 


o 
xf 
LO 


rx. 

m 

CM 


00 

o 

00 


<r 
<t 

VD 


r-l 

LO 

CN 












1—1 
o 

r-l 


as 

CM 


CO 




lO 

CO 

1-1 
-co- 



as r-i co r-- 

oo os <t co 

VD I s * CM CM 

<r r-- rx. lo 

CO VD os o 

OS CSI <f N 

O r-l OS CN 

os lo r-» vd 

LO -Ct CO -Ct 
CN CM 



LO xt 00 

vo os rx. 

m co <t 

r-l OS CO 

CO CM LO 

00 CN O 



►J 



CU 














cu 








co 














CO 








•rl 


CO 












•rl 


CO 






O 


0) 












u 


0) 






X 


X 












X 


X 






w 


cd 
H 


co 










w 


co 
H 


co 




CU 




4-1 


cu 








CU 




4-1 


cu 


CO r-l 


>s 


a 


(0 






co 


r-l 


>, 


C 


CO 


CU o 


4J 


cu 


•rl 






cu 


o 


-U 


a) 


•1-1 


X ■* 


i-l 


& 


o 






X 


•rl 


u 


e 


U 


co x: 


CU 


CO 


X 






cd 


J= 


cu 


co 


X 


H CU 


a, 


CO 


w 






H 


CU 


a. 


CO 


w 


> 


o 


0) 










> 


o 


cu 




cu 


u 


CO 


1—1 






a) 




u 


CO 


I-l 


■U i-J 


CM 


CO 


cd 




r~ 


4J 


u 


Cm 


CO 


CO 


CO o 




< 


B 




N 


CO 


o 




< 


B 


4-1 4-J 


r-l 




•rl 




*-^. 


4J 


4-1 


r-l 




■r-l 


co O 


CO 


r-l 


C 




VD 


CO 


o 


CO 


1—1 


d 


w S 


o 


CO 
•H 


< 


CO 
r-l 


r-~ 


fd 


S 


o 


CO 
•rl 


< 


I-l [■-. 


CO 


o 


^ 


cd 


>h 


r-l 


vD 


CO 





£ 


cd r-- 


U 


CU 


}-l 


4J 


> 


CO 


r~- 


1-1 


cu 


S-( 


CU OS 


CU 


a. 


CO 


o 


W 


0) 


os 


CU 


a- 


03 


cd r-i 


Cm 


00 


Ph 


H 


rJ 


pi 


r-l 


Cm 


GO 


P^ 






cd 
o 



Cd 
Cm 







CO 














60 










cu 














C 










X 




VD 






r-~ 




•rl 








CU 


cd 




N 






n 


1>- 


rl 








CO 


H co 




-■ — 






^^, 


r-~ 


n) 








•r-l 


4-) 


H 


o 






o 


as 


js 






CO 


o 


>s C 


ai 


CO 






CO 


r-i 


CO 




co 


CU 


X 


4-J CU 


O 


•->^ 






- — 








-a 


X 


w 


r< g 


Pm 


CM 






CN 


Q 


cu 




c 


CO 




CU CO 


w 


r-l 






r-l 


W 


3 




3 


H 


cu 


a- co 


Pd 




>>■ 


CO 




£m" 


C 


CO 


Pm 




I-l 


o CU 




CU 


r^ 


4-J 


a) 


S 


cu 


T3 




cu 


o 


i-J CO 


CO 


O 


as 


C 


o 


-^ 


> 


C 


cu 


4-1 


■rl 


PM CO 


* 


C 


r-i 


CU 


C 


W 


cu 


3 


3 


CO 


-C 


< 


Pi 


cd 




E 


cd 




pi 


Pm 


C 


4J 


QJ 


1-1 


i 


r-i 


CO 


OJ 


i—i 


H 






CU 


CO 


> 


cd r-i 


CO 


4-1 


CO 


co 


CO 


r-i 


cu 


> 


w 




C cd 


p 


pq 


a. 


U 


pq 


W 


CO 


3 


cu 




tJ 


O -rl 


CO 




•rl 


3 




Pi 


I-i 


C 


cd 


r-l 


O 


CO o 


< 


J3 


CU 


x> 


Jl 


w 


CU 


0) 




CO 


4J 


U CU 


w 


co 


CJ 


co 


CO 


H 


T3 


> 


c 


QJ 


o 


cu a. 


cd 


co 


0) 


■rl 


cd 


3 


cu 


0) 


o 


Pi 


S 


Fm CO 


H 


U 


Cri 


Q 


u 


M 


&M 


cd 


3 



10 



CO 

o 

CO 

<0 

0) 
CO 
CO 

< 



o 


«H 




o 


o 




o 






•> 







■* 


CO 




CM 


ai 




o 







•* 


in 




o 







iH 


a 




&■ 


CO 




«H 


3 u 







a a 





0> 


•> >> 




CD 


o 




d 


O 







o > 




u 


-•H 




o 


CN =H 




3 


l> 




■H 


CO -P 

■» CO 




a 


O d 




d 


#3- 




CO 







0) 


CO X! 




-p 


d -p 




d 


£ 







&o 




•H 


>, 3 




73 


-P -rl 




S3 • 


54 5h 




•H CM 


3 




O 


a-c 




O 05 





< 
Eh 
<! 

Q 


O iH 


54 O 


t> 


ao 


~ 


t> 


O 


r4 •> 


CO 3 


d •* 


h- 1 
CO 
CO 

w 

CO 


rH -H 


£3 r4 


•> CO 


O O 


00 


CO « 


-tf O 


5h CM 


CN O 


m- 


«e-i> 


a 


<H CO 


o 


CO 

< 


O CM 


rH 


o 


£2 


> 

<J 
PS 

a 

s 
o 
u 


- 


d co 


3 <N 


K d 


rH Tt* 


d 


d 39- 
> 


-P 5h 
O 


«H 


r4 3 


-d o 

CD 

CO 0) 


r4 -H 

d 

rH 


CO CO 


«h d 


0) d 


O -P 


CO CD 


o 




CO u 


-p 




d O 


3 




s 


r4 d 




CD -H 


d 




+-> 


> T3 




d rH 


3 




■P d 


T3 d 




CO -P 







0) 


CO 5h 




-p 


co d 




rH 







d d 


CO >> 







CO 




5h 73 


d co 




£ 


3 




l> d 


o o 




t> 


t> -iH 




05 fn 


05 > 




rH d 


rH 







5h 




">> 


•> a 




iH 


r4 




CO 







>>3 


>>XI 




5h 


5h -P 




d -H 


d 




3 > 


53 ?-i 




A 


3 




d U 


d > 




>s a 


>-3 O 







m 




x! xi 


x! t> 




H-P 


H 05 




54 


O 







CN 




> 


CN 







#3- 







o o o o o 


00 01 


moo 




rH O O O 


o 


CO 


O 


m co o 




oo o r> t> 


• 


• 


m 


• • « 


00 


»•>•>•• 


00 


r-{ 


•- 


CO rH O 


l> 


00 CN O CN 


m 


r-H CD 


co 05 m 


05 


t> CO CO 




m 




05 CN CN 


rH 


CO rH 00 




•. 




^ ^ -N 


1 


«N »s ** 




CO 




CM oi m 


>H 


O 00 00 




r-\ 




m m 


Ph 


rH ^ lO 
CN CN 












m-m-tt-m- 






m-vs-m- 





■^ m o m o 




MMONO 




l> O I> t> • 


^- 


.. .. ~ ~co 


i> 


oo rH co i> m 


05 


m co oo 


<-i 


<* i-H in 


1 


•\ «\ «\ 


X 


O 00 00 


Ph 


rH CO ^ 



m C5 
co oo 

• CN 

m ~ 

CN CD 



05 



CN CN 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 
r>cot>cor-iooo'tf | 05LncN 

rHC0COC^rHCO00O05CN-* 
OOCMOmCDOrHOOOOlCO 

oomcorH^co'^cococooo 



00 
CN 



CN 



<N 00 ■* 



C/T\. <T\ rA fO <T\ C-CX- fA [*/"< fA i'/'v r/V 
y^r txa" W Wr t3/5^ t/y \77^ W t/y tS^T ttv- 



moo 
m co o 

CD CN O 

rH co m 

CO CO CM 

cm oo m 
m m 



W-&-W- 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

t>C0CN00rHO00'*05CMC0 
rHC0C0C^rH<tfC0OC5CO00 

oocNcomco05mooocor> 
oomcorH^mcMcocooos 



oo 

CN 



I CM 



CM 00 ■* 



£i£x. rf\ rf\ rr\ rf\ cC\ rf\ rr\ cr\ rr\ rf> 

t?T w tx?- OT W^ t?T3- W \7V^ \7^ wr w 



■* o o o 


o 


m 


00 


CN O O 


00 o o o 


o 


CD 


o 


CO O o 


CN CO O CO 


• 


• 


o 


• • • 


•k •» •* *s 


o 


m 


•* 


CO o o 


00 O TP rH 


m 


r-{ CD 


05 m o 


m co 05 




r^ 




CO CO CJ5 


CD rH t> 




~ 




•\ •* •* 


•\ n «s 




00 




^H 05 ^ 


M CD ^ 




r-i 




m ■* 


O <-i 










CM CM 










&■&-&■&$■ 






c«-«e-«o- 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 

t>t>-^00COCMO5^r>.rHO5 

rHCMrHCDCOCN050CDr>CM 
00C0-*OOt>C0OrHC000 

oomornmmcMcomo5i> 



oo 

CM 



CM 



r-i m co 



rf\ ff\ f/^i i*/^ c^\ r f \ c^t £/X ff\ i*A f/^ 
vr ix?^ w tyy^ v?^ t?v^ tyy^ t/y w w txs- 



CD CO 
05 05 
• 00 
r-i 

CO 

m 



05 m 

o o 

• oo 

05 
t> 

CO 

■H/ 



CO CO 

■* m 
• t> 

00 

oo 

CO 















CO CO CO 




















CO £3 3 




















d CO 




















s a •<-* -r^ 




















-P -P 




















<h -h d d 




















Or N N 










>> fl 










CQ d -H -H 










+J o 


T3 








Xi N 3 3 











T3 5h -H 











4-> +-> -H d d a 




CO 






-P 


CO 








d rH 3 bo bfi -H 




P 






co a d 


CO 








+j d d ?h ?h xl 




>> 


-P 




CO O 3 


T) 








CO MO O CO 




+-> o 


a 




U rH 

CO Ph -P d 


CO 








£ 5h £h 




•H -H 


s 




CO CO 


Q 




CO 


T3 3 O +J O 




rl rH +-> 


■p 




CO d > 


CO < 


W 




Sh 


O HAS 




O X! O 


a x 




<! r-i +-> 





Eh 


^"N 


o 


■P S >>X> 




XI 3 -rl 


s w 




d CO o 


CO to 


J5 


^-n CO 


l-H 


•H g 5h d rH CO 




-p a £h 







co a w o 


CO bJ3 


<! 


>> £3 


Eh 


3 O d +-> O 3 




3 -P 


X CO 




■P O O 


«aj G 


PS 


r-i d /"> 


a 


p O in -H > O 




O d co 


& -p 




£3 CO rH 


•H 


O 


ti Sh^ 


a 


U -H 




•H 


3 




3 ?H d C3 rH 


CO rH 




C3 


w 


-P d £3 hfi 




bfl O Q 


CO 3 


Eh 


«o- 


rH 


CO 


T3 -V -H 


X 


XI 3 -H X! -H 




3 -P 


O 


P3 


o a pc; -h 


5h 


Sh 


<-i r-^ 


w 


+J -P J O ffl rH 




•H d 


Sh 


O 


O -P 5h 


O ? 


O 


Ph > CQ 









CO +J 


O 


Oh 


<U i i d 


< a 


HH 


S_^N*.^^^ 


w 


«H «H 4H <H «H PS 




3 2^ 


< < 


w 


3 a 




Eh 




Eh 


o o o o o 


w